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LawrenceA

Call Me by Your Name

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"Call me by your name - and I'll call you by mine."

Interestingly, Oliver says these words to Elio.

In the heat of the moment, he probably means them, too.

But, in the end, Elio can say them and mean them - and move on.

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27 minutes ago, rayban said:

"Call me by your name - and I'll call you by mine."

The words are a paraphrase from the Book of Isaiah in the Old Testament:

Isaiah 43:1-2 

"But now, thus says the Lord, who created you, O Jacob,
And He who formed you, O Israel:
“Fear not, for I have redeemed you;
I have called you by your name;
You are Mine.

When you pass through the waters, I will be with you;
And through the rivers, they shall not overflow you.
When you walk through the fire, you shall not be burned,
Nor shall the flame scorch you."

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Thanks so much, those last four lines could mean a great deal to Elio as he gets out there and lives his own life.

"I'll carry you everywhere -

and you will carry me everywhere -

what we had can't be destroyed -

no matter what I do - no matter what you do."

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18 hours ago, rayban said:

 

Beautifully done. The finality of the train guy slamming the door after Oliver has entered the compartment is really poignant after the intimacy of their goodbye. I love that Oliver's shirt has become as important to Elio as Jack's became to Ennis.

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Yes, Elio is wearing Oliver's shirt.

The telephone scene is also poignant.

Elio is unable to get himself home.

From the subsequent car scene, don't you think that the mom had surmised what had happened?

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19 minutes ago, rayban said:

Yes, Elio is wearing Oliver's shirt.

The telephone scene is also poignant.

Elio is unable to get himself home.

From the subsequent car scene, don't you think that the mom had surmised what had happened?

I'm sure the mother knew. Elio broke down and started crying at the end of the phone call and his mother and father had probably discussed the situation. Plus his mother obviously had eyes and ears of her own. During the car ride she had sense enough not to press. Mafalda had probably put in her two cents too.

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Yes, you're right, mom and Mafalda knew all about it.

The final moments of the film - Elio's face through the fireplace - are heartbreaking.

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9 minutes ago, rayban said:

Yes, you're right, mom and Mafalda knew all about it.

The final moments of the film - Elio's face through the fireplace - are heartbreaking.

Not to be too crude about it, but Mafalda was the one who saw the sheets.

You're right about the fireplace scene. Again, the family is giving him the space he needs to process the phone call while they set the table, etc. When he's ready he turns and joins them.

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1 hour ago, DougieB said:

Not to be too crude about it, but Mafalda was the one who saw the sheets.

You're right about the fireplace scene. Again, the family is giving him the space he needs to process the phone call while they set the table, etc. When he's ready he turns and joins them.

What I like about the film is the unhurried, almost "accidental" nature of the material.

And the fact that Oliver and Elio are such different people - Oliver, secretive and self-protective; Elio, young and just blossoming.

Oliver's phone call to Elio about his getting married is perhaps an overture to Elio to get on with his life, whatever it might be.

It could even be "a love letter".

"I am moving on, Elio, but I haven't forgotten you."

"I wish you the very best."

"Because I loved you once - briefly, for a summer."

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I apologize for being late to the party, but I finally saw the movie last night with my mom. I liked the movie. (My mom, on the other hand, thought it was boring.)

The Italian scenery was beautiful, and I wished I was living there myself. I agree with the poster who said the movie felt like more of a foreign film because the characters spoke a lot of Italian. My mom and I didn't agree on many things about the movie, but we both felt Timothee Chalamet's performance wasn't Oscar worthy. We also felt Armie Hammer's performance was much better.

I must confess Armie Hammer was one of the main reasons I went to see the movie. He is one gorgeous man! :wub:

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14 minutes ago, jinsinna13 said:

I apologize for being late to the party, but I finally saw the movie last night with my mom. I liked the movie. (My mom, on the other hand, thought it was boring.)

The Italian scenery was beautiful, and I wished I was living there myself. I agree with the poster who said the movie felt like more of a foreign film because the characters spoke a lot of Italian. My mom and I didn't agree on many things about the movie, but we both felt Timothee Chalamet's performance wasn't Oscar worthy. We also felt Armie Hammer's performance was much better.

I must confess Armie Hammer was one of the main reasons I went to see the movie. He is one gorgeous man! :wub:

It's a film that can be seen several times.

I do think that Timothee Chalamat will be getting an Oscar for his extraordinary performance.

It's extremely sublte.

Armie Hammer should've gotten an Oscar nomination.

It's a fearless performance - straight, gay, both together.

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Elio and The Peach - 

 

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Despite the fact that the peach scene in the film is a much-tamer version of the encounter in the novel, it is still a highly-charged "sexual moment" for Elio and Oliver.

