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LawrenceA

Recently Watched Cult/Exploitation/Grindhouse/Etc.

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Damaged Lives (1933) - Early entry in the VD health scare sub-genre of "adults only" educational films, produced by Harry Cohn's brother Nat at Columbia Pictures but released under the Weldon Pictures banner to provide some distance for the parent company. Workaholic Don Bradley Jr. (Lyman Williams) agrees to go to a nightclub dinner party where he meets bottle-blonde Elise (Charlotte Merriam). The two have a wild night of drinking and end up in the sack. Don feels guilty since he's engaged to marry nice girl Joan (Diane Sinclair), and the two decide to elope. Imagine Don's embarrassment when Elise contacts him some time later to inform him that she's tested positive for syphilis. Don hides his secret shame, but has he already passed it on to dear sweet Joan? Also featuring Jason Robards Sr., Marceline Day, Murray Kinnell, and George Irving.

This has all of the hallmarks of later films of the type: nice people brought to near ruin after a night's careless debauchery; a positive outlook after mostly doom and gloom; and a protracted sequence showing real cases of advanced venereal disease patients in all of their grotesque horror. The copy I watched ran a scant 53 minutes, but IMDb lists it as having a 64 minute run time, and another source lists 74 minutes, so most likely it depends on how much of the really graphic footage was cut from each print. This was produced in conjunction with the Canadian Social Health Council, and marked the ignominious American directing debut of Edgar G. Ulmer. He manages to add a couple of interesting visual touches that raise this above the crowd, but just barely.  (5/10)

Source: YouTube, a truly awful copy that straddles the line of unwatchability. Those interested in seeing this would do well to look elsewhere, as there appears to be a copy available from Something Weird video that is most likely in better condition.

FA_image_00021740.jpg

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WolfCop (2014) - Low budget Canadian horror comedy from writer-director Lowell Dean. Small-town sheriff's deputy Lou Garou (Leo Fafard) is a drunk and a loser, but after he gets kidnapped and subjected to an occult ritual by a band of masked cultists, he finds himself transforming into a super-strong werewolf. He uses his new-found beast power to fight crime, but the cultists aren't done with him yet. Also featuring Amy Matysio, Sarah Lind, Corinne Conley, Jesse Moss, Aidan Devine, and Jonathan Cherry.

A sort-of parody of high-concept 80's cop movies, this doesn't quite have the resources or the script to go as far as it needed to work. Not enough time is spent with the uniformed werewolf on patrol, instead devoting too much time to secondary characters and the cult's ulterior motives. At times it seems the movie starts to take itself too seriously, but then they devote a lengthy scene to the werewolf using an auto body shop to customize his police car with big metal "W" emblems and other such silliness. The cast of mostly unknowns is good, and despite its deficiencies this is better than most of the movies of similar budget level. A sequel, Another WolfCop, was released earlier this year.  (5/10)

Source: Image DVD.

WolfCop.jpg

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On 11/15/2017 at 2:36 PM, LawrenceA said:

WolfCop (2014) - Low budget Canadian horror comedy from writer-director Lowell Dean. Small-town sheriff's deputy Lou Garou (Leo Fafard) is a drunk and a loser, but after he gets kidnapped and subjected to an occult ritual by a band of masked cultists, he finds himself transforming into a super-strong werewolf. He uses his new-found beast power to fight crime, but the cultists aren't done with him yet. Also featuring Amy Matysio, Sarah Lind, Corinne Conley, Jesse Moss, Aidan Devine, and Jonathan Cherry.

A sort-of parody of high-concept 80's cop movies, this doesn't quite have the resources or the script to go as far as it needed to work. Not enough time is spent with the uniformed werewolf on patrol, instead devoting too much time to secondary characters and the cult's ulterior motives. At times it seems the movie starts to take itself too seriously, but then they devote a lengthy scene to the werewolf using an auto body shop to customize his police car with big metal "W" emblems and other such silliness. The cast of mostly unknowns is good, and despite its deficiencies this is better than most of the movies of similar budget level. A sequel, Another WolfCop, was released earlier this year.  (5/10)

Source: Image DVD.

WolfCop.jpg

Love the poster!

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