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mono01

plexation

9 posts in this topic

for the last two weeks i have been getting peixation on tcm hd and sony hd channel anyone else having this problem had a tech come cover from direscv and check dish and said that the dish was fine so he replace the receiver and one day later it is still piexation on both channels . thank you.

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Does your dish have a clear line-of-sight?  Are there trees in the way?  There are diagnostics that the technician can look at, though not all may think to try.  One of them shows the signal strengths of all the transponders on each satellite it receives.  Probably more than you want to think about, but definitely something a Directv technician can look at (this is easily done using the satellite receiver and TV set).

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for the last two weeks i have been getting peixation on tcm hd and sony hd channel anyone else having this problem had a tech come cover from direscv and check dish and said that the dish was fine so he replace the receiver and one day later it is still piexation on both channels . thank you.

i had a tech come on over from directv and he aline my dish and put a new receiver and i am still getting judder and plix piitures on tcm hd sony hd and my local channels i live in tampa florida anyone else having this problem?

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You might want to post over here too, more people who have a clue about these things:

https://www.satelliteguys.us/xen/forums/directv-support-forum.11/

 

Using process of elimination... Maybe a bad LNB on the dish, or a bad Power Injector? (PI is a small box that powers up the the active electronics on the satellite dish, it is located somewhere along the coax cable, between the dish and receiver)  Also you might have an "SWM", a device with a splitter on it.  This connects the satellite dish to the Genie receiver and also the Genie clients.  The installers put my PI and SWM on the floor behind my entertainment center.  It's been sitting there just fine for three years.

 

It looks like mine is connected like this:

satellite dish >> power injector >>SWM splitter >> Genie receiver & clients

 

Of course there are other types of configurations in older installations.

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On 10/3/2017 at 6:11 AM, mono01 said:

i had a tech come on over from directv and he aline my dish and put a new receiver and i am still getting judder and plix piitures on tcm hd sony hd and my local channels i live in tampa florida anyone else having this problem?

if someone can look at directv channel 256hd so let me know if that channel has judder because i still have judder on all the movies .thank you.

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folks still having pixeation on tcm directv channel 256 if anyone is on this channel will you look and see this problem for me. i have replace the dish outside the lnb and new wires from lnb to new spitter also have a new receiver and still getting this problem.today date is 12/15/2017 thank you.

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folks again i need to know if most of you are seeing plexation and judder on all movies on directv channel 256 tcm hd .please let me know.

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again i say that directv channel 256 hd tcm is still having problems with plexation and frezzeing pictures people who have directv channel 256 hd let me know if you see what i see. thank you.

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Earlier you posted:

On 8/28/2017 at 9:55 AM, mono01 said:

for the last two weeks i have been getting peixation on tcm hd and sony hd channel anyone else having this problem had a tech come cover from direscv and check dish and said that the dish was fine so he replace the receiver and one day later it is still piexation on both channels . thank you.

Then you posted:

On 4/17/2018 at 10:06 AM, mono01 said:

again i say that directv channel 256 hd tcm is still having problems with plexation and frezzeing pictures people who have directv channel 256 hd let me know if you see what i see. thank you.

I understand and am sadly familiar with Pixelation (when an image breaks up into pixels, sometimes overwhelming the image), and judder (rapid or spasmodic shaking, or vibration), and freezing (as when a video stops dead in its tracks)...    But for the life of me I was unable to find an appropriate definition for either peixation or plexation.
Regardless, I neither live in FL, nor am I a subscriber of direct-TV.
My cable TV provider does offer some HD channels, but TCM is not one of them and most of their broadcast content is native SD and not HD anyway.
My TV is a 1080p HD monitor, but most of what I watch (aside from 720p or 1080p DVDs) is Standard definition or 480i. Some TV is broadcast in 720p and a few channels upscale that broadcast in 1080i, but because broadcasters standardized before progressive scan technology became the norm, very few (that I am aware of) broadcast in anything native to the viewers 1080 (or higher) progressive "p" technology, yet.
My TV can upscale and downscale a bit from whatever native format the broadcast is, and has a fast enough GPU to accommodate the monitor's native screen resolution, without any ill or noticeably negative effect (at least not to my eyes perception).
But I have absolutely no idea what your equipment is nor it's capabilities.
I do know that broadcast video will occasionally pixilate, judder, and freeze, and when it does I am generally able to deduce (in my case) that it most often is a provider issue and NOT my equipment, but I cannot say the same regarding your situation.
Since TCM (and most of my TV viewing) is from SD channels, I fortunately rarely experience issues that can be common when an native SD transmission is up-scaled to adapt to a providers HD TV channel, then either down-scaled or further up-scaled by the users receiver hard and software, and again, to fit the native resolution of users TV monitor. High-end TVs, with fast GPUs can do that work with minimal added distortion, however there is cumulative degradation to the user/viewers image when there is much up and down-scaling from one point to another.
So many variables from the TCM origination signal (which can be corrupted to begin with) to the TV users Dish, or (in my case) my TV provider's main dish, where it is then transmitted by relay or cable to the users receiver through lines and hubs and nodes to the pole to house line... anyone of which could be corrupt or inconsistent at times (via component weakness or failure), etc. through variables of the users end equipment, be that the receiver, modem, router, etc. and finally the individuals TV.
It is amazing to me that we can watch anything at all with all of this very friable technology.

