Sign in to follow this  
LawrenceA

Recently Watched Horror

121 posts in this topic

The Hatred (2017) - Supernatural horror film undone by poor story structure and uninspired characters, from Anchor Bay and writer-director Michael G. Kehoe. College student Regan (Sarah Davenport) travels out to the country with three of her school buddies to spend the weekend babysitting their professor's young daughter Irene (Shae Smolik). Once the young ladies arrive they discover that the big house that the professor has recently moved into may be haunted with vengeful spirits. Also featuring Gabrielle Bourne, Bayley Corman, Alisha Wainwright, Darby Walker, Andrew Divoff, Nina Siemaszko, David Naughton, Amanda Wyss, and Musetta Vander.

The typical structure of these sorts of movies involves the protagonists (and the audience) dealing with an unknown menace whose backstory is only learned in a late-in-the-tale information dump or piecemeal through their detective work. Not so here, as the film's first 20+ minutes are a lengthy prologue showing who is responsible for the supernatural problems later in the story, and why. The end result of setting things up that way is a genuine lack of mystery or suspense. The young women (and one kid) protagonists are all blandly pretty looks-wise and pretty bland personality-wise. There are a handful of creepy shots scattered in the film's final 15 minutes, but the ending itself is an anticlimactic letdown.

I got this movie after seeing the terrific trailer for it before another movie. I wasn't surprised to see that the trailer had even been nominated for an award. But the film itself is pure cable-or-skip-it material.  (4/10)

Source: Anchor Bay Blu-Ray.

hatred-interview.jpg?w=640

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The Blood on Satan's Claw" (1971) atmospheric period horror.  The discovery of a weird remains lead to an epidemic of madness, sexual hysteria and murder.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, jaragon said:

"The Blood on Satan's Claw" (1971) atmospheric period horror.  The discovery of a weird remains lead to an epidemic of madness, sexual hysteria and murder.

Don't you just hate it when that happens?  :D

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/23/2017 at 9:47 PM, LawrenceA said:

The Hatred (2017) - Supernatural horror film undone by poor story structure and uninspired characters, from Anchor Bay and writer-director Michael G. Kehoe. College student Regan (Sarah Davenport) travels out to the country with three of her school buddies to spend the weekend babysitting their professor's young daughter Irene (Shae Smolik). Once the young ladies arrive they discover that the big house that the professor has recently moved into may be haunted with vengeful spirits. Also featuring Gabrielle Bourne, Bayley Corman, Alisha Wainwright, Darby Walker, Andrew Divoff, Nina Siemaszko, David Naughton, Amanda Wyss, and Musetta Vander.

The typical structure of these sorts of movies involves the protagonists (and the audience) dealing with an unknown menace whose backstory is only learned in a late-in-the-tale information dump or piecemeal through their detective work. Not so here, as the film's first 20+ minutes are a lengthy prologue showing who is responsible for the supernatural problems later in the story, and why. The end result of setting things up that way is a genuine lack of mystery or suspense. The young women (and one kid) protagonists are all blandly pretty looks-wise and pretty bland personality-wise. There are a handful of creepy shots scattered in the film's final 15 minutes, but the ending itself is an anticlimactic letdown.

I got this movie after seeing the terrific trailer for it before another movie. I wasn't surprised to see that the trailer had even been nominated for an award. But the film itself is pure cable-or-skip-it material.  (4/10)

Source: Anchor Bay Blu-Ray.

hatred-interview.jpg?w=640

I agree- the first twenty minutes with the creepy father seems to be a self contained short- the rest of the film with the girls in peril from some supernatural force is a different story.  If the script had cross cut between the two it might have been a more effective thriller. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Devil-Doll (1936) - Strange science-fiction horror thriller from MGM and director Tod Browning. Disgraced Parisian banker Paul Lavond (Lionel Barrymore) escapes from prison where he's been sentenced after being framed by his former business partners. He follows fellow inmate Marcel (Henry B. Walthall) back to the latter's mad scientist laboratory, where he and his partner Malita (Rafaela Ottiano) have been conducting experiments that allow living creatures to be shrunken to the size of dolls while also rendering them compliant to the commands of others. Lavond and Malita travel back to Paris, where Lavond, in the guise of an old woman dollmaker, plots revenge against those who betrayed him, as well as trying to reconnect with his estranged daughter (Maureen O'Sullivan). Also featuring Frank Lawton, Arthur Hohl, Robert Greig, Lucy Beaumont, Pedro de Cordoba, King Baggot, Billy Gilbert, and E. Alyn Warren.

