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Call Me by Your Name

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38 minutes ago, rayban said:

Yes, "it's a great job of filming one of those 'unfilmable' books."

merlin_130052999_b18a7d0e-7a56-43d3-aca7

An absolutely gorgeous picture.

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1 hour ago, rayban said:

Yes, "it's a great job of filming one of those 'unfilmable' books."

merlin_130052999_b18a7d0e-7a56-43d3-aca7

A film couple for the ages

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The people responding to this thread have done a good job of letting us know what they think of this movie, but I'm wondering what they've heard from other sources. My husband and I had planned to see the movie together, but in the meantime he had read a bunch of stuff on Facebook about how it was too slow-paced and that it was all "bike rides and picnics." I never try to coerce him into doing anything (and expect the same) so I went alone, which I have no trouble at all doing. I have no problem with movies which unfold at a leisurely pace; it can put me in a state of bliss but I know it bugs people who aren't the "Merchant-Ivory type". I'm curious what others have heard about it, specifically anything negative, because I didn't find much fault with it. I'm one of those old f*arts who never joined Facebook, though I respect its value to others. I know how exhausting exposure to negativity can be just from my experience with some posters on these Message Boards, but I have to admit I'm curious why some people, especially gay people, would have negative feelings about Call Me by Your Name, other than the mere fact of it being a same-sex love story. Can anyone fill me in?

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I saw the movie twice- yes it's a bit slow at first the film has a real European feel to it- but it's not dull- yes it does take a while for the gay action to get started but it's worth the wait. I really don't understand how any gay man would be against this movie unless they were never a teen age boy in love- which we all know can be a very painful situation.  I did read some ridiculous comment on how the boy's life is too privilege (?!)  Yes these people are intellectual and obviously rich- but hey so what?   Yes there is plenty of bike rides but it's the Italian country side and picnics well let's just say you might have craving for peaches after the movie is over...

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Yes, I would "trifle" with a rosy rounded peach and then have my "Oliver" eat  it - eagerly.

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1 hour ago, rayban said:

Yes, I would "trifle" with a rosy rounded peach and then have my "Oliver" eat  it - eagerly.

That is a very hot scene...SPOILER ALERT

 

 

Another critic thought the film's end was negative because the character is isolated- yes maybe for a while but Elio will survive and be fine- a boy that attractive and charming isn't going to be lonely for long

 

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13 hours ago, jaragon said:

I saw the movie twice- yes it's a bit slow at first the film has a real European feel to it- but it's not dull.....

I did read some ridiculous comment on how the boy's life is too privilege (?!)  Yes these people are intellectual and obviously rich- but hey so what?...

11 hours ago, jaragon said:

 

Another critic thought the film's end was negative because the character is isolated- yes maybe for a while but Elio will survive and be fine- a boy that attractive and charming isn't going to be lonely for long

Thanks for the feedback, guys. I wouldn't be at all surprised if the facts that it's set 30+ years ago and in a remote, rural European locale both could be a source for dissatisfaction in some viewers. Nobody is constantly glued to their smartphone and they all interact, for God's sake. And the slower pacing would only prolong the agony until those viewers could get back to the screens which matter, their own. I know that's an unfair blanket indictment, but I still bet there's some truth there. In the age of Grindr, a tentative exploration of feelings seems quaint and makes Elio and Oliver seem as relatable as Pilgrims on the Mayflower.

The critic's argument you mentioned that the boy's family is too privileged makes me crazy. Love and discovery happen where they happen. That's another aspect of our times which bugs me: the mania for "egalitarianism" which would reduce everything to the least common denominator and make no provision for excellence, so that any indicator of superior intellect or achievement needs to be obliterated, the way Black Lives Matter needs to be obliterated by All Lives Matter. Like a boy raised in a home dedicated to learning and the arts needs to be humbled in some way. I was born poor and raised poor and I love the dynamic of loving mutual respect in Elio's family. The idea that such people shouldn't be attended to because they've achieved a place of comfort offends me, frankly.

The isolation of Elio at the ending is a more legitimate point and, as I said before, it gnawed at me a little too. But the fact that he's allowing himself to fully experience his pain, as his father had recommended to him, gives me the hope that all will be well. His immediate future is a holiday celebration with the family who love him and it seems likely their love will help define his remoter future.