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On 2/25/2018 at 11:21 AM, rayban said:

Elio and The Peach - 

 

peche.jpg

Despite the fact that the peach scene in the film is a much-tamer version of the encounter in the novel, it is still a highly-charged "sexual moment" for Elio and Oliver.

I was thinking, after I saw it, "Should I part my hair behind? Do I dare to **** a peach?"

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On 2/25/2018 at 9:12 AM, DougieB said:

During the car ride she had sense enough not to press. Mafalda had probably put in her two cents too.

Yes -- there's a scene in the British Queer as Folk where Nathan's mother is in the car with him. She starts to tell him she knows he's gay. She's very sympathetic and loving, but he freaks -- stops the car, runs away. Always best not to put your two cents in, in such circumstances.

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Just curious is the author of the novel gay?  And was the story based on something that happened to him?  It feels like a memory.

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1 hour ago, jaragon said:

Just curious is the author of the novel gay?  And was the story based on something that happened to him?  It feels like a memory.

It's natural to wonder, without the interest being prurient, just because of the exact way he caught the characters. I have to admit I looked around a little, but the usual biographical sources didn't really offer much. He's known as both a memoirist and a novelist, so that compounds the confusion. The novel won the L*ambda Literary Prize in 2007 in the category of gay fiction, but that speaks to the novel, not the person. There's a nice short piece in the New York Times from 2011 called He Knew the Day Would Come about an empty nest situation in which a father's sons have finally left home, but the "He" of the title could make one wonder whether this is non-fiction or fiction. His novel after Call Me by Your Name was about a male/female relationship which had some of the same sense of urgency to it. I think the reviewer for the New York Times put it best: the novel represents "an open question" and I think that probably applies to the man himself.

PS I'd love to know why L*ambda was flagged. Wierd.

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1 hour ago, jaragon said:

Just curious is the author of the novel gay?  And was the story based on something that happened to him?  It feels like a memory.

It's clear that the author's Jewish roots played a part in the novel. He's talked about how, as a Jewish boy growing up in Alexandria, Egypt, he felt as if he had to be a "Jew of discretion," as Elio and his family are in Call Me by Your Name. Aciman told The Times of Israel that he could never write the book without Jewish content. It seems logical that the author must be gay, if one aspect of his upbringing simply had to be included, one might assume he identifies with Elio and that he (Aciman) is gay as well.

 

 

 

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44 minutes ago, Swithin said:

It's clear that the author's Jewish roots played a part in the novel. He's talked about how, as a Jewish boy growing up in Alexandria, Egypt, he felt as if he had to be a "Jew of discretion," as Elio and his family are in Call Me by Your Name. Aciman told The Times of Israel that he could never write the book without Jewish content. It seems logical that the author must be gay, if one aspect of his upbringing simply had to be included, one might assume he identifies with Elio and that he (Aciman) is gay as well.

Probably, but don't you kind of like the mystery as well? Somehow it seems appropriate. I was first drawn to Call Me by Your Name by the blurb on the back cover by Colm Toibin, author of The Master, an amazing novelization of the life of Henry James. James' sexual leanings weren't directly addressed but Toibin expertly and subliminally made the reader aware that there was something central to James' character and being which was never made to be central to his life, and there wasn't much doubt what that was. I have no idea whether Toibin is gay but I think both he and Aciman have an uncanny ability to touch on the humanity (and sexuality) of a person wherever they look. In a way, it's the duty of the author to disappear in service to the writing and Aciman seems to have done that.

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For me, the novel is definitely the work of a gay man.

It is so specific.

When I was reading it, I got lost in its' magic and mystery.

Because the author couldn't have known his subject better.

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I don't think a straight writer could have written this story; but hey look at the other classic gay movie romance- "Brokeback Mountain" based on short story by Annie Proulx, a straight women with several children.  A great fiction writer can bring life to any subject.   

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My best friend and I finally got to see it yesterday at the neighborhood AMC, which was having special pre-Academy Award screenings of some of the Best Picture nominees.   It is such a beautiful and haunting film.  We had dinner at a local Italian restaurant after the film and couldn’t stop talking about it and we both can’t wait to see it again. 

I’m a fan of Merchant-Ivory films and agree with the comments comparing it to “A Room with a View” and “Maurice”.  Yes, the film is leisurely paced, and I’ve heard complaints that it’s too slow, but it never felt slow or overlong to me.  In fact, when the goodbye scene occurred at the train station, I was thinking, no way can it be this close to the end yet, it didn’t feel like the movie clocked in at 132 minutes.

It deserves all of the accolades it is receiving, including Timothee Chalamet’s Oscar nomination for his magnificent performance.  I certainly hope James Ivory wins the Oscar for his screenplay. 

My buddy and I also agree that Armie Hammer should have received an Oscar nomination for his terrific performance.  And we both definitely want to see more of Armie now and catch up on his other movies!

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