This bizarre story, with such outlandish touches as Barrymore in old-lady drag, is pure vintage Browning. Lionel seems to be having a hoot with the whole thing, while Ottiano makes for a great crippled assistant. Maybe not enough is done with the doll-making technique as could have, but I like what's there, anyway. Among the many credited screenwriters is Erich von Stroheim.  (7/10)

Source: Warner Archive DVD, part of the Hollywood Legends of Horror Collection.

DevilDoll5-e1482849295584.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dracula's Daughter (1936) - Moody, belated sequel to 1931's Dracula, from Universal Pictures and director Lambert Hillyer. Picking up almost immediately after the ending of the prior film, vampire hunter Professor Von (sic) Helsing is arrested by police after being found standing over the staked corpse of Count Dracula. Scotland Yard enlists noted psychologist Dr. Jeffrey Garth (Otto Kruger) to ascertain whether Von helsing is crazy, since he keeps talking about the undead. Meanwhile, the mysterious Countess Marya Zaleska (Gloria Holden) arrives in London and, with the assistance of her valet Sandor (Irving Pichel), makes off with Dracula's body. It seems she's the old count's "daughter", and as such is also a vampire, and she soon becomes convinced that Dr. Garth's psychological techniques may be able to cure her of her unholy desires. Also featuring Marguerite Churchill, Gilbert Emery, Halliwell Hobbes, E.E. Clive, Nan Grey, Claud Allister, and Hedda Hopper.

This expensive (for Universal) production was fraught with problems. James Whale was initially contracted to write and direct, but his script proved too "outrageous", so his script was rewritten (although shades of his sensibility still pop up here and there) and he was replaced by A. Edward Sutherland. When pre-production dragged on, Sutherland also left, and Hillyer was made director shortly before filming began. Lugosi was originally set to return, with a substantial role, but he asked for too much money and the story was rewritten to remove his character. I'm not sure why the Professor character's name was changed from "Van" Helsing (which is Dutch, and fits with the Stoker character) to the more German "Von" Helsing for this sequel. 

There's a lot I like in this movie, despite its inconsistent tone and pacing. I like Holden as the tormented Zaleska, which is one of the earliest depictions of vampirism as a romantic curse rather than a monstrous evil devoid of conscience. I also like character actor and sometime director Pichel as the odd manservant Sandor, who seems more interesting than most horror character sidekicks. This movie proved to be the last Laemmle family horror production, as they were forced out of the company shortly after production concluded.   (7/10)

Source: Universal Blu-Ray, part of the Dracula: The Complete Legacy Collection. The HD remastering on this title is phenomenal, resulting in one of the sharpest, most flawless prints of a movie from this era that I've seen.

draculas-daughter.jpg?fit=646,499

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Invisible Ray (1936) - More macabre happenings from Universal Pictures and director Lambert Hillyer. Boris Karloff is Dr. Janos Rukh, a brilliant yet obsessive scientist who has just discovered "radium X", a new element with fantastic power. He informs some colleagues, including medical doctor Benet (Bela Lugosi), Sir Francis Stevens (Walter Kingsford), Lady Stevens (Beulah Bondi), and their nephew Ronald Drake (Frank Lawton), and together they organize a safari to Darkest Africa to search for a possible deposit of the miracle element. Joining them is Rukh's neglected wife Diane (Frances Drake), who reluctantly falls in love with young Ronald. Meanwhile, Janos does discover the deposit of radium X, which he uses to fuel a deadly disintegration ray, while also inadvertently radiating himself so that his touch becomes deadly. After Dr. Benet and Sir Francis take some radium X back to Europe in order to use it in a constructive manner, and Diane leaves to be with Ronald, Janos vows deadly revenge on them all. Also featuring Violet Kember Cooper, Frank Reicher, Paul Weiger, and Nydia Westman.

