Bogie56

Your Favourite Foreign Language Films from 1933

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Apologies in advance as Triumph of the Will is my number one FF of 1935.  I first studied it in school as an industrial work of propaganda.  We also watched some Allied propaganda films.  If you can separate its subject matter from its form, TOTW is an astounding technical achievement.  With regards its subject matter it can be argued that as an industrial, the filmmaker was hired not only to document her client but to make him look good too.  And finally I might add that it is one of the most powerful horror films of all time.

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There are a myriad & too many to included here, but my all-timer is the wondrous 1989 "CINEMA, PARADISO" (Italy)  It belongs too in The Library of Congress!n& they really do a marvelkous job on this t

yearMy runners-up in any year & in no special order either, except "PARIDISO">

"Das Boot" (l982-German)-(winner of 6 statuettes  But tcm is cute

"La Strada"(l954-Italy)-(A weird arthouse film

Can you fellow TCM-ITES fathom,. I've yet to be able to see "Grande Illusion" though?

In no special order here 

 

"Triumph of the Will"/ "0lympia" ('37-Germany) (l934/35) & "Cinema, Paradiso" (l989) (there just too lousy. 2003 version & it $7m.)>

"Ran" (l985-Japanese)-(close to being the magnificent Akira Kurosawa's crowing achievement & the guy was almost blind when he made the superb WW2 epic anyway)

"Das Boot" (l982-German) (snagged 6 noms but at this stage can only pay for myself right now?)

& many more, but I must confess I'm, not a big foreign film & especially with subtitles & althoiugh I've been going to the new releases since I was an 17yr old boy, I STILL ALWAYS MUCH MORE PREFER HOLLYWOODS GLORIOUS GOLDEN AGE & STUDIO-SYSTEM-(1925-1960) BY FAR

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7 minutes ago, spence said:

There are a myriad & too many to included here, but my all-timer is the wondrous 1989 "CINEMA, PARADISO" (Italy)  It belongs too in The Library of Congress!n& they really do a marvelkous job on this t

Thanks for your post but the thread title refers to foreign language films from 1933.

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10 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Apologies in advance as Triumph of the Will is my number one FF of 1935.  I first studied it in school as an industrial work of propaganda.  We also watched some Allied propaganda films.  If you can separate its subject matter from its form, TOTW is an astounding technical achievement.  With regards its subject matter it can be argued that as an industrial, the filmmaker was hired not only to document her client but to make him look good too.  And finally I might add that it is one of the most powerful horror films of all time.

TotW will appear in my top three of '35, as well. I can appreciate the artistry and technical achievement without condoning the message of the material. Olympia will also rank highly for me. 

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20 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Apologies in advance as Triumph of the Will is my number one FF of 1935.  I first studied it in school as an industrial work of propaganda.  We also watched some Allied propaganda films.  If you can separate its subject matter from its form, TOTW is an astounding technical achievement.  With regards its subject matter it can be argued that as an industrial, the filmmaker was hired not only to document her client but to make him look good too.  And finally I might add that it is one of the most powerful horror films of all time.

No need for apologies. I understand her documentaries are impressive from a technical and cinematic viewpoint. Nothing wrong with pointing out the powerful cinematography behind it.

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15 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Thanks for your post but the thread title refers to foreign language films from 1933.

Not only that but it's been my No. #1 overall all-time favourite foreign-language film every yet made!!!

 

That yr the *AMPAS shoulda-(once again) be ashamed of itself in not nomination this wondrous film among the top 5 BP contenders

 

THAT FINALE & AS USUAL *ENNIO'S MAGNIFICENT & MAJESTIC SCORE ALWAYS GIVES ME THE CHILLS

 

It did however win as Best Foreign-Film at least

 

(TRIVIA: You decide the BP 1989 nominees were *"Driving Miss Daisy" (swept 4), 'Born on the 4th of July" (2), "Dead Poet's Society" (won 1), "Field of Dreams" (shut out) & "My Left Foot" won 2)

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The 1933 National Board of Review foreign language film winners included …

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Was Wissen Denn Manner (1933) Gerhard Lamprecht, Germany

Dawn/Morgenrot (1933) Vernon Sewell, Gustav Ucicky, Germany

Quatorze Juliet (1933) Rene Clair, France

 

The 1935 National Board of Review foreign language film winners included …

La Maternelle/Children of Montmarte (1933) Jean Benoit-Levy, Marie Epstein, France

 

The National Board of Review 1936 top foreign language films included ….

