Jlewis

A discrete discussion on "adult" films and their social impact

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Before the AIDS epidemic there seemed to be a trend towards more bi-sexual erotica- even Jeff Stryker made one. A very hot bisexual scene in a mainstream horror is in "The Brotherhood"

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In "The Opening of Misty Beethoven", Casey Donovan (Cal Culver) was topped by a woman with a ****.

But he wasn't subjected to converting to heterosexuality, was he?

He really did enjoy that ****.

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I will go back and rewatch when I have time. I think everybody confuses Calvin with another actor in that film.

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7 hours ago, rayban said:

sandy-dennis-quotes.jpg

Classic image from Score, which I still think is a much better film than The Opening Of Misty Beethoven.

I did my homework, Rayban. 😎 Ras Kean was the actor in question, not Calvin.

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7 minutes ago, Jlewis said:

Classic image from Score, which I still think is a much better film than The Opening Of Misty Beethoven.

I did my homework, Rayban. 😎 Ras Kean was the actor in question, not Calvin.

I saw that scene and was kind of surprise that such moment was included in a what is basically a straight film

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As you suggested, many of these performers were getting flexible in regards to their "orientation" during the seventies and early eighties before the AIDS situation renewed and encouraged a wave of homophobia.

What probably made it "OK" to many heterosexual viewers at the time was the fact that, regardless of "toys" used, the man was still in cahoots with two women and there were no other men around. He showed no interest in men in any other scenes, even when giving Jamie the "bro-pat" later for providing him with the new experience. I am quite certain that many heterosexual men who had no previous same-sex attractions suddenly realized with films like this that it was OK to broaden your physical experiences without "being gay". Many wives and girlfriends had no problem using "toys" because it gave THEM a chance to play a "masculine" role behind closed doors for a change. Remember too that the seventies was the decade of Women's Liberation and an attempted, if not entirely successful at the time, balancing of the genders in the workforce, society and in the privacy of one's own home.

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21 hours ago, Jlewis said:

Classic image from Score, which I still think is a much better film than The Opening Of Misty Beethoven.

I did my homework, Rayban. 😎 Ras Kean was the actor in question, not Calvin.

Thanks so much, that guy was clearly having such a good time.

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8 hours ago, Jlewis said:

As you suggested, many of these performers were getting flexible in regards to their "orientation" during the seventies and early eighties before the AIDS situation renewed and encouraged a wave of homophobia.

What probably made it "OK" to many heterosexual viewers at the time was the fact that, regardless of "toys" used, the man was still in cahoots with two women and there were no other men around. He showed no interest in men in any other scenes, even when giving Jamie the "bro-pat" later for providing him with the new experience. I am quite certain that many heterosexual men who had no previous same-sex attractions suddenly realized with films like this that it was OK to broaden your physical experiences without "being gay". Many wives and girlfriends had no problem using "toys" because it gave THEM a chance to play a "masculine" role behind closed doors for a change. Remember too that the seventies was the decade of Women's Liberation and an attempted, if not entirely successful at the time, balancing of the genders in the workforce, society and in the privacy of one's own home.

The attitude as I recall in the the late 70's was that a guy might have a casual encounter with a man and no be seeing as gay. They even had an article about this in that bible of the straight male "Playboy".

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Watched recently two more Radley Metzger films released under his other name Henry Paris: The Private Afternoons Of Pamela Mann (1974) and Naked Came The Stranger (also filmed in 1974, but released 1975). Both resemble The Opening Of Misty Beethoven but differ from the earlier Score in that all of the relationships are strictly male/female and female/female (the one appeal to the LGBT viewers) and have an abundance of close-up shots which at least don't get as boring as they do in Misty Beethoven since there are more creative camera angles and a greater variety of activities involved. Nonetheless the material is still graphically explicit and, no, you will unlikely see either aired on regular TV.

