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Moviebuffer12

The funniest Drama you have ever seen.

37 posts in this topic

In terms of films that were so bad it was funny, I would say THE MUMMY(new version). I loved it when I watched it 3 years ago, but I saw it on TV the other day, I couldn't stop laughing cause it was so bad. But I created this forum about Dramas that had intentional jokes.

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This is a great question and I'll have to think about it, but I watched "Dark Passage" last week (classic Bogie/Bacall), and I was surprised at how funny it was in certain parts. I love that movie and I had heard that it wasn't very good.

Andrea

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But.. "The Big Chill" is a comedy...

As far as dramas that are more funny than drama.. Least we forget "Mommy Dearest".. That is one of the stupidest movies I've ever watched... I mean seriously.. Over-The-Top acting at it's best...

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Isn't that the movie in which all the stars and the director were exposed to the radiation from nuclear testing, and they all eventually died from cancer? Nothing funny about that. (Dick Powell, Susan Hayward, John Wayne, Agnes Moorehead).

Edited by: finance on Nov 30, 2009 2:41 PM

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How about Zero Hour? Not a bad movie in itself; unfortunately, much of the plot and dialogue were re-used in the 1980 comedy masterpiece Airplane!, and so it is virtually impossible not to play a home version of MST3K during certain scenes.

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I suggest a 1950's horror/sci-fi called "THE THING" (not the later John Carpenter version with kurt Russell). The only stars whose names i can recall were Kennith Toby and although you never seen him other then in makeup James Arness(pre Gunsmoke) as the monster. I have seen this little gem many times and i am always struck on how comfortable the actors seem to be with the script and with each other the humor is very dry and often a little macabe, but it delievers.

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Cruel Intentions is my choice. its a contemporary version of Dangerous Liasions. When I saw it, i thought it was really funny but for the life of me-I dont know if it was intended to be funny or not. Thats why it gets my vote.

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I'll have to concur on "Mommie Dearest" that movie was hilarious. Is is bad that I was empathizing with Joan Crawford? Something about her daughter annoyed me and I didn't feel bad for her. I know that that is wrong.

"Wicker Man," Nicholas Cage yelling "Not the bees!"

"Titanic," Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winselt's scene in the ocean when poor Leo is freezing to death and Kate won't scoot over on that huge board she's on. The scene when the ship is straight up and down and that guy falls and hits the propeller with a "ping" sound. These things really shouldn't be funny. I know they shouldn't. But something about it elicits laughs out of me.

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I would like to see the 1978 movie "MOMENT BY MOMENT" which I've read about as being unintentionally funny.  Lily Tomlin and John Travolta star.  Never on video as far as I can discern (or I would have bought it).  Apparently Lily Tomlin is a bored Beverly Hills housewife or socialite (or some such) and John Travolta is some dude named "Strip Harrison" and they meet.  Righto then.  If that doesn't sound like 'guaranteed entertainment' I don't know what does.  Hee Hee.   

 

The 1980 drama WINDOWS, which I've seen 3 times, has some interesting moments and some very scenic shots of New York City circa 1979 (courtesy director Gordon Willis) -and- also some parts that are hilarious and cannot possibly have been intended that way.  The climactic confrontation scene between Talia Shire and Elizabeth Ashley cracks me up.  I couldn't help it; I had to laugh.  I do like the movie all right despite itself and remember "It's Lawrence -- don't call me 'Larry'!!"  Those who have not seen this should check it out when you're in the mood for something indescribably screwy.  ► It may not hit you until after the movie is over just how barmy the whole thing really is.  But trust me:  It's one-of-a-kind but not a good kind. 

 

     Anyone who can watch the scene with Shire and Ashley at the end and not bust out laughing deserves some form of credit for keeping a straight face.  I could not on any of my 3 viewings. 

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I think this movie is more intentionally funny than unintentionally, but it has a bit of both. The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947). When I first saw this movie I thought it was a comedy, it was hilarious, but I've never actually seen anyone refer to it as a comedy.

 

Beware minor spoilers

 

It wasn't just surly Rex Harrison that was funny, but how George Sanders was such a creep and she didn't seem to notice. She got quite a surprise when she visited his home, but I knew how it would turn out and got a good laugh out of that dramatic scene. Later, another hilarious line about seeing him again years later ("He was bald and fat, and had too much to drink and started crying" she said so passively.) Another funny bit was her maid, an older woman who seemed unaffected by the passing decades. Our heroes got older, but she was always the same. Yes, the romantic bits went by without my notice, but I think of this very fondly as a really funny movie.

 

(By the way, I like this idea for a thread. I hope people keep mentioning unintentionally funny films as well, with all due respect to the OP and his wishes.)

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The Barbara Stanwyk/Ralph Meeker drama JEAPORDY. 

 

Mr Teek & I watched it one afternoon and laughed our a s-s-e-s off. The premise was a family vacationing at a beach. The young son wanders off to a crumbling pier and gets his foot stuck. The father, instead of helping him, climbs up onto the pier himself, urges the kid to walk back and the pier collapses on the father and traps him. The entire debacle is laughably ridiculous.

 

As the tide rises, it's Stanwyk's job to "get help" before he drwns. Even though she meets a group of Mexicans along the way, she gives up trying to communicate with them and drives off (!) She meets up with Meeker, an escaped convict who takes her hostage. 

 

There are MANY hilarious moments, one when Meeker looks into the glove box and finds a GUN! Sorry, no one in their right mind stores a handgun in the glove box...only a Hollywood writer would think that one up.

 

The scene that made us roll around in laughter was when the cops stopped Stanwyk's car "looking for the criminal". Meeker pretended to be asleep and the cops just let them go!

Really?

You don't think in "real life" the cops would wake him & take a look at his face?

 

It remains our favorite "comedy" and I made a magnet of this picture for the 'fridge that always makes me laugh:

 

jeopardy.jpg

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I know I heard Alfred Hitchcock refer to his movie "Psycho" as being a comedy. I guess some people didn't see it that way.

But Hitchcock is a great example of what the OP is looking for. There are some very funny "bits" in many of his films and he seems to have positioned certain actors specifically to be comic relief. I'm thinking especially of Jessie Royce Landis in "North by Northwest" and "To Catch a Thief" and Thelma Ritter in "Rear Window". And there was often some good comic byplay between the male and female leads, such as in "The 39 Steps" and "Satoteur". Rebecca's employer in the early part of that film is an appalling character, but definitely played for laughs, or at least chuckles of recognition. Tippi Hedren's character in "The Birds" goes out of her way to play a very elaborate joke, which isn't necessarily "funny" but it sets a very light initial tone, so that what comes later can have its full effect. Hitchcock was a master of many things, one of them being the use of intentional comedy to heighten the effect of drama. To answer the question of what was the funniest drama I've ever seen, it would probably be "North by Northwest", due to both Landis and Cary Grant, who does some great comic double-takes and a near constant stream of comic patter and wry commentary as he gets more and more involved in danger. How funny is the scene in the train station men's room, with Grant trying to "inconspicuously" shave with the tiny razor? Priceless.

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Cary Grant after drinking bourbon in North by Northwest.

 

Charles Laughton as the lawyer in Witness for the Prosecution.

 

Peter Ustinov as the slave buyer in Spartacus.

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