Bogie56

Your Favourite Foreign Language Films from 1975

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The 1975 Belgium Film Critics Association Best Picture Award went to …

 

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Aguirre the Wrath of God (1972) Werner Herzog, Germany

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I saw Wim Wenders' The Goalie's Anxiety at the Penalty Kick at the first Toronto Film Festival.  It was part of a spotlight on new wave German films that included directors Wenders, Fassbinder, Herzog and others.  I was bowled over by it.   The film begins with a soccer match and the goalie, Arthur Brauss is sent off for attacking the referee.  He is suspended for several games so he takes to the road to fill the time.  Based on novel by Peter Handke, this existential film is not unlike Camus' The Outsider.  Early on, Brauss strangles a girl for no apparent reason.  In this case he doesn't even have the extreme heat of the sun to blame.  He gives it about as much thought as reading the newspaper.  And you don't get the impression he is a danger to commit the act again.  Perhaps it was just curiosity or boredom.

It is a strange road picture. Inconsequential things like a close up of an apple hanging in a tree are given equal weight to a shot of a stream that might contain the body of a murdered child.

I wondered if it was my college age sensibilities that attracted me to this film and Wenders' other road pictures.  Perhaps it may have lost its lustre with age?  I can certainly see it might not be to all tastes.  I saw it again a few weeks ago and still enjoyed it.

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1972 saw the beginning of two landmark series in Japanese cinema, the Lone Wolf and Cub series and the Hanzo the Razor series. The former was based on a manga ( or comic book) from Kazuo Koike and Goseki Kojima, while the latter was based on a gekiga (a more adult-oriented form of comic book) by Kazuo Koike, also. 

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The Lone Wolf and Cub films were released by Toho, and star Tomisaburo Wakayama as Ogami Itto, the reigning shogun's chief executioner. He falls victim to court intrigue and finds himself a fugitive with a price on his head. He roams the country with his 3-year-old son Daigoro, who usually stays in a baby cart, or stroller, with various deadly accessories. Ogami Itto invariably runs into people who want to capture or kill him, forcing him into combat, in which he has no equal. 

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Hanzo the Razor, from the Daiei studio, follows the exploits of the title character, a shogun-era policeman with a feared reputation thanks to his battle prowess and physical peculiarities, played by Shintaro Katsu.

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Both initial films were directed by Kenji Misumi, and the stars of both series were brothers in real life. Wakayama plays Itto with a permanent glowering expression, saying little but slaying many in over-the-top fashion, despite his corpulent appearance. Katsu, who had become a major star in the 1960's thanks to his role in the popular Zatoichi films, totally destroys his nice-guy image from those films, as Hanzo is rude, crude, and not above using, shall we say, unusual tactics in his interrogations.

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Both series are exaggerated genre affairs, and while the Lone Wolf films (6 in all) are much better than the Hanzo films (3 in all), they're both worth checking out for fans of samurai fiction and outrageous world cinema.

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Roma. Federico Fellini.

Fellini's Roma is not among my favorite Fellini movies, but it does have one smashing scene:

 

 

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Mecánica Nacional. Luis Alcoriza. With Manolo Fábregas, Lucha Villa, Héctor Suárez. Comedy, drama.

A car race attracts a large crowd, revealing their marital problems, jealousy, and tragedy. The movie is sexist, colorful, and a bit dated, but not much. Funny and entertaining, with good performances all around. How they take Sara García back home is funny and depressing at the same time, and it's happened to several people I know!

Unfortunately there doesn't seem to be a good copy around; the one I bought on Amazon looks like ripped from an old VHS.

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I don't mean to gum up the works here, but I just saw this on another site and felt it may be of some interest to the thread participants:

The BBC’s 100 Greatest Foreign Language Films

Every year in the later Summer or Fall, a major British magazine or outlet publishes one of those greatest of all time lists that stir some big debate about movies.

In 2016 The BBC did their 100 Greatest Films of the 21st Century poll with 177 film critics from around the world weighing in on the list which had David Lynch’s “Mulholland Drive” at Number One. They followed that up with last year’s 100 Greatest Comedies list which enlisted 253 film critics from around the world who ultimately deemed Billy Wilder’s “Some Like It Hot” as the best comedy ever made.

This year they polled 209 critics (45% of which were women) representing 43 countries for their newest list – the 100 Greatest Foreign-Language Films of all time. None of these films are made in English and they run the gamut from the 1920s to this decade, with Akira Kurosawa’s topping the vote as the greatest non-English language film ever made.