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Well, of course, there is the ending of the original novel in which we do find out what has happened to Elio and Oliver.

In my opinion,  I do not think that they ever got over each other, and that they managed to live with and acccomodate that feeling.

I had a great love in my life.

I never got over him.

And, while I've changed drastically over the years, he is still very much a part of my life.

But, in a good way, not a bad way.

If I never see him again, it won't actually matter.

Because I see him every day.

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I spend a lot of summers in Spain when I was a teenager so I identified with the films setting .  The ending does not bother me- it makes sense- Elio is going through the pain of first love and in time he will recover

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The Italian Mansion From Call Me By Your Name is For Sale ...

1 day ago - The 16th century Italian villa from the Academy Award nominated Call Me By Your Name is for sale. Almost a character unto itself, the sprawling and beautifully preserved home provided the perfect background for the coming of age story. See More. Real Estate. Historic Italian Villa Cornaro Is On the Market ...

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3 hours ago, jaragon said:

The Italian Mansion From Call Me By Your Name is For Sale ...

 

1 day ago - The 16th century Italian villa from the Academy Award nominated Call Me By Your Name is for sale. Almost a character unto itself, the sprawling and beautifully preserved home provided the perfect background for the coming of age story. See More. Real Estate. Historic Italian Villa Cornaro Is On the Market ...

I might not buy it but I would love to visit

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10 hours ago, jaragon said:

I might not buy it but I would love to visit

You will.

01304cd6cd2d4bc0983ed7479979e6c5-01304cd

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Great interview with James Ivory on THE DAILY BEAST web site.  He talks about writing the script, the peach scene (that part of the his script is reprinted so you can it read it) and his movies/relationship with Merchant and their films MAURICE, ROOM WITH A VIEW, etc.  He also says what a jerk Weinstein was.  He very well could win an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay this year.  At the end he mentions about how, as a senior in college, he saw both ALL ABOUT EVE and SUNSET BOULEVARD.  Personally, since these are my favorite movies as well, that was cool to me.

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1 hour ago, ChristineHoard said:

Great interview with James Ivory on THE DAILY BEAST web site.  He talks about writing the script, the peach scene (that part of the his script is reprinted so you can it read it) and his movies/relationship with Merchant and their films MAURICE, ROOM WITH A VIEW, etc.  He also says what a jerk Weinstein was.  He very well could win an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay this year.  At the end he mentions about how, as a senior in college, he saw both ALL ABOUT EVE and SUNSET BOULEVARD.  Personally, since these are my favorite movies as well, that was cool to me.

I hope he does win the well deserved Oscar

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The one thing that I love about the film - and which is true to the novel - is the haphazard way that the love affair between Elio and Oliver begins.

It wasn't premediated or planned.

It just happened. 

That's why it will mark Elio and Oliver for life.

call_me_by_your_name_6.png

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I've been thinking about the film version - and, of course, the book itself -

I think that it's about the unliklihood of homosexual desire -

how it can hit us so hard and then leave a lasting impact -

CallMe6.jpg

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*spoiler alert* *spoiler alert*

Oliver isn't a committed homosexual man - he has "leanings", he can indulge them - but that's why he can walk away so easily -

Elio is exploring his sexual identity for the first time - with a neighbor/friend, a young girl; and then with Oliver - and that's why Elio is so "torn" - 

nobody was expecting what would happen and nobody knows what will happen to Elio -

at least at the end of this film -

of course, we do learn a bit more at the end of the novel -

oliver has gone straight and Elio is probably gay -

callmebymyname.jpg

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6 hours ago, rayban said:

*spoiler alert* *spoiler alert*

Oliver isn't a committed homosexual man - he has "leanings", he can indulge them - but that's why he can walk away so easily -

Elio is exploring his sexual identity for the first time - with a neighbor/friend, a young girl; and then with Oliver - and that's why Elio is so "torn" - 

nobody was expecting what would happen and nobody knows what will happen to Elio -

at least at the end of this film -

of course, we do learn a bit more at the end of the novel -

oliver has gone straight and Elio is probably gay -

callmebymyname.jpg

Oh so that's why some people hate the book?  In the film Elio is really changed by the affair- that's why he tells the girl he had sex with that they are going to be friends.