It is a pity because both films are wonderful homages to the cinematic art-form. The acting is well above average, both when the performers are clothed and unclothed. As I suggested before, had he not done porn and was restricted from most average movie fans accordingly, Metzger would today be considered the seventies equivalent of Ernst Lubitsch. Take away the sex and you get some very beautifully written material here. Also a cheeky self awareness which includes a hilarious running gag in the first film with Doris Toumarkine as a poll taker interrupting Pamela's affairs with political questions in order to make this porn more “socially relevant” for mainstream release. Add to all of this some visual seasoning echoing producer Ross Hunter in his Universal-International days: the very retro shortly-after-Watergate fashions, complete with bell bottoms, plaid suits and high platform shoes galore, are dazzling in their rich color schemes.

The Private Afternoons Of Pamela Mann has the deceptively simple story of a wealthy husband (Alan Marlow) hiring a private investigator (Eric Edwards) to follow his wife's (Barbara Bourbon) daytime affairs, using the best 16mm and 8mm surveillance film equipment available at the time. It is later revealed... spoiler alert!!... that both husband and wife are fully in cahoots with all of this, as all of this “evidence” is utilized to spice up their domestic bliss. Therefore, we get lots of movies within movies here, much like the projectors in constant motion in Misty Beethoven, in addition to the earlier Score and The Lickerish Quartet. Even the servants (one of them played by Jamie Gillis) get involved, particularly in a bizarre garage hostage scene involving a gun that, at first glance, would bother many modern #MeToo viewers until you later realize everybody is fully aware they are playing a fantasy role and that the gun is unlikely loaded.

Naked Came The Stranger is based on a popular “hoax” novel concocted by a team of journalists as a joke and is only a tad bit more restrained than the other with its multitude of body parts in action, all shown... I guess... “in loving detail”. Yet if there is a PG-rated version floating around that still keeps the story in tact, we have another winner for TCM fans. Highlights include a costume ball in which the husband (Levi Richards) wears Marilyn Monroe's Seven Year Itch dress, even if his exposed hairy chest hardly makes him the proper drag queen, and the wife (Darby Lloyd Rains) sporting the tux like Marlene Dietrich. Among her many affairs, while her husband has his own, is a hilarious sequence in a double-decker bus with her very shy and neurotic male conquest screaming at all of the New Yorkers down below and a very artistically innovative sequence involving Gerald Grant (previously in Score) that is shot like a silent movie in black & white with title cards. The images of Manhattan are quite impressive with a few shots of the Twin Towers in the background.

Again, all of the intimacy shown are male/female and female/female. One guy passes himself as “gay” in Pamela Mann and uses Georgina Spelvin to “fix” him even though he is only pretending he needs “fixed”. Later Spiven and Barbara Bourbon’s Pamela enjoy each other in a scene that, to put it mildly, features Spelvin giving quite the method performance that would give Marlon Brando a run for his money. Hope the paramedics were on stand by in case she got too excited in her performance. Certainly the hubbie enjoys watching it all on film later.

The music is excellent in both. Be sure to put on the headphones for the full groovy hi fi stereo effect. George Craig receives on screen credit in the second film. I especially like the scenes in that one with characters running out of the mansion against a distinctive ricky-tick Nickelodeon style sound that fits the silly and fast-paced atmosphere. Above all, these are very fun movies with everybody clearly enjoying themselves and the music itself plays as important of a role as any of the humans on screen.

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43 minutes ago, Jlewis said:

Watched recently two more Radley Metzger films released under his other name Henry Paris: The Private Afternoons Of Pamela Mann (1974) and Naked Came The Stranger (also filmed in 1974, but released 1975). Both resemble The Opening Of Misty Beethoven but differ from the earlier Score in that all of the relationships are strictly male/female and female/female (the one appeal to the LGBT viewers) and have an abundance of close-up shots which at least don't get as boring as they do in Misty Beethoven since there are more creative camera angles and a greater variety of activities involved. Nonetheless the material is still graphically explicit and, no, you will unlikely see either aired on regular TV.

It is a pity because both films are wonderful homages to the cinematic art-form. The acting is well above average, both when the performers are clothed and unclothed. As I suggested before, had he not done porn and was restricted from most average movie fans accordingly, Metzger would today be considered the seventies equivalent of Ernst Lubitsch. Take away the sex and you get some very beautifully written material here. Also a cheeky self awareness which includes a hilarious running gag in the first film with Doris Toumarkine as a poll taker interrupting Pamela's affairs with political questions in order to make this porn more “socially relevant” for mainstream release. Add to all of this some visual seasoning echoing producer Ross Hunter in his Universal-International days: the very retro shortly-after-Watergate fashions, complete with bell bottoms, plaid suits and high platform shoes galore, are dazzling in their rich color schemes.

