Swithin

God's Own Country

28 posts in this topic

God's Own Country, a new British gay-themed movie, sounds like a film of great promise. (Perhaps it could be called "Queers in Bronte-land.")  It opens in the UK in September and in the US in October. Here's an article about it, from the Weekend FT; also a trailer:

 

17440-1-1100.jpg?w=780

 

 

https://www.ft.com/content/9fd6db16-7d13-11e7-ab01-a13271d1ee9c

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

God's Own Country, a new British gay-themed movie, sounds like a film of great promise. (Perhaps it could be called "Queers in Bronte-land.")  It opens in the UK in September and in the US in October. Here's an article about it, from the Weekend FT; also a trailer:

 

17440-1-1100.jpg?w=780

 

 

https://www.ft.com/content/9fd6db16-7d13-11e7-ab01-a13271d1ee9c

 

It sounds like an intrigung film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are comparing it to "Brokeback Mountain" - it does seem to share the same landscape and the two men look hot but will they have that magical Heath-Jake chemistry?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are comparing it to "Brokeback Mountain" - it does seem to share the same landscape and the two men look hot but will they have that magical Heath-Jake chemistry?

They'd better have it!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has been screened here and there and won the Best Director Award at Sundance. Here are a few reviews, and an excerpt from one of them:

 

"Progress, as Americans now know all too bitterly, moves slowly. Sexual liberation has not spread into the rural sheep farms of Northern Yorkshire. There will be many people who see themselves in the furtive glances and mud-covered kisses from which “God’s Own Country” weaves its harsh but hopeful narrative, and they will do so while witnessing a finely crafted piece of cinema."

 

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/gods-own-country-review-sundance-2017-964686

 

http://www.indiewire.com/2017/01/gods-own-country-sundance-review-gay-1201772800/

 

http://variety.com/2017/film/reviews/gods-own-country-review-1201966096/

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally saw God's Own Country (2017) this evening. Gorgeous, tremendously moving and satisfying film. Gays in Bronte land, beautifully done. I've always liked Josh O'Connor, and he is brilliant, as is the rest of the cast. Can't believe I didn't recognize Gemma Jones, whom I've seen on stage at least ten times. 

I've been to that part of the world -- stone wall country -- and the special nature of the people and the landscape comes through in the movie. I even went to a cattle auction once, in Skipton, which is not too far from Keighley, where the film was made. This film is surely a gay essential.

1-944x537.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It sounds like the perfect film for the IFC Center in Greenwich Village.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's an extremely bleak, but highly involving rural romance (Yorkshire), which involves a young man who is helping his crippled father work a sheep farm and a young migrant worker who comes to help both of them out.

The two young men who seem to live a hopeless existence fall deeply in love and thereby re-claim their humanity.

Josh O'Connor as Johnny and Alec Secareanu as Gheorghe give such compelling, realistic performances.

And Gemma Jones and Ian Hart lend fine support as Johnny's weather-beaten parents.

image.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At The British Independent Film Awards, this film won Best British Independent Film, Best Actor (Josh O'Connor) and Best Debut Screenplay (Francis Lee, who is also the director).

  DWWTUmQW4AAk4R4.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, rayban said:

It's an extremely bleak, but highly involving rural romance (Yorkshire), which involves a young man who is helping his crippled father work a sheep farm and a young migrant worker who comes to help both of them out.

I actually don't find it that bleak, although of course life is difficult. I see it partly as a sort of gay, rural Zorba the Greek: a man from the South/East of Europe helps an uptight Englishman learn how to live and love. In that scene where Gheorghe rushes to look at the Yorkshire landscape, spread out in the distance, you get the impression that he's showing Johnny the beauty of his (Johnny's) land; and that Johnny sees the beauty of "God's own country" for the first time.

gods_640x345_acf_cropped.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Swithin said:

I actually don't find it that bleak, although of course life is difficult. I see it partly as a sort of gay, rural Zorba the Greek: a man from the South/East of Europe helps an uptight Englishman learn how to live and love. In that scene where Gheorghe rushes to look at the Yorkshire landscape, spread out in the distance, you get the impression that he's showing Johnny the beauty of his (Johnny's) land; and that Johnny sees the beauty of "God's own country" for the first time.

gods_640x345_acf_cropped.jpg

Yes, it's a film of enormous depth - not only between Johnny and Gheorghe, but between Johnny and his parents.

I like your comparison to "Zorba The Greek".

What would have happened to Johnny if Gheorghe hadn't entered his life?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/22/2018 at 8:36 AM, rayban said:

How healing can love be? -

1a46350d0e32d89ed515deacba7353e5.gif

Beautiful kiss- Happy Pride Day

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, jaragon said:

Beautiful kiss- Happy Pride Day

Happy Pride Day to you - and everyone else - today!

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎6‎/‎22‎/‎2018 at 8:43 AM, Swithin said:

I actually don't find it that bleak, although of course life is difficult. I see it partly as a sort of gay, rural Zorba the Greek: a man from the South/East of Europe helps an uptight Englishman learn how to live and love. In that scene where Gheorghe rushes to look at the Yorkshire landscape, spread out in the distance, you get the impression that he's showing Johnny the beauty of his (Johnny's) land; and that Johnny sees the beauty of "God's own country" for the first time.

The bleakness is really from Johnny's having fallen into a pattern of drunkenness and anonymous, quick sex and a disregard for his family responsibilities. As soon as Gheorghe shows up, that began to change and Johnny, as well as we the viewers, begins to see the possibilities in that stark but gorgeous landscape. I was happy that the lovers found a way to make it work, but I was equally as touched that Johnny and his father achieved such a meaningful peace between them. Love this movie.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know that it opened on the West Coast last year.

But I don't know if it ever opened on the East Coast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The US theatrical release last fall had little promotion and came and went with little notice.  Our local indie theatre actually did show it, but buried it during daytime screenings, making it difficult to see, even if you had heard of it. But now that the film is on Netflix and DVD/Blu-ray, people are really discovering it. It’s so heartfelt and beautiful, it’s quickly become one of my favorites. I hope it comes back to theatres at some point. I’d love to see it on the big screen with an audience.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, since I did miss it last fall, I am grateful to Netflix for the opportunity to have finally seen the film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, MarkH said:

The US theatrical release last fall had little promotion and came and went with little notice.  Our local indie theatre actually did show it, but buried it during daytime screenings, making it difficult to see, even if you had heard of it. But now that the film is on Netflix and DVD/Blu-ray, people are really discovering it. It’s so heartfelt and beautiful, it’s quickly become one of my favorites. I hope it comes back to theatres at some point. I’d love to see it on the big screen with an audience.

It's too bad the studio dumped it - because with a stronger push it might have even gotten some Oscar nominations

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Swithin said:

It did win many awards, around the world and a few American. 

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5635086/awards?ref_=tt_awd

There are many interviews online with the actors and director.

Here's Josh O'Connor accepting a Best Actor Award (British Independent Films Awards):

His good nature and light-heartedness here really highlight what an achievement his performance was, creating that tortured character.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us