Bogie56

Your Favourite Foreign Language Films from 1955

560 posts in this topic

The-Great-Adventure-1953-film-images-14b

A problem most nature films from circa 1953 have is that they cannot compete with the modern day Blue Planets or other series.  That said, The Great Adventure by Arne Sucksdorff benefits from being from another culture.  There is added interest in seeing Swedish kids deal with their own habitat.  This is a film I have recommended to TCM a few times as I wanted to hear Ben Mankiewicz introduce it and keep a straight face when mentioning the director's name.  It is a multi-award winner taking a prize at Cannes and a BAFTA for Best documentary (even though it is dramatized).

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The 1954 Locarno International Film Festival foreign film winners included …

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Gate of Hell (1953) Teinosuke Kinugasa, Japan

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The 1951 German Film Awards Best Picture was …

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Don’t Forget Love (1953) Paul Verhoeven, Germany [the imdb year is probably wrong]

The 1953 German Film Awards Best Picture was …

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No Way Back (1953) Victor Vicas, Germany

 
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Italy’s Nastro d’Argento Film Journalists 1952/53 Best Picture winner was …

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Eager to Live (1953) Claudio Gora, Italy

Italy’s Nastro d’Argento Film Journalists 1953/54 Best Picture winner was …

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I Vitelloni (1953) Federico Fellini, Italy

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The Canadian Film Awards began in 1949.  A short film won the grand prize that year.  Over the years there has been a mix of English and French language films.  I will only mention the French Language Films.  In 1953 the winner was …

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T i t Coq (1953) Rene Delacroix, Gratien Gelinas, Canada

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The 1953 winner of Mexico’s Ariel Best Picture Award was ….

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The Boy and the Fog/El Nino y la Niebla (1953) Roberto Gavaldon, Mexico

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National Film Awards of India began in 1954 for films of 1953.  The Best Picture winner was …

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Shyam’s Mother (1953) Pralhad Keshav Atre, India

As far as I can tell they would next be awarded in 1959.

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The 1953 winner of the Japan Blue Ribbon Award and the Mainichi Film Award was …

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An Inlet of Muddy Water (1953) Tadashi Imai, Japan

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My top FF films of 1954 of the 10 that I have seen are ….

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1.  Seven Samurai (1954) Akira Kurosawa, Japan

2.  La Strada (1954) Federico Fellini, Italy

3.  Touchez Pau Au Grisbi (1954) Jacques Becker, France

4.  The Crucified Lovers (1954) Kenji Mizoguchi, Japan

5.  Sansho the Bailiff (1954) Kenji Mizoguchi, Japan

6.  Senso (1954) Luchino Visconti, Italy

7.  The Gold of Naples (1954) Vittorio De Sica, Italy

8.  Chronicle of Poor Lovers (1954) Carlo Lizzani, Italy

9.  Wuthering Heights (1954) Luis Bunuel, Mexico

and I’ve also seen …

A Lesson In Love (1954) Ingmar Bergman, Sweden

 

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My top foreign films of 1954-

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1.) Ernst Thalmann - Son of his Class, Kurt Maetzig, East Germany

2.) La Strada, Federico Fellini, Italy

3.) Seven Samurai, Akira Kurosawa, Japan

4.) Gojira, Ishiro Honda, Japan

5.) The Crucified Lovers,Kenji Mizoguchi, Japan

6.) Adventure in Marienstadt, Leonard Buczkowski, Poland

7.) Late Chrysanthemums, Mikio Naruse, Japan 

8.) Senso, Luchino Visconti, Italy

9.) Touchez Pau Au Grisbi, Jacques Becker, France

10.) Twenty-Four Eyes, Keisuke Kinoshita, Japan

11.) French Cancan, Jean Renoir, France

12.) Giovanna d'Arco al rogo, Roberto Rossellini, Italy

 

 

 

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1954

  1. Seven Samurai, Akira Kurosawa, Japan*
  2. Samurai 1: Musashi Miyamoto, Hiroshi Inagaki, Japan
  3. Gojira, Ishiro Honda, Japan
  4. La Strada, Federico Fellini, Italy
  5. Journey to Italy, Roberto Rossellini, Italy
  6. Sansho the Bailiff, Kenji Mizoguchi, Japan
  7. Ulysses, Mario Camerini, Italy

and I've also seen

  • The Island Monster, Roberto Bianchi Montero, Italy

 

1001 Movies You Must See

  • Journey to Italy, Roberto Rossellini, Italy
  • La Strada, Federico Fellini, Italy
  • Sansho the Bailiff, Kenji Mizoguchi, Japan
  • Senso, Luchino Visconti, Italy
  • Seven Samurai, Akira Kurosawa, Japan

 

*Seven Samurai is my favorite film of 1954, regardless of language.