The Private Afternoons Of Pamela Mann has the deceptively simple story of a wealthy husband (Alan Marlow) hiring a private investigator (Eric Edwards) to follow his wife's (Barbara Bourbon) daytime affairs, using the best 16mm and 8mm surveillance film equipment available at the time. It is later revealed... spoiler alert!!... that both husband and wife are fully in cahoots with all of this, as all of this “evidence” is utilized to spice up their domestic bliss. Therefore, we get lots of movies within movies here, much like the projectors in constant motion in Misty Beethoven, in addition to the earlier Score and The Lickerish Quartet. Even the servants (one of them played by Jamie Gillis) get involved, particularly in a bizarre garage hostage scene involving a gun that, at first glance, would bother many modern #MeToo viewers until you later realize everybody is fully aware they are playing a fantasy role and that the gun is unlikely loaded.

Naked Came The Stranger is based on a popular “hoax” novel concocted by a team of journalists as a joke and is only a tad bit more restrained than the other with its multitude of body parts in action, all shown... I guess... “in loving detail”. Yet if there is a PG-rated version floating around that still keeps the story in tact, we have another winner for TCM fans. Highlights include a costume ball in which the husband (Levi Richards) wears Marilyn Monroe's Seven Year Itch dress, even if his exposed hairy chest hardly makes him the proper drag queen, and the wife (Darby Lloyd Rains) sporting the tux like Marlene Dietrich. Among her many affairs, while her husband has his own, includes a hilarious sequence in a double-decker bus with her very shy and neurotic male conquest screaming at all of the New Yorkers down below and a very artistically innovative sequence involving Gerald Grant (previously in Score) that is shot like a silent movie in black & white with title cards. The images of Manhattan are quite impressive with a few shots of the Twin Towers in the background.

Again, all of the intimacy shown are male/male and male/female. One guy passes himself as “gay” in Pamela Mann and uses Georgina Spelvin to “fix” him even though he is only pretending he needs “fixed”. Later Spiven and Barbara Bourbo's Pamela enjoy each other in a scene that, to put it mildly, features Spelvin giving quite the method performance that would give Marlon Brando a run for his money. Hope the paramedics were on stand by in case she got too excited in her performance. Certainly the hubbie enjoys watching it all on film later.

The music is excellent in both. Be sure to put on the headphones for the full groovy hi fi stereo effect. George Craig receives on screen credit in the second film. I especially like the scenes in that one with characters running out of the mansion against a distinctive ricky-tick Nickelodeon style sound that fits the silly and fast-paced atmosphere. Above all, these are very fun movies with everybody clearly enjoying themselves and the music itself plays as important of a role as any of the humans on screen.

Are these films available on DVD?

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Yes, but you can also see them online through the, um, usual sites. You know, the ones so many claim that they do NOT visit when they are bored and home alone. 😎 I enjoyed Naked Came The Stranger with a big bag of popcorn.

p.s. Had to correct my error above. There are no male/male scenes. I meant to post female/female that second time.

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7 hours ago, Jlewis said:

Yes, but you can also see them online through the, um, usual sites. You know, the ones so many claim that they do NOT visit when they are bored and home alone. 😎 I enjoyed Naked Came The Stranger with a big bag of popcorn.

p.s. Had to correct my error above. There are no male/male scenes. I meant to post female/female that second time.

I never saw "Naked Came The Stranger" movie but it's a very hot book- unfortunately one of the chapters is about a gay character who is "cured" after he has sex with a woman on Fire Island (?!). 

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2 hours ago, jaragon said:

I never saw "Naked Came The Stranger" movie but it's a very hot book- unfortunately one of the chapters is about a gay character who is "cured" after he has sex with a woman on Fire Island (?!). 

That scene was fortunately not included.

