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papyrusbeetle

Raymond Burr just keeps amazing me

10 posts in this topic

MV5BYjc0OTQ5MTktNjU1Yy00NzE2LWI1YWMtNDU3YTUwN2UxOWEwL2ltYWdlXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMTE2NzA0Ng@@__V1_.thumb.jpg.8cbe1c67b25ab32c77946a5d7a3aeedd.jpgOf course, he RULED television series as "Perry Mason" and "Ironside".

But his "noir" films are pretty wonderful. And he is unforgettable in these great triumphs in black and white!

DESPERATE (1947) not a mobster to get on the wrong side of

RAW DEAL (1948) a mobster fascinated with fire, who dumps cherries jubilee on his girlfriend

WALK A CROOKED MILE (1948) - A communist--enough said?

BRIDE OF THE GORILLA (1951) - passionate scenes with gorgeous, doomed Barbara Payton

BLUE GARDENIA (1953) - a eager playboy who dumped the WRONG woman!

REAR WINDOW (1954) - pathetic neighbor across the courtyard from Jimmy Stewart

CRY IN THE NIGHT (1956) - he plays the creepy dangerous massive "mama's boy" who finds Natalie Wood irresistible

CRIME OF PASSION (1957) - he learns the hard way not to turn his back on Barbara Stanwyck

 

 

 

 

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Don't forget Burr's performance in the noir His Kind of Women (with stars Mitchum and Russell).

Burr plays a character that is even more sadistic than the one in Raw Deal.     

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2 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Also, he plays despicable characters in PITFALL (1948) and RED LIGHT (1949).

My hatred for Burr's character in "Pitfall" almost rivals my past hatred for Stanwyck's "Strange Love of Martha Ivers." 

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On 10/28/2017 at 9:06 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

My hatred for Burr's character in "Pitfall" almost rivals my past hatred for Stanwyck's "Strange Love of Martha Ivers." 

What is interesting about the character Burr plays in Pitfall,  is that he is a fairly normal guy,  mentally.   I.e. one using any means possible to achieve a sexual relationship with a good looking women.  

I say 'normal' as compare to the sadistic characters he played in His Kind of Women and Raw Deal;  These guys were sadistic psychos,   while the guy in Pitfall wasn't (just a sociopath).     This makes the ending all the more interesting because Scott may face charges for killing him.     If the Burr character was a psycho like in those other films Scott wouldn't have been arrested.      

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wow---thanks for the info!

I can't even REMEMBER raymond burr in PITFALL.

The whole movie (IMHO) revolves around Lizabeth Scott, her cute clothes, and the tagline:

 A man can be as strong as steel...but somewhere there's a woman who'll break him!

 

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I rarely think very much about Burr's characters or his performances. I agree he was a fine talent. But he always impressed me rather negatively; with his huge bulk, fleshy face, and protruding eyeballs.

And then a few years ago I ran across an anecdote about his real life which further soured me on him. A closeted homosexual, there was apparently an unpleasant incident on some movie set where he took such a intense ardor for some young male actor that it practically led (or was leading up to) male rape. Burr was stalking this kid; or pressuring him; or pursuing him. Making unwelcome advances. For a guy his size to lose control of himself that way...ugh.

I do like Burr's audio performances. He played the hard-as-nails Inspector Hellman in Jack Webb's "Pat Novak, for Hire" (the best radio noir ever) and Capt. Lee Quince in 'Fort Laramie'.

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I don't know, there is just something about Raymond Burr that's wonderful. I love to watch him--villain or hero.

As Alfred Hitchcock said (of him, I think, describing what it takes to be a great film actor)

He's extremely good at doing nothing at all.

(Maybe another poster can remember the exact quote.)

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Okay but in some cases you can't separate an actor from the man he is in private life. If Burr didn't have self-control over his perverse urges, if he harmed people--I sure won't watch him. Acting is an intimate craft--maybe the most intimate. You are showing your inner truths. Making us partake of them. Delivering them right into our brains. It's personal. So if your private life is corrupt, twisted, and malevolent, maybe don't become an actor.

Klaus Kinsky, Woody Allen--yes-- they are skirting the border too.

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