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Your Favourite Foreign Language Films from 1975

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14 hours ago, CoraSmith said:

La Grande Bouffe is a French-Italian co-production with big names like Marcello Mastroianni, Michel Piccoli and Philippe Noiret. A group of people decide to organize an **** (or-gy) and try to eat themselves to death. To be avoided if you’re on a diet.

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This movie was very restricted when it opened, somehow the equivalent of NC-17, but I the ticket seller and the doorman let me in anyway. I got lucky most of the time.

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14 hours ago, CoraSmith said:

The Mad Adventures of Rabbi Jacob (Les Aventures de Rabbi Jacob) is a French comedy with Louis de Funès. He plays a rich man who makes antisemitic remarks. Later, on the run for a bunch of radicals, he has to disguise himself as a rabbi. The adventure makes him change his ideas and become more tolerant. It includes a famous dancing scene.

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This is a very funny movie. My friends and I saw it 3 or 4 times when it opened, and I would like to see it again.

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On 11/3/2018 at 12:37 AM, LawrenceA said:

The Mansion of Madness, Juan Lopez Moctezuma, Mexico

I'm glad somebody else remember this movie, one of my favorites.

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5 minutes ago, Arsan404 said:

I'm glad somebody else remember this movie, one of my favorites.

The version I saw, under the title Dr. Tarr's Torture Dungeon, was very poor quality. I'd like to see it cleaned up, which I believe the Mondo Macabro DVD release is. I'll maybe have more from director Moctezuma on a later list.

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3 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The version I saw, under the title Dr. Tarr's Torture Dungeon, was very poor quality. I'd like to see it cleaned up, which I believe the Mondo Macabro DVD release is. I'll have more from director Moctezuma on a later list.

I hope you find a copy of higher quality, because the images are splendid. There's a high-quality print available on YouTube, but it's in Spanish with no subtitles.

"I'll have more from director Moctezuma on a later list." Alucarda?

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On 11/2/2018 at 12:18 AM, Gershwin fan said:

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Cut Throats Nine - This is an extremely violent western from Spain. An officer is leading a group of criminals in covered wagons across the mountains when they are attacked by bandits. Unknown to the prisoners, their chains are made of gold (for some reason unexplained???) The officer, his daughter and a few of the criminals survive and he tries to lead them to their destination. One of the criminals killed his wife and he isn't sure which one it is. The film deals with the main characters as they torment each other while stuck in the desolate mountains during a blizzard. This film is very graphic and is said to be a partial inspiration for Tarantino's Hateful Eight. Not the best film but okay as far as violent, exploitation cinema goes. If you don't have a weak stomach I recommend giving it a shot. IMDB says this is getting a remake but it has been listed as "in development" for years so I don't think it will be made unfortunately. 

I can't remember if I've seen this movie, which means probably I haven't. Thanks for the review.

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14 minutes ago, Arsan404 said:

"I'll have more from director Moctezuma on a later list." Alucarda?

That was the one I was thinking of, but I looked it up on IMDb, and it only lists English as the movie's spoken language, so I guess I won't be listing it after all. :( 

But I do like it a lot, and recommend it to fans of outer-fringe horror.

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23 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

That was the one I was thinking of, but I looked it up on IMDb, and it only lists English as the movie's spoken language, so I guess I won't be listing it after all. :( 

But I do like it a lot, and recommend it to fans of outer-fringe horror.

I've also seen that one. This is what Wikipedia says on it.

>Though it is a Mexican Spanish language film, it was originally filmed in English, as evidenced by the fact that the lip movements match the dubbed English dialogue

"It's a Spanish language film that was filmed in English language." :huh: 

???? I have no idea what they mean. If it was filmed in English they should just say it's English language. 

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Michael Gebert’s Golden Armchair Award for the 1973 foreign film was …

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The Mother and the **** (1973) Jean Eustache, France

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The 1973 Argentinian Film Critics Association Best Picture Award went to …

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Juan Moreira (1973) Leonardo Favio, Argentina.  The next awards would be in 1980.