This one is more science fiction than horror, but it still has some creepy touches, such as Karloff glowing in the dark. Bela gets to be a good guy again, and he cuts a fine figure with his devilish goatee. Karloff on the other hand looks a bit goofy, with a curly black wig, bushy black mustache, and padded shoulders in some scenes for no discernible reason. Drake is lovely to look at, but she doesn't have a lot to do other than look sad or worried. There's enough weirdness here to hold one's interest, and the pacing is good.  (7/10)

Source: Universal Vault DVD.

HILLYER-1936-The-Invisible-Ray-El-poder-

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Dracula's Daughter (1936) - Moody, belated sequel to 1931's Dracula, from Universal Pictures and director Lambert Hillyer. Picking up almost immediately after the ending of the prior film, vampire hunter Professor Von (sic) Helsing is arrested by police after being found standing over the staked corpse of Count Dracula. Scotland Yard enlists noted psychologist Dr. Jeffrey Garth (Otto Kruger) to ascertain whether Von helsing is crazy, since he keeps talking about the undead. Meanwhile, the mysterious Countess Marya Zaleska (Gloria Holden) arrives in London and, with the assistance of her valet Sandor (Irving Pichel), makes off with Dracula's body. It seems she's the old count's "daughter", and as such is also a vampire, and she soon becomes convinced that Dr. Garth's psychological techniques may be able to cure her of her unholy desires. Also featuring Marguerite Churchill, Gilbert Emery, Halliwell Hobbes, E.E. Clive, Nan Grey, Claud Allister, and Hedda Hopper.

This expensive (for Universal) production was fraught with problems. James Whale was initially contracted to write and direct, but his script proved too "outrageous", so his script was rewritten (although shades of his sensibility still pop up here and there) and he was replaced by A. Edward Sutherland. When pre-production dragged on, Sutherland also left, and Hillyer was made director shortly before filming began. Lugosi was originally set to return, with a substantial role, but he asked for too much money and the story was rewritten to remove his character. I'm not sure why the Professor character's name was changed from "Van" Helsing (which is Dutch, and fits with the Stoker character) to the more German "Von" Helsing for this sequel. 

There's a lot I like in this movie, despite its inconsistent tone and pacing. I like Holden as the tormented Zaleska, which is one of the earliest depictions of vampirism as a romantic curse rather than a monstrous evil devoid of conscience. I also like character actor and sometime director Pichel as the odd manservant Sandor, who seems more interesting than most horror character sidekicks. This movie proved to be the last Laemmle family horror production, as they were forced out of the company shortly after production concluded.   (7/10)

Source: Universal Blu-Ray, part of the Dracula: The Complete Legacy Collection. The HD remastering on this title is phenomenal, resulting in one of the sharpest, most flawless prints of a movie from this era that I've seen.

draculas-daughter.jpg?fit=646,499

Holden gives a haunting performance too bad Universal did not bring back the character

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Return of Dr. X (1939) - Lurid, often silly but entertaining horror thriller from Warner Brothers and director Vincent Sherman. Newspaper reporter Walter (Wayne Morris) and his pal young doctor Michael (Dennis Morgan) try to solve a series of mysterious murders. They may have some connection to a blood study being done by imperious surgeon Dr. Flegg (John Litel) and his very strange assistant Quesne (Humphrey Bogart). Also featuring Rosemary Lane, Lya Lys, Charles C. Wilson, Vera Lewis, Olin Howland, and Huntz Hall.

This film has gone on to cinematic infamy due to future star Bogart's unusual role as a pasty-faced mad scientist/zombie vampire. The movie was originally intended to be a sequel to 1932's Doctor X, but the studio went with a wholly original story. They still managed to have the title make sense, though. Busy character actor Litel looks very different with his satanic beard and monocle. Morris and Morgan make for decent B-movie heroes. I like this one a little better each time I see it, and beyond just the Bogart-as-monster novelty.   (6/10)

Source: Warner Archive DVD, part of the Hollywood Legends of Horror Collection. The only bonus feature is an audio commentary track featuring a film historian, as well as the movie's director, Vincent Sherman.