As mentioned before, Misty Beethoven is portrayed as such an incredible woman with so much talent that even Calvin Culver's very "gay" character is transformed, so to speak. In Pamela Mann, a heterosexual guy pretends he is gay and seeking a "cure". My impression is that Metzger didn't take all of that "conversion therapy" seriously, even though it was VERY popular in the seventies (not just with the religious, but even Masters & Johnson conducted experiments along these lines that decade). However I do find it strange that, after Score, he shied away from showing many male/male relationships in his movies even if there was still plenty of lesbianism on display along with the heterosexuality. Probably the reasons were more to do with marketing than anything personal, because gay male porn was very much a "niche" market compared to the other kinds.

That book is a story unto itself. Apparently the author "Penelope Ashe" was 24 journalists having fun as sex novel writers. Every effort was made to make it as trashy as possible and fool the public in the process. Per Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naked_Came_the_Stranger), the joke was exposed on the David Frost Show in August 1969, but then sales mushroomed further even though everybody now knew that Penelope was no Jackie Collins.

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59 minutes ago, Jlewis said:

That scene was fortunately not included.

As mentioned before, Misty Beethoven is portrayed as such an incredible woman with so much talent that even Calvin Culver's very "gay" character is transformed, so to speak. In Pamela Mann, a heterosexual guy pretends he is gay and seeking a "cure". My impression is that Metzger didn't take all of that "conversion therapy" seriously, even though it was VERY popular in the seventies (not just with the religious, but even Masters & Johnson conducted experiments along these lines that decade). However I do find it strange that, after Score, he shied away from showing many male/male relationships in his movies even if there was still plenty of lesbianism on display along with the heterosexuality. Probably the reasons were more to do with marketing than anything personal, because gay male porn was very much a "niche" market compared to the other kinds.

That book is a story unto itself. Apparently the author "Penelope Ashe" was 24 journalists having fun as sex novel writers. Every effort was made to make it as trashy as possible and fool the public in the process. Per Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naked_Came_the_Stranger), the joke was exposed on the David Frost Show in August 1969, but then sales mushroomed further even though everybody now knew that Penelope was no Jackie Collins.

I read the book when I was a teenager so I have vague memories. Straight men have no problem with lesbian scenes in their porn- because they are not threatened by two women having sex- in their minds they think they can cure them😳

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4 hours ago, Jlewis said:

This trailer covers the 2011 DVD release. Apparently there IS a "soft" version that is also available so, yeaaaahhhh, I could see TCM air that one. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZhHa928JoEY

The other: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDzQKtaxt3w

The stars look more annoying than sexy and seriously was the art director on acid!  The colors are hedious

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I'm shocked to find gambling going on in this nightclub...

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On 2/24/2019 at 8:53 PM, Jlewis said:

Classic image from Score, which I still think is a much better film than The Opening Of Misty Beethoven.

I did my homework, Rayban. 😎 Ras Kean was the actor in question, not Calvin.

Is there any biographical knowledge about Ras Kean?

He certainly had a memorable encounter in that film.

It was a one-of-a-kind sex scene.

I'd love to watch it just one more time.

image-original.png?1506297192

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11 hours ago, rayban said:

Is there any biographical knowledge about Ras Kean?

He certainly had a memorable encounter in that film.

It was a one-of-a-kind sex scene.

I'd love to watch it just one more time.

image-original.png?1506297192

Not much online. His career only lasted two years or so, plus an appearance at an awards show in 1985: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0443818/

My guess is that he is still alive, but left early from the business for other careers. Since the names used in these films were almost never the real ones, it is hard to keep track of them off-screen.

Not sure how "one of a kind" that scene is, but I am hardly surprised that this director would go there. Again, I have to reference the earlier Score which had scenes edited together of Calvin Culver with Gerald Grant alternating with Lynn Lowry as separate partners, the latter obviously needing the, um, addition. Today, of course, you can find such "additions" at every adult "book" store and online (probably Amazon as well). You can also make your own with kits or with instructions online (but be careful of your tender parts in the process) so your girlfriend or boyfriend won't miss you when you are away or... maybe you want to "love yourself" in a different way than usual. Ahem.