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1. Seven Samurai, Akira Kurosawa, Japan

2. Sansho the Bailiff, Kenji Mizoguchi, Japan

3. French Cancan, Jean Renoir, France

4. Senso, Luchino Visconti, Italy

5. The Crucified Lovers, Kenji Mizoguchi, Japan

6. Touchez pas au Grisbi, Jacques Becker, France

7.  Fear, Roberto Rossellini, Germany

I don't consider Journey to Italy a foreign language film, since my preferred version has Sanders and Bergman speaking in English in their own voices.

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8 minutes ago, skimpole said:

I don't consider Journey to Italy a foreign language film, since my preferred version has Sanders and Bergman speaking in English in their own voices.

This is an issue Bogie and I discussed a bit via PM's. There will be a lot of Italian films coming up that will be ambiguous about whether they should be included. I have three on this year's list: Journey to ItalyUlysses, and The Island Monster. All are available in either Italian language/English subtitled versions, and in English dubbed versions, using the stars' own voices. I decided to include them because Ulysses and The Island Monster are both listed on IMDb as Italian language primarily, while in the case of Journey to Italy, the only version that I've seen is the Italian version, Viaggio in Italia.

As the Italian peblum films, historical and biblical epics, horror films, and spaghetti westerns start showing up, it will become more subjective as to what should be included or excluded.

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I didn't include Journey to Italy or Ulysses this time because I saw the English language versions.  But I will be including some films that have been shot/dubbed in both English and foreign languages.  I'm just going to endeavour to make mention when I do.  I saw the English language version of Europa 51 but I know it was released in Italian as well.  The 50's and 60's saw an upsurge in dubbed films as we know.

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In the future, to err on the side of brevity, I'll just omit any titles that seem uncertain.

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24 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

In the future, to err on the side of brevity, I'll just omit any titles that seem uncertain.

Well, here are a few I have coming up ...

The Silent World (1956) Jacques Cousteau, Louis Malle, France.   [I saw this with English narration]

Michael Strogoff/Revolt of the Tartars (1956) Carmine Gallone, France.  [I probably saw a dubbed version of this]

The Last Days of Pompeii (1959) Sergio Leone, Mario Bonnard, Italy [dubbed]

Black Sunday (1960) Mario Bava, Italy. [dubbed]

Sword of the Conqueror (1961) Carlo Campogalliani, Italy [dubbed and some leads most likely performed in English so this probably does not qualify]

But I'm mentioning Sword of the Conqueror anyway.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Bogie56 said:

I didn't include Journey to Italy or Ulysses this time because I saw the English language versions.  But I will be including some films that have been shot/dubbed in both English and foreign languages.  I'm just going to endeavour to make mention when I do.  I saw the English language version of Europa 51 but I know it was released in Italian as well.  The 50's and 60's saw an upsurge in dubbed films as we know.

I assume you have seen the English version of Godzilla too, right? :huh: 

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1 minute ago, Gershwin fan said:

I assume you have seen the English version of Godzilla too, right? :huh: 

Once, when I was a kid. The Japanese version is much better, IMO. The English version, full title Godzilla, King of the Monsters, also has additional footage (all the Raymond Burr bits), and it wasn't released until '56.

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26 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Well, here are a few I have coming up ...

Black Sunday (1960) Mario Bava, Italy. [dubbed]

I would definitely consider this a foreign language film, despite the easy access to the dubbed version. I have it on DVD and Blu-Ray, and the DVD is Italian language only. The Italian version is also longer, and has a different title (The Mask of Satan). I also consider it a milestone in European horror.

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11 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

1001 Movies You Must See

  • Journey to Italy, Roberto Rossellini, Italy
  • La Strada, Federico Fellini, Italy
  • Sansho the Bailiff, Kenji Mizoguchi, Japan
  • Senso, Luchino Visconti, Italy
  • Seven Samurai, Akira Kurosawa, Japan

From the foreign editions-

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1.) Magiki Polis, Nikos Koundouros, Greek edition

2.) Sininen Viikko,  Matti Kassila, Finnish edition

 

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4 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Once, when I was a kid. The Japanese version is much better, IMO. The English version, full title Godzilla, King of the Monsters, also has additional footage (all the Raymond Burr bits), and it wasn't released until '56.

Yeah, I've seen the original Japanese version too. I was just asking because I thought Bogie's exclusion of it odd. I'd expect him to have seen it before.

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1 minute ago, Gershwin fan said:

Yeah, I've seen the original Japanese version too. I was just asking because I thought Bogie's exclusion of it odd. I'd expect him to have seen it before.

Sorry, I was doing two things at once and thought that previous comment was directed at me. 

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Just now, LawrenceA said:

Sorry, I was doing two things at once and thought that previous comment was directed at me. 

It's fine.

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Also btw I just added French Cancan  to my list if you noticed. I don't keep all the movies I've seen written down so sometimes I'll initially forget I had seen a movie when I'm making my list and I'll go back and correct it. I saw it on TCM Imports a few months ago and was not impressed. :unsure: 

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46 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

Yeah, I've seen the original Japanese version too. I was just asking because I thought Bogie's exclusion of it odd. I'd expect him to have seen it before.

I've only seen the 56 version but have recorded the 54 version courtesy of TCM.

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