Return-of-Doctor-X-1.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Son of Frankenstein (1939) - Third outing from Universal Pictures and director Rowland V. Lee. Baron Wolf von Frankenstein (Basil Rathbone) inherits his family's ancestral castle, the same location where Wolf's father did his experimentation with reviving the dead many years ago. After Wolf and his wife and young son take up residence, they discover that the old castle has another resident, strange cripple Ygor (Bela Lugosi). Ygor had been sentenced to death for grave robbing many years ago, but his hanging was botched and it left him with a crooked neck. Ygor has a secret as well: he found the Monster (Boris Karloff) in a series of caves beneath the castle, and he's nursed him back to health. However, Ygor needs Wolf's medical expertise fully revive the Monster. Also featuring Lionel Atwill, Josephine Hutchinson, Donnie Dunagan, Emma Dunn, Edgar Norton, Lionel Belmore, and Gustav von Seyffertitz.

I've always considered this the beginning of Universal's Phase Two in their monster films, where they started to get progressively sillier, adding lots of additional weird characters, ultimately leading up to the monster mash-ups of the mid-40's. Director Lee brings a lot of style to the proceedings, and the throwback German Expressionism set design is a treat. The performances are good, although Boris is given a lot less to do, and one can see why tired of the part. Lugosi has one of his more iconic roles as the vengeance-seeking Ygor. Atwill, as the local police inspector with a prosthetic arm, is also memorable. Rathbone seems to have fun, with a winking performance that has tongue in cheek. Hutchinson fails to make much of an impression, and whether you find young Dunagan cute or annoying will depend on your mood.   (7/10)

Source: Universal Blu-ray, part of the Frankenstein Complete Legacy Collection. The picture looks amazingly good, but there are no film-specific bonus features.

son_frankenstein-5.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Son of Frankenstein is a bridge between the first two flicks and the "progressively sillier" (as LawrenceA calls them) ones later on.  You've got the really great sets and Karloff (in the woolen pullover that no one ever explains - did Ygor get it for him?) but he doesn't do a lot in the film, as Lawrence and others have noted, and that starts the trend where he is just a lumbering around monster soon to be a subordinate character where the emphasis shifts to the Wolf Man, crazy doctors, pretty women, hunchbacks and even Dracula.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Satanic (2016) - Stupid and dull horror thriller from Magnet and director Jeffrey Hunt. 4 dumb young people on their way to the Coachella music festival decide to stop off in L.A. for a tour of true-crime locations. They stumble upon a group of Satan worshipers, and when they provide help to their intended ritual victim, it curses them all. Featuring Sarah Hyland, Steven Krueger, Justin Chon, Clara Mamet, and Sophie Dalah.

A dumb plot + poor pacing + bad performances = a sad time at the movies. This may be spoilerish but I will say that the movie becomes a supernatural thriller, and it isn't just a dumb "run from the cultists" retread. The cast includes a star of TV's Modern Family, and the daughter of playwright David Mamet. Avoid this one.  (3/10)

Source: Netflix.

270998.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Vault (2017) - Uneven mash-up of bank heist crime drama and supernatural horror, from FilmRise and director Dan Bush. Five bank robbers hit a small midtown L.A.bank at closing time, taking the employees and remaining customer hostage. After the robbers discover a rather meager amount of cash on hand, a helpful assistant manager (James Franco) tells them about another, secret vault, hidden on one of the floors below. The only problem is that the vault is haunted by malevolent spirits. Also starring Francesca Eastwood, Taryn Manning, Clifton Collins Jr., Q'orianka Kilcher, Jeff Gum, Keith Loneker, Michael Milford, and Conal Byrne.

There are some creepy visuals on display here, but the script lacks momentum, and sputters out after the 30 minute mark, with only occasional fits of activity, despite the increasing number of loud and flashy scenes. The ghostly menace is sometimes scary, but more often of the modern "poseur" type of cliched imagery, wide-eyed and head tilted. The cast is better than the material, although Taryn Manning is more than a little irritating as a manic bank robber. Eastwood, the daughter of Clint and former wife Frances Fisher, has a nice husky voice and a great face, but the script doesn't give her enough to really shine. There's a "twist" regarding one central character that should be obvious to most viewers fairly quickly.  (5/10)

Source: Netflix.