Several directors popped up numerous times in the list with Wong Kar-wai, Abbas Kiarostami and Jean-Luc Godard making it three times; Akira Kurosawa, Andrei Tarkovsky and Federico Fellini had four films in there each; and both Ingmar Bergman and Luis Bunuel had the most mentions with five each. Here’s a look at the list in full:

1. “Seven Samurai” (Akira Kurosawa, 1954)
2. “Bicycle Thieves” (Vittorio de Sica, 1948)
3. “Tokyo Story” (Yasujiro Ozu, 1953)
4. “Rashomon” (Akira Kurosawa, 1950)
5. “The Rules of the Game” (Jean Renoir, 1939)
6. “Persona” (Ingmar Bergman, 1966)
7. “8 1/2” (Federico Fellini, 1963)
8. “The 400 Blows” (Francois Truffaut, 1959)
9. “In the Mood for Love” (Wong Kar-wai, 2000)
10. “La Dolce Vita” (Federico Fellini, 1960)
11. “Breathless” (Jean-Luc Godard, 1960)
12. “Farewell My Concubine” (Chen Kaige, 1993)
13. “M” (Fritz Lang, 1931)
14. “Jeanne Dielman, 23 Commerce…” (Chantal Akerman, 1975)
15. “Pather Panchali” (Satyajit Ray, 1955)
16. “Metropolis” (Fritz Lang, 1927)
17. “Aguirre, the Wrath of God” (Werner Herzog, 1972)
18. “A City of Sadness” (Hou Hsiao-hsien, 1989)
19. “The Battle of Algiers” (Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966)
20. “The Mirror” (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1974)
21. “A Separation” (Asghar Farhadi, 2011)
22. “Pan’s Labyrinth” (Guillermo del Toro, 2006)
23. “The Passion of Joan of Arc” (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1928)
24. “Battleship Potemkin” (Sergei M Eisenstein, 1925)
25. “Yi Yi” (Edward Yang, 2000)
26. “Cinema Paradiso” (Giuseppe Tornatore, 1988)
27. “The Spirit of the Beehive” (Victor Erice, 1973)
28. “Fanny and Alexander” (Ingmar Bergman, 1982)
29. “Oldboy” (Park Chan-wook, 2003)
30. “The Seventh Seal” (Ingmar Bergman, 1957)
31. “The Lives of Others” (Florian H. von Donnersmarck, 2006)
32. “All About My Mother” (Pedro Almodovar, 1999)
33. “Playtime” (Jacques Tati, 1967)
34. “Wings of Desire” (Wim Wenders, 1987)
35. “The Leopard” (Luchino Visconti, 1963)
36. “La Grande Illusion” (Jean Renoir, 1937)
37. “Spirited Away” (Hayao Miyazaki, 2001)
38. “A Brighter Summer Day” (Edward Yang, 1991)
39. ” Close-Up” (Abbas Kiarostami, 1990)
40. “Andrei Rublev” (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1966)
41. “To Live” (Zhang Yimou, 1994)
42. “City of God” (Fernando Meirelles, Kátia Lund, 2002)
43. “Beau Travail” (Claire Denis, 1999)
44. “Cleo from 5 to 7” (Agnès Varda, 1962)
45. “L’Avventura” (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1960)
46. “Children of Paradise” (Marcel Carné, 1945)
47. “4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days” (Cristian Mungiu, 2007)
48. “Viridiana” (Luis Bunuel, 1961)
49. “Stalker” (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1979)
50. “L’Atalante” (Jean Vigo, 1934)
51. “The Umbrellas of Cherbourg” (Jacques Demy, 1964)
52. “Au Hasard Balthazar” (Robert Bresson, 1966)
53. “Late Spring” (Yasujiro Ozu, 1949)
54. “Eat Drink Man Woman” (Ang Lee, 1994)
55. “Jules and Jim” (Francois Truffaut, 1962)
56. “Chungking Express” (Wong Kar-wai, 1994)
57. “Solaris” (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1972)
58. “The Earrings of Madame de…” (Max Ophüls, 1953)
59. “Come and See” (Elem Klimov, 1985)
60. “Contempt” (Jean-Luc Godard, 1963)
61. “Sansho the Bailiff” (Kenji Mizoguchi, 1954)
62. “Touki Bouki” (Djibril Diop Mambéty, 1973)
63. “Spring in a Small Town” (Fei Mu, 1948)
64. “Three Colours: Blue” (Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1993)
65. “Ordet” (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1955)
66. “Ali: Fear Eats the Soul” (Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1973)
67. “The Exterminating Angel” (Luis Bunuel, 1962)
68. “Ugetsu” (Kenji Mizoguchi, 1953)
69. “Amour” (Michael Haneke, 2012)
70. “L’Eclisse” (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1962)
71. “Happy Together” (Wong Kar-wai, 1997)
72. “Ikiru” (Akira Kurosawa, 1952)
73. “Man with a Movie Camera” (Dziga Vertov, 1929)
74. “Pierrot Le Fou” (Jean-Luc Godard, 1965)
75. “Belle de Jour” (Luis Bunuel, 1967)
76. “Y Tu Mamá También” (Alfonso Cuaron, 2001)
77. “The Conformist” (Bernardo Bertolucci, 1970)
78. “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” (Ang Lee, 2000)
79. “Ran” (Akira Kurosawa, 1985)
80. “The Young and the Damned” (Luis Bunuel, 1950)
81. “Celine and Julie go Boating” (Jacques Rivette, 1974)
82. “Amélie” (Jean-Pierre Jeunet, 2001)
83. “La Strada” (Federico Fellini, 1954)
84. “The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie” (Luis Bunuel, 1972)
85. “Umberto D” (Vittorio de Sica, 1952)
86. “La Jetée” (Chris Marker, 1962)
87. “The Nights of Cabiria” (Federico Fellini, 1957)
88. “The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum” (Kenji Mizoguchi, 1939)
89. “Wild Strawberries” (Ingmar Bergman, 1957)
90. “Hiroshima Mon Amour” (Alain Resnais, 1959)
91. “Rififi” (Jules Dassin, 1955)
92. “Scenes from a Marriage” (Ingmar Bergman, 1973)
93. “Raise the Red Lantern” (Zhang Yimou, 1991)
94. “Where Is the Friend’s Home?” (Abbas Kiarostami, 1987)
95. “Floating Clouds” (Mikio Naruse, 1955)
96. “Shoah” (Claude Lanzmann, 1985)
97. “Taste of Cherry” (Abbas Kiarostami, 1997)
98. “In the Heat of the Sun” (Jiang Wen, 1994)
99. “Ashes and Diamonds” (Andrzej Wajda, 1958)
100. “Landscape in the Mist” (Theo Angelopoulos, 1988)

