Dr. Rich Edwards

Questions for Alexandre Philippe for August 1st Shindig

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One simple question that I've had in mind for Dr. Edwards and Wes Gehring during the course would be their favorite and least favorite Hitchcock films. So that would be a simple question that can also be extended to Mr. Philippe.

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Hello Mr. Philippe! You mentioned on air that the title of your movie "78/52" means 78 camera setups and 52 cuts. Can you explain in more detail the traditional process of pre and post-production in 1960, and how Hitchcock revolutionized cinema with this 3 minute shower scene?

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Thank you for the opportunity to ask questions.

 

As we have read in Professor Edward's lecture notes, Hitchcock was "most likely the most written about filmmaker of the 20th century." Viewers appreciated his movies for their originality and style, creativity, set designs and music. Other directors began to make films in the Hitchcock style starting in the late 1960s. He never won an Academy Award for best director, although his body of work was acknowledged by the AFI in 1979.

 

In light of Hitchcock's success as a director, why was the general opinion of Hitchcock through the mid 1960s seen as one of a "successful entertainer" rather than a director?

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Hello Mr. Philippe and Professor Edwards,

    1.  Mr. Hitchcock dealt with many limitations to his "touch" during his career. What would you consider his most unrestrained film?

    2.  What might Mr. Hitchcock think of contemporary film-making especially those films created in the suspense/action and romantic comedy genres? Do you think he would embrace CGI?

    3.  Did Mr. Hitchcock admire any other filmmakers or films in his later years? What might he think of Brian DePalma's homage of films to his legacy.

    4.  What were the inner motivations that led Mr. Hitchcock to explore the darker side or nightmares of life?

         Thank you and great course and collaborations.

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Thank you all again for this opportunity.

 

I have a quick question...What was meant: "scenario by?"

It is no longer used. Did it mean something on the order of a treatment?

 

If anyone knows, please answer here.

Thank you again,

 

Joan Tarshis

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Which murder scene was more difficult for Hitchcock to choreograph: the famous murder of Janet Leigh's character in the shower in "Psycho" or the murder in the farm house of the East German agent in "Torn Curtain?"  Explain.

 

Thanks for taking time to share your expertise with us! 

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Could you elaborate more on some of Hitchcock's ditched efforts such as Kaleidoscope, The Blind Man, and others? Which do you find most intriguing? Which do you think Hitch most regretted not making? 

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I have a simple question to our very own Dr.Rich Edwards and to our honoured guest Mr. Philippe. Here's the question.

Q.) Which Hitchcockian heroine do you admire the most from the Silent Era till the Universal Years of Hitchcock films.

 

(P.S. Well, I love Grace Kelly a lot, What's yours?)

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To both Dr. Edwards and Mr. Philippe:

 

Whom would you consider a "current Hitchcock-type director today?  I think M. Night Shayamalan comes close due to the way he creates a life/relationship story amongst his characters within the story line of the movie; he tends to set his movies in the outdoors; he also lets the viewer see the mystery while we watch the characters figure out a resolve; and I notice now he also adds MacGuffins in his films, and of course, he appears in his films.  Your thoughts?

 

Thank you for sharing your love and enthusiasm for Hitchcock!  I'm going to miss this class!

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Hello Alexandre Phillipe. Hello again Dr. Edwards! I just wanted to ask what was the biggest draw or motivation for making 78/52? As a filmmaker this interests me very much. I know all too well of the challenges filmmakers face so congrats on it's completion and thank you for being a part of this massive online course. Continued success!

 

Sincerely,

David

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Hi Alexandre: I really enjoyed your discussions with Ben before all the Hitchcock movies last week. I have see most of his movies at least 10 times including his silent films and your pre and post move discussions were quite enlightening. I actually have a personal question? Are you one of my fellow Canadians? I grew up just north of Montreal and am curious as to whether you are from Quebec, Eastern Ontario or New Brunswick? 

Tony Cowan

Vancouver, B.C. 

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Alexandre,

Thank you so much for making 78/52, which I have seen twice now.

I'm just wondering why you didn't get into the whole Saul Bass controversy about how much he contributed to the shower scene?

Respectfully,

Michael

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My question is for both Dr. Edwards and Mr. Philippe.

If you had to pick one Hitchcock movie as your favorite, which one would it be and why?

 

- Lauren Applegren

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Like everyone, I would love to know where/when/how I can view Mr. Philippe's film.  It sounds so intriguing, and I do love "Psycho".  Thanks.

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If Mr Hitchcock were to make the movie Psycho today, do you think he would make a vastly different movie or still make the same film?  In particular, how might the shower scene be filmed differently.

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Greetings and thank you for so much for a great experience. Would you please discuss Anthony Perkins role in Psycho. What was his relationship with Hitchcock? Was he involved in the shower scene? I have always felt for him as an actor for while it is an incredible piece of work I believe it stopped his career from moving forward. The part was so readily identified with him it handicapped him.  Nancy K.  

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     Casting Sean Connery right after he had done the first James Bond film, Dr. No, as the lead in Marnie was a courageous move on Hitchcock's part. Since we know from analyzing how Hitchcock used stars in his films, do you think Hitchcock was trying play with audience expectations of Sean Connery's on-screen persona in Marnie ?  By casting Connery in the role of a man who struggles to help a woman who is suffering emotionally and mentally, he seemed almost to be saying to the audience you thought this was going to be an adventure/romance film like Dr. No where Connery(007) wins the girl's love right away in the first few minutes of the film.

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Vertigo is often quoted as Hitch's greatest film. How much do you think the San Francisco locations enchance the visual effects or is it irrelevant because it looked like a travelogue? Does that apply to the famous locations used?

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I've noticed a recurring shot in many of Hitch's films is a straight down view of a staircase usually with peoples hands visible on the handrails. Other than being an interesting shot angle what is the significance (if any) of these shots for Hitch?

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I remember seeing an interview with Hitch many years ago where he disdained clever camera shots that were not realistic. The example he gave was a shot looking into a room from inside a fireplace with the flames visible in the foreground. To him there was no reason to have a POV shot like this as it doesn't represent a realistic perspective. Do you think Hitch always adhered to this philosophy in his own films?

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I"ve seen on the credits a few times Pat Hitchcock as appearing. Strangers on a Train was one. What part did she play? I assume this was Hitch's daughter. And we don't hear a lot about the "family life" at home with Alma during especially his Universal Years.  They only had the 1 daughter; so what was Alma doing? Thanks for a great Hitchcock Education. 

 

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Greetings Mr. Philippe and Professor Edwards,

Knowing that the shower scene in Psycho was such an elaborate accomplishment with so many camera set-ups, unique editing cuts and then married so well to the soundtrack, I'm wondering if the edited version of the scene was made first and then given to Bernard Herrmann to score or was there some back-and-forth, "make the image fit the music or more music fit the image"?  They are so well synced there must have been some artistic communication between the editor and the composer.  Thank you, Ron Ferguson

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In this course, I have learned a lot of new things about Hitchcock and I am amazed by his creativity an his willingness to experiment and take risks. I am an audiovisual communicator and I know how it is to work according certain boundaries in terms of standard premises, concepts or expectations as part of the production of, for example, a short film or a screenplay. That is why I admire the confidence Hitchcock shows in many of the interviews we saw in this course regarding all the innovations and new ideas he brought to the cinema from the early periods of his career. So, I was wondering, If there is an interview, letter or statement made by Hitchcock in which he expresses that personal fear of going beyond those boundaries and how he solved that in order to stand firm to his convictions.

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