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LawrenceA

Call Me by Your Name

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So it looks like Call Me by Your Name is going to be a major contender this awards season, already racking up a few best-of-the-year accolades and a few Best Actor wins for Timothee Chalamet.

Has anyone here seen it? Does it deserve the awards love it's getting? Any comments about the film or the current political climate and how that shapes the film's reception, either positively or negatively? 

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I have not seen it yet- and have mixed feelings when a film is over hyped it sometimes fails to live up to our expectations- but yes it does look like the gay darling of award season.

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9 hours ago, jaragon said:

I have not seen it yet- and have mixed feelings when a film is over hyped it sometimes fails to live up to our expectations- but yes it does look like the gay darling of award season.

It's hard to tell from all the press whether or not it's the "gay darling" aspect which is driving the interest. I have to admit I have hopes that after the vacuum left in the wake of Brokeback Mountain we might finally have another gay-themed film with broad popular appeal. But the public is so fickle about what it will and won't accept. Also, the age discrepancy thing is coming at the exact wrong time. 

My main concern is that the story in the book is told from a singular (and kind of brooding) point of view, that of the "boy". So much of it is stream-of-consciousness that the actual narrative is pretty bare bones. But, from the sound of it, there's a strong narrative in place for the film version, as well as fully-realized characters. (The father gets a lot of mention.) From all I've heard, I'm expecting excellence, but I think you're right to wonder if there might not be some kind of wish-fulfilment fantasy at work in terms of the film's reputation.

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The novel was adapted by James Ivory who did the same for "Maurice" (1987) - the studio is giving a very slow prestige release they are obviously hoping the film is prime Oscar bait.

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Call Me by Your Name is a moving, intelligent gay coming of age Jewish love story. I don't know the book, but James Ivory was a good choice to write the screenplay, which in some ways combines elements of Maurice and A Room with a View. There are so many homages to antiquity and the Greeks in this movie, that I fully expected to see a copy of Plato's Symposium lying around. 

Timothée Chalamet is amazing as the 17-year old Elio; Armie Hammer is excellent as Oliver, though he is the more shadowy character, serving mainly to enable Elio's development. (Hammer is particularly good at displaying the vulnerability which can exist beneath the facade of the self assured.)

The first love scene between Elio and Oliver, in the bedroom, is beautifully, realistically done, beginning with awkwardness, then moving to passion. The film's final shot -- Elio gazing into the fireplace, with the snow falling outside, as the Chanukah table is being set -- is a beautiful ending to a sensitive movie. Elio is called to dinner -- he turns from the fireplace to the dinner table, and toward his future.

armie-hammer-timothee-chalamet-call-me-b

Here is a perceptive review:

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/12/04/call-me-by-your-name-an-erotic-triumph

 

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On ‎12‎/‎26‎/‎2017 at 9:32 PM, Swithin said:

Call Me by Your Name is a moving, intelligent gay coming of age Jewish love story. I don't know the book, but James Ivory was a good choice to write the screenplay, which in some ways combines elements of Maurice and A Room with a View. There are so many homages to antiquity and the Greeks in this movie, that I fully expected to see a copy of Plato's Symposium lying around. 

Timothée Chalamet is amazing as the 17-year old Elio; Armie Hammer is excellent as Oliver, though he is the more shadowy character, serving mainly to enable Elio's development. (Hammer is particularly good at displaying the vulnerability which can exist beneath the facade of the self assured.)

The first love scene between Elio and Oliver, in the bedroom, is beautifully, realistically done, beginning with awkwardness, then moving to passion. The film's final shot -- Elio gazing into the fireplace, with the snow falling outside, as the Chanukah table is being set -- is a beautiful ending to a sensitive movie. Elio is called to dinner -- he turns from the fireplace to the dinner table, and toward his future.

armie-hammer-timothee-chalamet-call-me-b

Here is a perceptive review:

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/12/04/call-me-by-your-name-an-erotic-triumph

 

Both your own review and the New Yorker's make me want to see this more than ever. Consensual joy indeed.  Thanks.

 

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Did the studio releasing this movie made a mistake in the way it was marketed?  Some straight people seemed to have a real problem with the subject matter- so I guess there is no way around it.  In the current newspapers add the  boy is feature alone - looking longingly to an off screen image.