http://www.darkhorizons.com/the-bbcs-100-greatest-foreign-language-films/

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18 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The BBC’s 100 Greatest Foreign Language Films

 

Well there you go, my best foreign language film of all time didn't even make their top 100 list. :D  Stay tuned for the end of this thread when we do that poll.

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The 1972 Argentinian Film Critics Association Best Picture Award went to …

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The Mafia (1972) Leopoldo Torre Nilsson, Argentina

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The 1972 Danish Bodil Award for Best European Picture went to …

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The New Land (1972) Jan Troell, Sweden

 

The 1973 Danish Bodil Award for Best European Picture went to …

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Cries and Whispers (1972) Ingmar Bergman, Sweden

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Italy’s Nastro d’Argento Film Journalists 1972/73 Best ‘Foreign’ Picture winner …

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Cries and Whispers (1972) Ingmar Bergman, Sweden

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The 1972 winner of the Mainichi Film Award was …

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The Long Darkness (1972) Kei Kumai, Japan

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Kinji Fukasaku known for his wild Yakuza films of the 60's and 70's and Battle Royale (2000) made a pretty gruesome WWII film, Under the Flag of the Rising Sun (1972) that made my top ten.  In a familiar structure a war widow seeks out four comrades of her late husband to determine the truth about his death.

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Chloe in the Afternoon, already mentioned, beautifully closed out Eric Rohmer's Six Moral Tales.  I have it on DVD, and hope to re-watch it soon. 

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10 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Well there you go, my best foreign language film of all time didn't even make their top 10 list. :D  Stay tuned for the end of this thread when we do that poll.

Mine didn't even make the top 100! :lol: Good list though. Lots of famous, must see films. 

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11 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Well there you go, my best foreign language film of all time didn't even make their top 10 list. :D  Stay tuned for the end of this thread when we do that poll.

 

8 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

Mine didn't even make the top 100! :lol: Good list though. Lots of famous, must see films. 