TheVault-Banniere.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Satanic (2016) - Stupid and dull horror thriller from Magnet and director Jeffrey Hunt. 4 dumb young people on their way to the Coachella music festival decide to stop off in L.A. for a tour of true-crime locations. They stumble upon a group of Satan worshipers, and when they provide help to their intended ritual victim, it curses them all. Featuring Sarah Hyland, Steven Krueger, Justin Chon, Clara Mamet, and Sophie Dalah.

A dumb plot + poor pacing + bad performances = a sad time at the movies. This may be spoilerish but I will say that the movie becomes a supernatural thriller, and it isn't just a dumb "run from the cultists" retread. The cast includes a star of TV's Modern Family, and the daughter of playwright David Mamet. Avoid this one.  (3/10)

Source: Netflix.

270998.jpg

The poster looks like crap

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hellraiser: Judgment (2018) - Tenth (!!!) installment of the supernatural horror series, originally based on works by Clive Barker, from Dimension Films and writer-director Gary J. Tunnicliffe. Cops Sean (Damon Carney) and David (Randy Wayne) search for a serial killer known as the Preceptor, but their investigation takes them to the very gates of Hell. Also featuring Alexandra Harris, Jeff Fenter, Rheagan Wallace, John Gulager, Heather Langenkamp, and Paul T. Taylor as Pinhead.

When it comes to these long-running horror franchises, the rights-holding studios have to make at least one new film every few years or risk losing the rights. This results in some truly awful films, cheaply made and rushed through production just to beat a deadline and meet a legal requirement. This is just such a movie, as have been the last several in this once-groundbreaking series. The first two films rank among the best horror films of all time, but starting with the third (when Dimension Films starting producing them) they've gotten progressively worse. This newest film may be a tiny bit better than the atrocious previous entry (2011's Hellraiser: Revelations), but it's still terrible, with vague characterizations, bored performances, and a distinct cheapness to the production that undercuts some of the attempts at world-building. This story attempts to expand a bit on the bureaucracy of Hell as hinted at in the second film, namely with new character The Auditor, played by the director. He actually gets more screentime than series hallmark Pinhead, although he's not as impressive, and looks like the hell-cops from Highway to Hell (1991). In summary, all but the most die-hard fans should avoid this often-dull, pretentious, and disgusting latest movie in the series.   (4/10)

Source: Lionsgate DVD.

taypinlead.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before I Wake (2016) - Mediocre dark fantasy with horror elements, from Netflix and director Mike Flanagan. Married couple Jessie (Kate Bosworth) and Mark (Thomas Jane) lost their son in a terrible accident some time ago. To help move forward, they've decided to become foster parents to young Cody (Jacob Tremblay), a nice boy who has inexplicably gone through several foster families. Things seem great at first, but Jessie and Mark are astounded to discover that whenever Cody dreams, the things in his dream manifest in reality. This includes glowing butterflies and Christmas trees. However, if the things from his dreams become real, what about the creatures from his nightmares? Also featuring Annabeth Gish, Dash Mihok, Jay Karnes, Scottie Thompson, and Courtney Bell.

This is professionally slick, with nice widescreen cinematography and good special effects. The performances are good, particularly from young Tremblay, who some may know from Room. I'm not too keen on Bosworth, but her natural aloofness fits her part here. I wasn't crazy about the last quarter of the film, though, as it looks a bit cheesy, and it gets really bogged down in touchy-feely emotional territory.  (6/10)

Source: Netflix.

file_604757_before-i-wake-trailer.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gore Verbinski creates a beautiful designed sci-fi horror movie in "A Cure For Wellness" (2017) Lockhart ( Dane DerHaan) goes to a  Bavarian health resort in search of his missing boss; there he meets the mysterious frail Hannah ( Mia Goth) who suffers from some unnamed illness, the sinister Dr Volmer (Jason Isaacs) who has a terrible secret and some nasty eels.  DeHaan ( who looks a bit like a young Leonardo Di Caprio) is submitted to some horrifying medical procedures until he finally uncovers the truth.  Verbinski had the money to create an elaborate world for his story which could have been shorter but if you are in the mood for a dream like horror you will enjoy it just watch out for those eels

