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rayban

Anthony Perkins

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Related to Psycho,  did Perkins decide to make films 'overseas' because American producers and studio heads weren't willing to cast him in roles that were not 'Psycho like' or did he go overseas because that is where he wanted to be,  making those type of films?    (e.g. as a gay man he felt more in his element in Europe than the USA????).

 

In addition the studio-era was winding down in the 60s and this impacted the careers of all actors.  

 

Yea,  his post Psycho career was 'all over the place' but I'm not sure how much Psycho-type-casting by American producers was the reason.

 

 

I dont really know the answer to that question.

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Did anyone watch Tall Story??? What a BAD movie.. You'd think you were watching a film about college in the 30s, not the 60s. That Jane Fonda survived this "debut" is remarkable. Wonder if this came out before or after Psycho (released the same year).

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Did anyone watch Tall Story??? What a BAD movie.. You'd think you were watching a film about college in the 30s, not the 60s. That Jane Fonda survived this "debut" is remarkable. Wonder if this came out before or after Psycho (released the same year).

According to IMDb Tall Story was released in April and Psycho was released in September.

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According to IMDb Tall Story was released in April and Psycho was released in September.

 

 

LOL. Glad it wasnt the other way around!!!

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You'd think you were watching a film about college in the 30s, not the 60s.

 

The Spring of 1960 (its release date) is hardly "the 60's".

 

It's a 1950's movie really.

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The Spring of 1960 (its release date) is hardly "the 60's".

 

It's a 1950's movie really.

 

I guess everyone doesn't know that that the '60s' as a cultural benchmark didn't really start until 1963.    

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I wonder how long it ran? Lindsay and Crouse definitely in the late stages of their career...

 

 

I looked it up. It ran for 4 months.

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I wonder how long it ran? Russell and Crouse definitely in the late stages of their career...

 

 

I looked it up. It ran for 4 months.

 

Yes, there were 108 performances from late January to early May. Here's the link for the production, found on the Internet Broadway Database:

 

https://www.ibdb.com/broadway-production/tall-story-2069

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I guess everyone doesn't know that that the '60s' as a cultural benchmark didn't really start until 1963.    

 

True. While 1966 films represent the true changeover of cinema to a whole new era markedly different from the restrained, careful, glamour product for which Hollywood had been known, the genesis of that belonged to late '63 I think. The Beatles and the JFK assassination were harbingers of an entirely new world beginning - a world of lost naivety.

 

The first true movie of the 60's in that vein was perhaps Carl Foreman's 'The Victors' (1963). 

 

The spirit of the 60's would continue right through to about the end of 1972.

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If I'm remembering correctly, Joshua Logan was Jane Fonda's godfather.

 

I think that "Tall Story" was his attempt to get her into the movies.

 

Of course, he was acquainted with Tony Perkins through his replacing John Kerr in "Tea and Sympathy".

 

And, possibly, through his father, Osgood Perkins.

 

Little did Tony Perkins realize that his next film, "Psycho", would revolutionize his screen image.

 

 

 

d0bd1c7b53a037dbef3918a7119ee7a3--anthon

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Did anyone watch Tall Story??? What a BAD movie.. You'd think you were watching a film about college in the 30s, not the 60s. That Jane Fonda survived this "debut" is remarkable. Wonder if this came out before or after Psycho (released the same year).

I didn't, but I've heard the movie was extremely cheesy. And not in a good way.

 

When Tony rehearsed with Jane Fonda in her dressing room during filming, she took off all her clothes and sat suggestively powdering her body while Tony hid his face in panic behind his script. Once she discovered Tony was gay, she stopped trying to seduce him. This story was either confirmed by Jane Fonda herself or Tab Hunter.

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I didn't, but I've heard the movie was extremely cheesy. And not in a good way.

 

When Tony rehearsed with Jane Fonda in her dressing room during filming, she took off all her clothes and sat suggestively powdering her body while Tony hid his face in panic behind his script. Once she discovered Tony was gay, she stopped trying to seduce him. This story was either confirmed by Jane Fonda herself or Tab Hunter.

 

 

LOL.

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I didn't, but I've heard the movie was extremely cheesy. And not in a good way.

 

When Tony rehearsed with Jane Fonda in her dressing room during filming, she took off all her clothes and sat suggestively powdering her body while Tony hid his face in panic behind his script. Once she discovered Tony was gay, she stopped trying to seduce him. This story was either confirmed by Jane Fonda herself or Tab Hunter.