However, all that said, and taking MCOH's valid advice and suggestions, what you need is a response from someone using direct TV, who is also watching (or attempting to watch) TCM on an HD channel (preferably channel 256). If they live close to you, so much the better. And they need to be watching the same thing you are at the same time you are. It appears that only then will you be able to trouble shoot your problem to the point to rule-out whether it is an issue closer to your home or more general. I.e. if they are experiencing the same problems as yourself then the likelihood that the problem is your equipment becomes less likely. However, if they are not experiencing a similar problem with HD channel 256, then you have pretty well ruled out that it is a problem originating with TCM, and/or your TV providers equipment (unless they are using a different model of receiver, etc. than yourself). So many variables that require ruling-out, by trial and error.
If it were me (knowing what I know about TCM), if you can view TCM movies with no problem from a non-HD channel, that is the way to go.
So long as you have no issues with watching your other native HD programs on HD channels, and your other native SD programs on non-HD channels, I wouldn't sweat this issue any further than that.
Watching TCM on an HD channel isn't going to turn their native SD broadcasts into HD. No amount of adaptive up-scaling can do that. At best the equipment can merely make those broadcasts view-able in a non-native format HD, but not without some degradation. Progressive HD up-scaling can only enlarge the existing pixels (on larger screen TVs) and smooth out some of the rough edges by filling in the gaps left by missing pixels, but it cannot actually add more more pixels than what was originally there to begin with (i.e. a 1 million pixel 720 can never become a 2 million pixel 1080). But depending on the size and quality of your monitor, and the distance between yourself and the screen (and of course the acuity of your eyesight), you can watch a native 720 on a 1080 (and vice versa) and likely not notice any negligible difference.

The i and p stands for interlaced (i) and progressive (p) scans.
The interlaced scan does every other line on one frame then goes back and does the opposite set of lines on the next, progressive starts at pixel lines 1 and goes through to the last pixel line before going back to the beginning. The difference is the amount of information being generated by the TV each frame, a progressive frame rate is a much larger amount of data. Which is why, when the broadcasters went from analog to digital, they used the i technology of the day. P technology gobbles up more bandwidth than i, and 1080 uses more bandwidth than 720, and 720 uses more than 480, and analog was already a bandwidth hog, so they went i, relying on the user's home TV's ability to progressively up-scale. However, eventually the more commercialized use of fiber optics and native HD and digitally converted video to blu-ray media, and native 2K and eventual 4k (and even 8k and beyond) big-screen Ultra HD TV's is changing the world. But the profit motivated U.S. broadcasters, and TV and ISP's, are lagging far behind as the cost of fully upgrading to P and HD (and beyond) would cost them more than the mandated effort to switch from analog to digital technology. And ISP and TV providers charge way too much as is.
720p is still considered the low-end of HD, and can be displayed as a 1080i. And 720p uses much less bandwidth and is cheaper than 1080p. And when the "standards" were set, 720p was the most common of the progressive TVs because it was 25-35% cheaper than the 1080p counterparts at that time.
Even with today's de-interlacing hardware, interlaced modes can cause motion blur at times (very noticeable during fast action or sporting events), esp. in the cases of dropped frames and when the viewer is sitting very close to the TV.
However when sitting at an appropriate distance and esp. with 30" and smaller TV's there is there is generally no noticeable difference in appearance for 1080p and 720p other than covered resolution. It really only pays to go 1080p and 2k and 4k and beyond with the larger and larger TV screens, and only then if the broadcast or video itself is native to those much higher resolutions. But as of today, with most stations still broadcasting SD 480i, and some HD at 720p, the only way to appreciate all that pixel power is by watching a native 1080p (or higher) HD DVD or Blu-ray.
Some streaming services (i.e. PBS, Netflix, and YouTube, etc.) have offerings of 1080p HD, but your ISP account and home equipment must also be capable of handling the greater data. And all that data gobbles up GB quickly and costs more money...
So many variables. And TCM is still being broadcast in native 480i (at present).

I apologize for all this (perhaps unnecessary) rambling, but the main point I think that I am trying to make is that if you have a true HD channel and the equipment to appreciate it fine. But if you can watch TCM on a SD channel, with no pixilation, judder, or freezing, then I suggest that is the way to go.
Forget the TCM HD channel 256, and save your HD viewing for something that is native HD to begin with (which TCM is not, and not likely to ever completely be. At least not yet, anyway, as that would require the digital HD conversion of all of those old native SD classics that we have grown to love and appreciate.)

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