The Yellow Cruise (1933) Leon Poirier, Andre Sauvage, France

 

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Last June 13 I posted some observations on Victor and Viktoria (1933) in the I Just Watched Thread (page 289) in general discussions.  It was comparing three versions of this story.  V and V (1933), First a Girl (1935) and the more famous Blake Edwards version, Victor/Victoria (1982).

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Viktor and Viktoria (1933) is a German musical by Reinhold Schunzel and the first adaptation as far as I can tell as he has the writing credit.  Much of the film is either in song or spoken rhyme.  Briefly, it is the story of an aspiring singer named Susanne Lohr (Renate Muller) who meets a rather terrible actor named Viktor Hempel (Hermann Thimig).  Viktor has a drag queen act and when he comes down with a cold enlists Susanne to take his place.  Hence the story of a female impersonating a male impersonating a female.

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Adolf Wohlbruck plays the love interest in Viktor and Viktoria (1933).  He would later change his name to Anton Walbrook.  In this version he discovers that "Viktor" is really a woman quite early on when he overhears her confession.  He decides to play along and much of the film's comedy derives from the squeamish positions he puts her in: smoking cigars, drinking whiskey, strip clubs and a barbershop shave.

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Here's some thoughts on a couple of my listed films:

La Tete d'un Homme (1933) - French crime drama from director Julien Duvivier, based on a novel by Georges Simenon. Harry Baur stars as police Chief Inspector Maigret who's leading the investigation of the murder of a wealthy old woman stabbed in her home. The case leads to creepy, terminally-ill medical student Radek (Valery Inkijinoff) who sees this as his chance to a leave a mark on the world. Also featuring Alexandre Rignault, Gaston Jacquet, Henri Echourin, Marcel Bourdel, and Gina Manes.

I was impressed by the odd-looking Inkijinoff, even if his character doesn't always quite make sense. Director Duvivier utilizes a number of novel cinematic techniques, such as, instead of having an investigator move from location to location, he is shown addressing people on a projected screen, with the projection changing locations. It's a disconcerting way of showing location changes. This was an interesting police film, a bit ahead of its time, and any chance to see Baur is worth taking.  (7/10)

Source: FilmStruck.

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La-tete-dun-homme-1933-4.jpg

 

Dragnet Girl (1933) - Excellent Japanese crime drama/romance from Shochiku and director Yasujiro Ozu. The story follows four characters: Tokiko (Kinuyo Tanaka), a gang moll who works a legit job as a secretary at a large firm so that she can get extra cash from the company's president's son, money that she uses to keep Joji (Joji Oka), a former boxer turned minor criminal gang boss. When young hothead Hiroshi (Koji Mitsui) joins the gang, his nice-girl sister Kazuko (Sumiko Mizukubo) implores Joji to help set her brother back on the right track. Joji starts to fall for Kazuko, which causes Tokiko a lot of grief and sets her on an unpredictable path. Also featuring Yumeko Aizome, Yoshio Takayama, Koji Kaga, and Yasuo Nanjo.

This is Ozu's most technically accomplished film to date, even if he is still making them in the silent format. His camerawork and use of evocative shadowing are notable. Tanaka gives a splendid performance as a complicated character making rash decisions that only make sense coming from someone who is desperately vulnerable. Ozu continues to place American movie posters in his settings, this time featuring some from The Champ and All Quiet On the Western Front. Sharp-eyed viewers may notice Ozu regular Chishu Ryu in a small bit as a cop. Recommended.   (8/10)

Source: FilmStruck.

Dragnet%20Girl.WEB.jpg

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My review of S.O.S. Eisberg-

Leni Reifenstahl movie about an arctic expedition that goes in search of a lost expedition. Plot wise there's not much here; average mounting climbing film of the period. The copy I saw had poor visual quality but I still think the cinematography and sets were still decent from what I saw. Overall it was pretty weak though. (4/10) 

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