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Princess of Tap

Briefly Lyrical

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That's F.D.R. Jones, sung by Judy Garland in Babes on Broadway.  The song by Harold Rome was originally introduced by Rex Ingram in the 1938 satirical musical revue Sing Out the News.  

Here's Judy's version:

 

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You are correct, Starlit.  Judy actually sang the song on the radio in 1939, as well as recording it that same year.  She sang it again in "Babes On Broadway" in 1941.

Star, you're up next.

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Let's see who can identify this one:

How's it gonna to help me?

Where's it gonna get me?

Why let my cares upset me?

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Song is from a mid-30's musical that is best remembered today for one particular number (the lyrics quoted above aren't from that number) that served as the springing board to stardom for one of its performers.

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Song is first sung by an actor who started out as a band singer and who went on to play a singing cowboy in many B movies.  He made his film debut in this movie.  After he sings the song, there are numerous other choruses with a number of people singing a line here and there.  In conclusion, the song is sung again by an actress who worked in films and on stage and and who usually appeared in blackface, as she did in this film. 

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The song is "I'm Laughing" from the 1934 film "Stand Up And Cheer".  It was sung by Dick Foran, who was billed as Nick Foran in his early pictures.  The actress in blackface was Tess Gardella, who played Queenie in the original stage production of "Show Boat".  The movie was a springboard to stardom for Shirley Temple, who sang "Baby, Take A Bow" with James Dunn.  Here is "I'm Laughing". 

 

   

 

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The singing cowboy clue got me started in the right direction.  In the mid to late thirties, Dick Foran was under contract to Warner Bros. and he was billed as "The Singing Cowboy".  His singing style was much more like Nelson Eddy than Gene Autry or Tex Ritter.  Some of his westerns were shown on TCM within the last few months on Saturday mornings. 

Now, do you know this one?

Do you know just how highly you rate

You should thank your lucky stars, and I mean

You should thank all forty-eight

 

 Obviously, the song was written before Alaska and Hawaii became states.  That really narrows it down, doesn't it?

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Sorry.  I kind of lost track of this thread.  The song is from a musical comedy with a military setting.  It was made prior to the U.S. involvement in World War II.  It was performed by a singing group.

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That last hint did the trick.  The song is You're a Lucky Fellow, Mr. Smith, sung by the Andrews Sisters in Buck Privates:

 

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Correctomundo, Starliteyes.  It was the movie that catapulted Bud and Lou to stardom.  It was released early in 1941, before the U.S. entered World War II.  The boys made two other service comedies that year, "In The Navy" and "Keep'em Flying".  "In The Navy" also included the Andrews Sisters.

Well done, Starlit.  It's your turn next.

  

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A popular song written in the 30's served as the title of this early 40's musical, but was not sung in the movie, the most likely reason being that another songwriting team wrote the score for the movie.  However, it did play over the opening credits and as background music.

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The song is "You Started Something" from the movie "Moon Over Miami".  The movie starred Don Ameche, Betty Grable, Robert Cummings, Carole Landis, Jack Haley,, and Charlotte Greenwood.  I believe they all had a hand in singing it at different points in the film.  Here is a short clip:

  

 

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That's right, Miles.  It was written by Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin, as were all the other songs in the movie.  The title song, not sung in the movie, was written by Joe Burke and Edgar Leslie in 1935.

Back to you, Miles!

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You are correct, Starlit.  It was an Irving Berlin song and a very energetic dance by Donald O'Connor.   Thank you for posting the clip.  The thread is yours now. 

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The song is sung by the stars and chorus as the opening song in a show that takes place at the end of the picture. 

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Excellent work, Miles!  I thought it would take a little longer for someone to get this, but I was wrong.

Once again, it's your turn.

 

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Jack and Jill went up a hill,

And for all I know, they're up there still

 

Not much to go on.  If you need a hint, just ask.

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