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11 hours ago, jaragon said:

Did the studio releasing this movie made a mistake in the way it was marketed?  Some straight people seemed to have a real problem with the subject matter- so I guess there is no way around it.  In the current newspapers add the  boy is feature alone - looking longingly to an off screen image.

Timothee Chalamet is the one with the Oscar nomination so I guess it makes sense to feature him in the advertising, but you're right to wonder if it's a mistake. It will get all those people who're led to believe it's simply a "coming of age" story into the theaters, people who might not have gone if they had realized it's a gay love story. We're movie freaks here and keep up, but for a lot of people movies (and politics) are something more remote which they get information about in snippets here and there and from ads on the entertainment page of their local paper. The ad you mentioned is a calculation made for financial reasons and it's a compromise. I'm sure for media outlets which are perceived as being the most gay-friendly the advertising is more specific. Naturally I'd like to see the movie succeed financially, but it's eye-opening that a gay-themed movie still can't be allowed to do it entirely on its own terms. 

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On social media AMC is using the film to advertising- and it was on Facebook were an outrage man commented that AMC was promoting "pedophilia" which of course is not what the movie is about.  By the way pedophilia seems to be the most over used and misunderstood term that people have been using ever since the Kevin Spacey scandal which like I suspected did have an effect on this films commercial success.  On the poster people see a young man- who looks a lot younger than 17 with an older man who looks a lot older than 26- and what idea do they think comes to mind? But in the actual movie the age difference is not as obvious I agree with you Dougie B- the studio is trying to cash in on the Oscar nominations for Chamalet. I will try to see the movie today and see what the audience is like.

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I saw the movie and everyone needs to go out and buy a ticket now!  Yes I liked it a lot- I had a few minor problems but over all its a beautiful, romantic gay love story- and I always get a thrill about seeing gay love on the BIG SCREEN were is belongs.  Chalamet deserves his Oscar nomination but Hammer who is some ways has a more difficult role should have been nominated too.  And yes everyone will feel like buying peaches after the movie

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It's my understanding the age difference between the two characters is not that much.  It's not like some old **** trying to seduce a 12 year old boy.  I would hope viewers would understand this and that it is a romantic gay love story.  If they can't handle the subject matter, then maybe they shouldn't watch the movie.  Then again, maybe they should see it and learn that love is love; it's universal.

I haven't seen it yet but from what I've read Hammer (and the guy playing the dad) deserved Oscar noms.  Perhaps those noms went to the two cops from THREE BILLBOARDS...?

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I saw the movie again today and loved it even more- my husband thought Hammer seemed to old for the part - but i think he does a fine job.  Everyone who worked on this movie deserved an Oscar nomination- I will probably see in a theater one more time yes there is nothing more thrilling than gay love on the big screen

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3 hours ago, ChristineHoard said:

It's my understanding the age difference between the two characters is not that much.  It's not like some old **** trying to seduce a 12 year old boy.  I would hope viewers would understand this and that it is a romantic gay love story.  If they can't handle the subject matter, then maybe they shouldn't watch the movie.  Then again, maybe they should see it and learn that love is love; it's universal.

I haven't seen it yet but from what I've read Hammer (and the guy playing the dad) deserved Oscar noms.  Perhaps those noms went to the two cops from THREE BILLBOARDS...?

People who are so narrow minded not to go see this movie are loosing the chance to see a very special film.  Chamolet sometimes looks like kid other times he seems more mature and gives an extraordinary performance. At one point he states that he is not child he is seventeen- would people be that upset if the lovers were straight I don't think so- go see it - this is big screen experience just for the Italian scenery

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11 hours ago, jaragon said:

People who are so narrow minded not to go see this movie are loosing the chance to see a very special film.  Chamolet sometimes looks like kid other times he seems more mature and gives an extraordinary performance. At one point he states that he is not child he is seventeen- would people be that upset if the lovers were straight I don't think so- go see it - this is big screen experience just for the Italian scenery

Judging by the trailer it looks gorgeous. Plus the fact that James Ivory wrote the script should put this in the class of must-see movies. I really hope it doesn't fall victim to the current political climate where prejudice has such license. In the book (and I assume in the movie) the boy's parents get it; let's hope the public can get it.