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Demonic (2015) - Supernatural thriller undone by an overly confused narrative, from Dimension Films and director Will Canon. Louisiana detective Mark Lewis (Frank Grillo) is responding to a noise complaint at an infamous, abandoned house, only to discover several dead bodies and one survivor who is terribly shaken. While police converge on the scene to investigate, Detective Lewis and psychologist Elizabeth Klein (Maria Bello) try interrogating the survivor, John (Dustin Milligan), who relate his story of being one of group paranormal investigators who came to the house to learn more about a series of bizarre murders years ago. Also featuring Cody Horn, Scott Mechlowicz, Aaron Yoo, Alex Goode, and Megan Park.

The story flips back and forth between the present police investigation and flashbacks to John and his associates exploring the house. Unfortunately this robs the movie of much of its suspense, especially considering that the viewers already know what happens to most of the characters from the first scenes. There are some nice, creepy shots here and there, but not a lot of originality. Grillo and Bello seem to be slumming here, while the cast young people don't make a big impression; I had trouble telling two of the guys apart, as they were both skinny, pasty white dudes with the same dark haircut. The film's final revelations call into question the point of a lot of what you just watched, and not in a good way.   (5/10)

Source: Netflix.

Demonic.jpg?format=300w

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Ritual (2017) - Surprisingly good British supernatural thriller from Entertainment One and director David Bruckner. Four friends take a hiking trip through Swedish hill country to honor the memory of a dead comrade. When they decide to take a shortcut through the forests in order to get back to lodging faster, they encounter things beyond comprehension. Starring Rafe Spall, Sam Troughton, Arsher Ali, Robert James-Collier, and Paul Reid.

This is a slow burn, starting out as a well-acted, if somewhat familiar, suspense movie about people getting lost in the woods. However, it soon starts getting more interesting, and while I don't want to spoil things, it goes places I wasn't expecting, moving fully into supernatural territory in a way that isn't seen enough. I ended up finding this the most enjoyable horror entry that I've seen in quite a while. Recommended.  (8/10)

Source: Netflix.

The-Ritual.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Ritual (2017) - Surprisingly good British supernatural thriller from Entertainment One and director David Bruckner. Four friends take a hiking trip through Swedish hill country to honor the memory of a dead comrade. When they decide to take a shortcut through the forests in order to get back to lodging faster, they encounter things beyond comprehension. Starring Rafe Spall, Sam Troughton, Arsher Ali, Robert James-Collier, and Paul Reid.

This is a slow burn, starting out as a well-acted, if somewhat familiar, suspense movie about people getting lost in the woods. However, it soon starts getting more interesting, and while I don't want to spoil things, it goes places I wasn't expecting, moving fully into supernatural territory in a way that isn't seen enough. I ended up finding this the most enjoyable horror entry that I've seen in quite a while. Recommended.  (8/10)

Source: Netflix.

The-Ritual.jpg

I need to check it out that shot reminds me of "Dreamcatcher"

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

" The Open House" (2018) this one starts as an effective psychological thriller before turning into an unpleasant exercise in torture porn.  Dylan Minette plays Logan a high school runner who witnesses the accidental death of his father.  His real state selling aunt lets Logan and his mother Naomi ( Piercy Dalton) move into a luxurious mountain chalet but there is one catch. The property is for sale and they must leave the house so that prospective clients can visit.  The first hour has plenty of suspense and chills as the mother and son realize that someone stalking them. Could it be the noisy next door neighbor? The store owner? Or just some psycho who stayed behind after open house?  I hated the third act which like a lot of lazy modern horror film becomes an exercise in bloody cruelty. Minette deserves better. He is a good young actor excellent in both comedy "Goosebumps" and better made horror films like " Don't Breath"

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indigenous (2014) - Lackluster creature feature from Kilburn Media and director Alastair Orr. A group stupid and beautiful young people take a vacation to the beaches of Panama. When they hear tales of a forbidden waterfall in the nearby jungle, they ignore the locals' warnings and venture out for it anyway. Their tropical trek leads them to the bloodthirsty jaws of the Cupacabra, a humanoid monster who preys on humans. Featuring Zachary Soetenga, Lindsey McKeon, Sofia Pernas, Pierson Fode, Jamie Anderson, Juanxo Villaverde, and Laura Penuela.