In her early acting years, she traveled with a gay acting coach, who rehearsed her scenes with her and then told her how to do them.

 

To see how offensive she must've been to work with, watch closely Peter Finch's ****-off performance in "In The Cool Of The Day".

 

The problem with "Tall Story" - other than that the material is bad - is that Tony Perkins does not respond favorably to the material.

 

11687382276.jpg

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In her early acting years, she traveled with a gay acting coach, who rehearsed her scenes with her and then told her how to do them.

 

To see how offensive she must've been to work with, watch closely Peter Finch's ****-off performance in "In The Cool Of The Day".

 

The problem with "Tall Story" - other than that the material is bad - is that Tony Perkins does not respond favorably to the material.

 

11687382276.jpg

 

 

So he was gay? I didnt know that. Cant remember his name. He was her guru for awhile in her early acting days..........

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Andreas Voutsinas?

 

 

YES. That's him. I knew it began with a V. It was thought at the time they were lovers......

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Fonda doesn't go into much detail about him in her autobio, but I believe Patricia Bosworth interviewed him for her book about Jane (I haven't read that one).....

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Fonda doesn't go into much detail about him in her autobio, but I believe Patricia Bosworth interviewed him for her book about Jane (I haven't read that one).....

 

 

Is this a recent book? (Bosworth)

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Thanks. I looked it up on Amazon. Hadnt heard of this book. I've liked the other books by Bosworth I've read, so I put a hold on a library copy.

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Thanks. I looked it up on Amazon. Hadnt heard of this book. I've liked the other books by Bosworth I've read, so I put a hold on a library copy.

Here it is -

 

51ImSrObAvL._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

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Strangely, tonight, TCM is showing three of Tony Perkins' box-office disasters -

 

"Five Miles to Midnight" - after making "Goodbye Again" with Tony Perkins, the director, Anatole Litvak, wanted to work with him again - Litvak, hoping for more of Perkins' ambiguity, cast him against type as the film's villain - Perkins who had already worked with Loren in "Desire Under The Elms" was very eager to work with her again - he felt that she was going to be a big, big star - a great deal was made about not revealing the film's ending a la "Psycho" - and, indeed, it is a deeply disquieting ending - on the film, Perkins was very friendly with little Thomas Norden, who had appeared with Perkins in the Broadway musical, "Greenwillow" - yes, it is little Thomas Norden who, in the film,  could so easily bring Perkins down

 

 

"Phaedra" - believe it or not, this one is a very modern update of Euripides' famed tragedy of love and lust, "Hippolyptus" - the director, Jules Dassin, had wanted Perkins for the role of the professor in "Never On Sunday", but could not afford him and had to play the role himself - Perkins had become friendly with Jules Dassin and Melina Mercouri on the set of "Goodbye Again" - they really got to know him and want him for her stepson/lover - Mercouri even said that if she had to choose between Perkins and Raf Vallone, she would choose Perkins without any hesitation - on this one, Perkins brought along his male lover, Teno Pollick, a young actor who had scored on Broadway - the love scene, nude and heated, competes with Perkins' car crash death as the unforgettable hightlight of the movie

 

"Green Mansions" - originally written by Allan Jay Lerner - Rima only spoke in birdsong - and intended for Vincente Minnelli and Pier Angeli, this one finally found itself in the hands of actor Mel Ferrer, who wanted to direct and his wife, Audrey Hepburn, who wanted a challenge - Perkins wanted to work in the film alongside Hepburn and turned down a role in "Some Like It Hot" - but, along the way, Perkins felt that he was wrong for the role and sought help from actor/acting guru, Jeff Corey - actor Henry Silva who felt that the part called for a Stewart Granger type, tried to guide Perkins toward a more masculine take in their big fight scene together - time has been very kind to this film - because as a piece of outright romantic fantasy, it has become pure magic - and together, Perkins and Hepburn are right

 

Tony Perkins became a major star in France due to his perceived "effeminancy", which was seen as a highly attractive quality in the country and was rightly qualified as "a unique appeal".

 

5143k14cbfL.jpg

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Rayban, I agree that Hepburn and Perkins make a fine romantic couple. Too bad Green Mansions wasn't directed by, say, Frank Borzage in his prime.

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