On 3/2/2019 at 12:24 PM, jaragon said:

The stars look more annoying than sexy and seriously was the art director on acid!  The colors are hedious

Weren't the 1970s great!

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10 hours ago, rayban said:

Is there any biographical knowledge about Ras Kean?

He certainly had a memorable encounter in that film.

It was a one-of-a-kind sex scene.

I'd love to watch it just one more time.

image-original.png?1506297192

I love his hair

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Radley Metzger stated in a Mondo Digital interview in 2000 that the types of movies he specialized in “are like musicals. They're judged on what happens between the numbers, not just during. So every scene has to be approached the same. We never worked harder on the sex than anything else. If the audience is not involved in the basic premise of the film, they probably won't think it's very sexy. This doesn't hold true if you're first with something, like The Jazz Singer or The Robe or Deep Throat. But I don't think I was ever first with anything.” http://www.mondo-digital.com/metzgertalk.html

His career essentially had two periods. The first consisted of the “soft” sixties culminating with the quite innocent Little Mother (filmed before Score in early 1972), when just nudity and suggested actions were what shocked the masses. This, in turn, was followed by the “hard” seventies... and I did get to three more from that era. I must admit that all of the bodies in motion do get boring after a while. Again, there are only so many ways that Hopalong Cassidy can ride a horse before even he gets dull. Regardless, I still prefer watching these mostly non-violent X-rated affairs, featuring women always in command and the men as either equals or subservient, over any R-rated horrors of the same decade with their bloodshed and frequent women-as-victims and punishing-teens-for-having-sex story-lines that even the very mild Halloween (1978) is guilty of.

The Image (1975) is his one semi-violent film with its increased use of whips, chains and thangs. Alas... I found myself fast-forwarding through much of it, not because it looked painful, but because it all got rather dull despite the pleasing postcard Paris scenery interrupting. Carl Parker, Marilyn Roberts and Rebecca Brooke are the three leads and there is a lot of dubbing of voices involved; Parker's voice is totally different than in Score and there is heavy narration focused on his point of view. This review compares and contrasts it to Fifty Shades Of Grey, filmed 39 years later: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKZz2v_4IrM

Barbara Broadcast (completed 1976, released '77) does deserve some praise for its unique setting: a swank Manhattan restaurant with sophisticated rich people in designer dresses and suit coats ordering more than just food on the menu. Since there is a heavy emphasis on the clothes, I should point out that most of the “nudity” consists of close-ups after pants are unzipped and dresses pulled up. Quite a bit more is displayed in the back kitchen with C.J. Laine teasing shirtless chef Wade Nichols among steaming pots on the stoves, since she seemed to have lost her way to the ladies restroom. (I will spare you the details.) Annette Haven plays the title character but she doesn't do a whole lot on screen; this being more of an ensemble piece with various characters doing various activities, including a still uncommon (for the seventies at least) interracial scene.

Maraschino Cherry (completed 1977, released '78) was mostly made after Metzger took a break with the PG-rated The Cat And The Canary, filmed '76-77 with big name stars keeping the clothes on. This one features Gloria Leonard as the star attraction. Say what you want about her acting, but she still has that personality, sultry voice and Plutonic face that keeps you glued on her at all times.

As usual, the material is strictly heterosexual and female bisexual with no male gay interest anywhere in sight. This gives Maraschino Cherry a rather peculiar atmosphere because there are scenes that suggest the possibilities here, especially one involving two bro-buddies waiting naked for a woman to arrive for them both. They do look at each other with some degree of affection but don't touch each other at all, just like the men observing other men-with-women in other scenes. I don't think Metzger was homophobic since Score was successful years earlier in that regard, but he knew fully well that his core heterosexual audience was by 1977-78. There was a serious backlash against the early gay rights movement at this time, but Anita Bryant and others crusading were intensely focused on gay men rather than lesbians. Maybe because his budgets were so much bigger than those of Tim Kincaid and Wakefield Poole (catering to the gay male), he needed a more mainstream release than they did and, therefore, had to eliminate even a hint of male/male affection during these later years? On a positive note, Maraschino's sister (Jenny Baxter) is quite vocal and proud that she favors women over men but will still do-what-a-women-has-to-do when it comes to men.

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