Most of the film is dedicated to lingering close ups of the model-perfect bods of the cast in various forms of undress. When things finally get around to the monster, it's strictly routine, with the protagonists making loads of dumb decisions and the creature behaving in ways that seem ridiculous. Things get a little original with a late-in-the-story twist involving social media, but not enough to make this worthwhile to slog through. The creature, though only fleetingly glimpsed in full, is well done.  (4/10)

Source: Netflix.

24727004472578836528.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Condemned (2015) - Truly atrocious horror (comedy?) from RLJ Entertainment and writer-director Eli Morgan Gesner. Suburban rich girl Maya (Dylan Penn) runs away from home to stay with her struggling punk rock musician boyfriend Dante (Ronen Rubinstein). She begins having second thoughts when she sees where he lives: a condemned, multi-story apartment complex with all sorts of squalid squatters in residence. Thanks to a chemical mixture accidentally concocted by the top-floor drug chemist, an illness soon breaks out, afflicting some of the residents and making them homicidal. If that wasn't bad enough, they've all been locked inside the building with no obvious means of escape. Also featuring Genevieve Hudson-Price, Honor Titus, Kevin Smith Kirkwood, Lydia Hearst, Jon Abrahams, Perry Yung, Jordan Gelber, Anthony Chisholm, Nick Damici, Michael DeMello, and Johnny Messner.

Dumb and cheap, this spends over half its 80 minute runtime getting to know the cast of characters: beyond the main couple of protagonists, these consist of crazy shut-ins, drug addicts, a drug manufacturer, and a pair of gay S & M Nazis. There's no real suspense or scares, only slimy gross-out scenes of bursting pustules and bargain-basement gore effects. The director attempts a number of film-school flourishes that add nothing, while the cast ranges from bad to worse. The cast features a couple of unusuals, though: lead Dylan Penn is the daughter of Sean Penn and Robin Wright, while Lydia Hearst, here playing a former-model-turned junkie, is the daughter of Patty Hearst.  (2/10)

Source: Netflix.

condemned-dvd-cover.jpg?w=470 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Babysitter (2017) - Obnoxious horror comedy from Netflix and director McG. 12-year-old misfit Cole (Judah Lewis) is the only kid his age who still has a babysitter. But what a babysitter she is! Bee (Samara Weaving) is beautiful, funny, playful, and extremely kind to Cole. Cole decides that on her next overnight babysitting job (his parents are out of town a lot) that he will secretly stay up past his bed time to see what Bee does after he's asleep. However, Cole is in for a shock when he learns that Bee is the leader of a satanic cult that indulges in human sacrifice and who need his innocent blood for their latest ritual. Also featuring Robbie Amell, Hana Mae Lee, Bella Thorne, Emily Alyn Lind, Andrew Bachelor, Leslie Bibb, and Ken Marino.

There are a lot of flashy camera and editing tricks, a frenetic pace, lots of pop culture references and ridiculous amounts of blood. It's all undone by a terrible script that doesn't make sense, with characters behaving inconsistently, cheap jokes that don't land, dumb and tired stereotyping, and a pretentious air of knowing-hipster-cool that isn't earned and in fact makes the whole thing seem more vacuous and pointless. I was shocked to read that the script made the Blacklist a few years back (an annual list of the supposed best unproduced screenplays in Hollywood). Perhaps what's on the page was better and the failures all came through on the execution. I also heard about this movie from a list of the "best new horror films" that was posted sometime last year around Halloween. If that's the case, then the genre is in a really bad place. I've seen worse (just last night, in fact: see Condemned above), but this was a real disappointment and a waste of time.   (3/10)

Source: Netflix.

undefined_29bd74e544356b1d536700c6f2f727

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us