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9 hours ago, DougieB said:

Judging by the trailer it looks gorgeous. Plus the fact that James Ivory wrote the script should put this in the class of must-see movies. I really hope it doesn't fall victim to the current political climate where prejudice has such license. In the book (and I assume in the movie) the boy's parents get it; let's hope the public can get it.

Yes, the father's sensitive understanding of what had happened between Elio and Oliver was - in a word - extraordinary.

Sometimes, an atypical relationship - one that doesn't look right on the surface - can be rewarding and life-affirming.    

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10 hours ago, DougieB said:

Judging by the trailer it looks gorgeous. Plus the fact that James Ivory wrote the script should put this in the class of must-see movies. I really hope it doesn't fall victim to the current political climate where prejudice has such license. In the book (and I assume in the movie) the boy's parents get it; let's hope the public can get it.

Both times that I saw the movie the theater was full and the audience was positive- I think some people are reluctant to see it because of the subject matter they are missing a wonderful film experience- which I think a bit different from the book- I will probably go again- like I did with "Brokeback Mountain" people complain they don't make intelligent classy films and then they don't go to see one when it comes out.  

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1 hour ago, jaragon said:

Both times that I saw the movie the theater was full and the audience was positive- I think some people are reluctant to see it because of the subject matter they are missing a wonderful film experience- which I think a bit different from the book- I will probably go again- like I did with "Brokeback Mountain" people complain they don't make intelligent classy films and then they don't go to see one when it comes out.  

Worldwide, "Brokeback Mountain" made $178,062,759 at the box office.

It is the eighth highest-grossing romantic drama of all time.

2AEA1B8800000578-3177751-Ground_breaking

 

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, rayban said:

Worldwide, "Brokeback Mountain" made 178,062,759 at the box office.

It is the eighth highest-grossing romantic drama of all time.

2AEA1B8800000578-3177751-Ground_breaking

 

 

 

 

Jake and Heath a movie couple for the ages...talk about magical chemistry.  I think the problem with "Call Me By Your Name" is that feels more like a foreign film- if the entire movie was in French or Italian it would win Best Picture.  "Brokeback Moutain" had a more universal appeal that made it go beyond the gay movie ghetto. Not just the two big stars, but the setting it's a very American movie, and the theme of that special secret romance is something that everyone straight or gay can identify with.  The other important element are the women in the film. In the short story they are barely mentioned but the in  film the women both their wives and Enis daughter are very crucial to the story.

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Finally saw it. I wasn't expecting the movie to be so frankly erotic; it's true to the book in that way. But I can see how it might be a problem for people who are already iffy about homosexuality. Lets face it: in Brokeback Mountain all those people were really asked to endure in that respect was some grunting in the dark tent and the kiss/dry hump outside Ennis' apartment. I have a feeling that kind of thing goes down easier with the more reluctant viewers because it can be dismissed as "heat of the moment" stuff. (Their "glands" got in the way.) In Call Me by Your Name there's a slow build of erotic tension, with tenderness and respect, which may make it a tougher sell to naysayers who don't really believe the expression of same-sex attraction could be that intentional. But, as that great American philosopher Bette Midler has said: "**** 'em if they can't take a joke."

The ending is pretty stark; I can't think of any other example of a movie lead being held in an emotional close-up the entire time the end credits roll. Chalamant deserves his nomination for that alone; it never looked faked or forced. !SPOILER!: The book has a couple of codas to show Elio's emotional evolution after that summer, once eight years later when Elio visits Oliver's school and sits in on a lecture and again after twenty years when Oliver visits the house after Elio's father has died. We learn then that they have written to each other over the years and that each has kept the other's letters. On this final occasion Elio has hopes that Oliver will remember to call him "Oliver", something which he has previously forgotten to do, but there is uncertainty. It was probably a good choice to end the movie soon after that summer with each having acknowledged the other by their own name during the phone call, but for me there was still a gnawing feeling at the end of the movie that Elio may have been damaged in the way which Oliver had hoped he wouldn't be. In the book we got to see with more certainty Elio's acceptance of how their lives had turned out. 

Anyway, as an old man looking back I can see myself in each of those men at their respective ages. It's a great job of filming one of those "unfilmable" books.

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