I was surprised to see that there are so few that I haven't seen:

  1. A City of Sadness (1989)
  2. The Mirror (1975)
  3. A Brighter Summer Day (1991)
  4. To Live (1994)
  5. Chungking Express (1994)
  6. Touki Bouki (1973)
  7. Three Colors: Blue (1993)
  8. Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (1973)
  9. Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974)
  10. Where Is the Friend's Home? (1987)
  11. Floating Clouds (1955)
  12. Shoah (1985)
  13. Taste of Cherry (1997)
  14. In the Heat of the Sun (1994)
  15. Landscape in the Mist (1988)

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4 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

Mine didn't even make the top 100! :lol: Good list though. Lots of famous, must see films. 

A typo on my part.  I also meant the top 100.

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5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

 

I was surprised to see that there are so few that I haven't seen:

  1. A City of Sadness (1989)
  2. The Mirror (1975)
  3. A Brighter Summer Day (1991)
  4. To Live (1994)
  5. Chungking Express (1994)
  6. Touki Bouki (1973)
  7. Three Colors: Blue (1993)
  8. Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (1973)
  9. Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974)
  10. Where Is the Friend's Home? (1987)
  11. Floating Clouds (1955)
  12. Shoah (1985)
  13. Taste of Cherry (1997)
  14. In the Heat of the Sun (1994)
  15. Landscape in the Mist (1988)

The only ones I haven't seen are 

1.) A City of Sadness

2.) A Separation

3.) To Live

4.) 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days

5.) Eat Drink Man Woman

6.) In the Heat of the Sun

7.) Landscape in the Mist.

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The Flower Girl - This movie is based on an opera supposedly written by Kim Il Sung.  Koppun sells flowers at the market to help support her family. Her mother is seriously ill and her sister was blinded by the landlord Mrs. Pae after she hit the girl for spilling food. To make matters worse, her brother is taken away to a slave labor camp where she believes he dies. Koppun is despondent and takes revenge on the landlord with the help of the other townspeople and then her brother miraculously arrives with the guerillas to save her. This film portrays the kind of racism the Koreans experienced from the occupying Japanese. The Japanese soldiers and civilians spit on Koppun and the Koreans and call them backwards leaving them despondent. In one scene, the blind girl and her sister attempt to get food but the butcher says it is reserved for the priest and the Japanese soldiers. The Japanese are portrayed as the occupiers who help the Feudalist lords to enslave the populace. This film won a "Prix Special" at the 1972 Karlovy Vary International Film Festival. This film is genuinely very sad and will pull at your heart. The music is very pretty too. This is one of the few films from the North to be widely distributed outside of the country as it was played throughout East Asia in the 1970s in countries like China and Malaysia. Overall the propaganda is very blatant here but it is a well crafted film that knows how to play on your emotions. I give it a 6/10.

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22 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

The only ones I haven't seen are 

1.) A City of Sadness

2.) A Separation

3.) To Live

4.) 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days

5.) Eat Drink Man Woman

6.) In the Heat of the Sun

7.) Landscape in the Mist.

6 is the only one I haven't seen.

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Just now, skimpole said:

6 is the only one I haven't seen.

Not only have I not seen it, it's also the only one on the list that I hadn't heard of before.

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1 hour ago, Gershwin fan said:

4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days

I liked that movie very much and I think it's a great movie. If you ever have the change to watch it, please do. Highly recommended.

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8 minutes ago, Arsan404 said:

I liked that movie very much and I think it's a great movie. If you ever have the change to watch it, please do. Highly recommended.

I hadn't heard of it before but it looks interesting. Thanks for the recommendation! 

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According to wikipedia the 1973 Chicago International Film Festival’s Best Picture Award went to this foreign language film …

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Morgiana (1972) Juraj Herz, Czechoslovakia

 

According to the imdb the 1973 Chicago International Film Festival’s Best Picture Award went to this foreign language film …

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Mirage (1972) Armando Robles Godoy, Peru

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Winners of the 1973 Moscow International Film Festival included ….

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Affection (1973) Ludmil Staikov, Bulgaria

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Giancarlo Giannini is Mimi in Lina Wertmuller's The Seduction of Mimi (1972).  I believe this is the first in a series of Giannini's loveable scoundrels in Wertmuller's films.  Mimi is a construction worker who runs afoul with the local mafia when it is discovered that he didn't vote for their candidate but instead went with the Communist Party.  

Mariangela Melato ...

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and Elena Fiori are especially good in support ...

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