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The 1972/73 Danish Bodil Award for Best Picture went to …

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The Escape (1973) Hans Kristensen, Denmark

 

The 1974 Danish Bodil Award for Best Picture went to …

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Lars Ole, 5c (1973) Nils Malmros, Denmark

 

The 1974 Danish Bodil Award for Best European Picture went to …

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Amarcord (1973) Federico Fellini, Italy

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Italy’s Nastro d’Argento Film Journalists 1972/73 Best Picture winner …

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Amarcord (1973) Federico Fellini, Italy

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The 1973 winner of the Mainichi Film Award was …

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Jongara (1973) Koichi Saito, Japan

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The Seventh Bullet - This Soviet western was filmed entirely in the Uzbek republic and stars only Uzbek actors. The dialogue is primarily in Russian but there is some Uzbek and Arabic dialogue too. In the days during the Russian Civil War, Maksumov is a Red Army commander whose troops betray him and leave for a Basmachi lord, Khairulla (who is also financed by the British who were financing fundamentalist rebels in Central Asia at the time) while he was away in Tashkent. The title comes from Maksumov's oath to kill Khairulla with his seventh bullet that he keeps tucked in the band of his hat. Maksumov tries to track him down and convince his troops to return to him. Also the woman Aigul is infatuated with him and follows him along the way. This film has a lot of shoot outs and cool action scenes. Maksumov is freed from prison in an action scene with lots of shooting and stunts. One major theme of this film is that of the backwards Muslims vs. the progressive, forward thinking Soviets (portrayed through the character Maksumov). When asked to make a deal with the Basmachi lord he responds "You would not betray your religion so do not ask me to betray mine." In another scene, maksumov tries to remind his men why they were fighting Khairulla in the first place because he tortured and killed many of their family members and performed barbaric acts like honor killings. The cinematography of this film was very good and reminded me of the shots of Monument Valley in John Ford films. The soundtrack was also very nice and the actress who played Aigul was very pretty. This is a very well shot film and I recommend it to anyone interested in Red Westerns. Not as great as White Sun of the Desert but it is a very good film in its own right. This film is probably one of my favorite Central Asian films of the few that I have seen. I give it a 7/10.

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22 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

it only lists English as the movie's spoken language

 

22 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

it was originally filmed in English

Juan López Moctezuma shot La Mansión de la Locura and Alucarda (Mary, Mary, Bloody Mary too) in English, but I saw both movies in movie theaters in Spanish. Mexican Spanish, that is, because those movies were also dubbed into Peninsular Spanish. Tina Romero sounds a lot sexier in Mexican Spanish, trust me.

I doubt that López Moctezuma was willing to lose the Mexican and Latin American market, so he either shot the movies in both languages or dubbed them into Spanish in post-production. Either way, I think they both qualify as Foreign Language films.

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The Winner of the 1973 Berlin International Film Festival was this foreign language film …

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Distant Thunder (1973) Satyajit Ray, India

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Distant Thunder (1973) is one of my favourite Satyajit Ray films and was number three on my list for this year.  It follows a young village doctor and his wife as they struggle to help during the great famine of 1943.

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The 1973 Locarno International Film Festival foreign film winner was …

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Illumination (1973) Krzystof Zanussi, Poland

 

The 1974 Locarno International Film Festival foreign film winner was …

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25 Fireman’s Street (1974) Istvan Szabo, Hungary

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This foreign language film won the 1973 San Sebastian Film Festival …

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The Spirit of the Beehive (1973) Victor Erice, Spain

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Claude Feraldo's Themroc (1973) was an audience favourite at the first Toronto Film Festival.   Michel Piccoli stars as a worker who goes mad and decides to live life as a caveman.  He barricades the door to his apartment and makes a hole in the wall then uses a ladder to come and go.  I recall that it was very non-PC (Piccoli abducts women to his cave) so I wonder how it would be viewed today.  

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I also saw Wim Wenders' The Scarlet Letter (1973) at the Toronto Film Festival but found it a bit dull.  Senta Berger was quite beautiful in it though.

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The Holy Mountain - Another great film from Jodorowsky. He plays an enlightened monk who takes 9 corrupt, greedy, materialist people on a search for enlightenment. Like many of his films, this one has a lot of odd imagery and just bizarre content. The film even ends by breaking the fourth wall, showing the futility of it all! A good film for those interested in bizarre 70s cult films. Note: there is a lot of nudity and violence in this one.

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Touki Bouki - A couple want to get to Paris so they steal the money from a local tribe that was going to use the money to build a statue of DeGaulle. This movie is pretty funny and I liked it more than Black Girl. The two go separate ways but plan to meet up on the ship. Of course things do not go their way. I recommend this one. 

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A Slightly Pregnant Man - Comedic farce starring Mastroianni. His character experiences stomach pains and the doctor explains that he is the first pregnant male that resulted from man's modern lifestyle. Meh, this one wasn't particularly funny and the soundtrack was really grating. Demy is not one of my favorite directors. I don't like many of his films. 

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The Nederlands Film Festival began in 1981.  In 1999 they awarded this film the Best Dutch film of the century …

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Turkish Delight (1973) Paul Verhoeven, The Netherlands

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