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As a Jewish queer, I'm particularly interested in the Jewish aspects of the movie. Elio's family are "clandestine Jews;" Oliver is far more open about his religion, wearing the Star of David around his neck. Later, Elio wears one too. On the other hand, Oliver is less open about his homosexuality, as Elio become more open about his. I think it's significant that the film ends with Elio and his family celebrating Hanukkah, the festival of lights -- Elio looks away from the fireplace toward the Menorah. One of the translations of the word "Hanukkah" is renewal; to make new.

There are a few interesting articles on the web, about the connection between the Jewishness and gayness of the film (and novel). Here's a quote from one of them:

"The film speaks to the ability of shared otherness to create bonds between people. Here, in the middle of Italy in 1983, a deeply Catholic country, are four Jews, nonverbally tied together by their shared heritage. One might go so far to say that Elio’s attraction to Oliver, which begins their whole relationship, is tied up in Oliver’s pride in his Jewishness, his confidence in being who he is — at least, in one capacity. Oliver can’t embrace his queerness in the same way, but the compounding of the two identities — queer and Jewish — ends up being an important one for Elio, who, by the end of the film, seems far more comfortable with himself than Oliver will ever be."

https://www.heyalma.com/the-jewish-queerness-of-call-me-by-your-name/

https://www.jta.org/2018/01/08/life-religion/5-jewish-things-about-call-me-by-your-name

 

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"

45 minutes ago, Swithin said:

As a Jewish queer, I'm particularly interested in the Jewish aspects of the movie. Elio's family are "clandestine Jews;" Oliver is far more open about his religion, wearing the Star of David around his neck. Later, Elio wears one too. On the other hand, Oliver is less open about his homosexuality, as Elio become more open about his. I think it's significant that the film ends with Elio and his family celebrating Hanukkah, the festival of lights -- Elio looks away from the fireplace toward the Menorah. One of the translations of the word "Hanukkah" is renewal; to make new.

There are a few interesting articles on the web, about the connection between the Jewishness and gayness of the film (and novel). Here's a quote from one of them:

"The film speaks to the ability of shared otherness to create bonds between people. Here, in the middle of Italy in 1983, a deeply Catholic country, are four Jews, nonverbally tied together by their shared heritage. One might go so far to say that Elio’s attraction to Oliver, which begins their whole relationship, is tied up in Oliver’s pride in his Jewishness, his confidence in being who he is — at least, in one capacity. Oliver can’t embrace his queerness in the same way, but the compounding of the two identities — queer and Jewish — ends up being an important one for Elio, who, by the end of the film, seems far more comfortable with himself than Oliver will ever be."

https://www.heyalma.com/the-jewish-queerness-of-call-me-by-your-name/

https://www.jta.org/2018/01/08/life-religion/5-jewish-things-about-call-me-by-your-name

 

"Call Me By Your Name" is such a multilayered movie that everyone can each viewers personal experience is drawn to a different aspect of the story.  It might be a bit early to call it a classic but it will become one with each passing season

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Yes, the moment that Elio sees the Star of David around Oliver's neck seems like such an important moment for him.

It's a stepping stone to the eventual relationship, I think.

The privileged "jewishness" of the family provides an encouraging context for the relationship, too.

In fact, it is a whole other world, as evidenced by the father's understanding words to Elio at the end of the film.

callmebanner.jpg

 

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Having read Mandy Berman's article, I would say that there is a definite link in the film between one's Jewishness and one's queerness.

But it is subtext rather than overt text.

Oliver can be overtly Jewish - but not overtly gay.

He embraces his Jewishness - and hides his gayness.

He says, at one point in the film, that he was attracted to Elio from the start.

In Oliver's presence, Elio becomes more aware of his Jewishness - and finally embracing of his queerness.

Who will be the more complete human being?

Elio, I think, because, at some point, he will say, "I am a Jewish queer".

Whereas, Oliver will be "married", "straight" - and, secretly, gay.

Elio has a lot - to look forward to.

Oliver - not so much.

Because, hiding one's sexuality and embracing one's sexuality can make or break a person.

Oliver walked away from a life-changing experience.

Elio simply says, "Yes, I am probably queer."

 

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