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Princess of Tap

Briefly Lyrical

205 posts in this topic

14 minutes ago, starliteyes said:

I'm thinking that lyric is from You Couldn't Be Cuter from Joy of Living.

You are quite right, Jerome Kern's song, beautifully sung by Irene Dunne.

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Song is from a 30's Fox musical and was a major hit recording for its star.  Its been recorded by a number of other vocalists over the years.

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On 5/22/2018 at 9:47 PM, starliteyes said:

Song is from a 30's Fox musical and was a major hit recording for its star.  Its been recorded by a number of other vocalists over the years.

Star-- Do you have another non-lyrical clue?

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One of the stars of the picture was a very powerful and feared gossip columnist and radio commentator in the 1930's and 40's, who actually made a few movies in which he always played himself.  

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Star-- Thanks for the more than a hint of inside information because I'm not a big fan of Fox musicals, although I really like some of their Technicolor extravaganzas they made during the war.

I think the movie you are referring to is Wake Up and Live from 1937 starring Alice Faye.

 The song I'm going to guess is " Never in a Million Years" because I had a 45 of it sung by Linda Scott for the pop teenage crowd.

 So since she sang standards I'm just guessing that that's the one you're talking about because a lot of people have recorded it over the years.

It's written by Mack Gordon and Harry Revel.

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Oh, Princess, you're so close and yet...

Never in a Million Years was sung by Jack Haley (actually dubbed by Buddy Clark) in the film.  The song I'm referring to was sung by the female star, who actually was a singer.  

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42 minutes ago, starliteyes said:

Oh, Princess, you're so close and yet...

Never in a Million Years was sung by Jack Haley (actually dubbed by Buddy Clark) in the film.  The song I'm referring to was sung by the female star, who actually was a singer.  

 On this one I guessed, wrong so I'll pass.

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Its been over a week now; so I'm pulling the plug on this one.  The answer was There's a Lull in My Life, which was sung by Alice Faye in Wake Up and Live.  If anyone would like to hear it, here it is:

Open thread.

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I know that one!  It's from Please Don't Monkey with Broadway, which Fred Astaire and George Murphy sang and danced to in Broadway Melody of 1940.  Love that movie!

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1 hour ago, starliteyes said:

I know that one!  It's from Please Don't Monkey with Broadway, which Fred Astaire and George Murphy sang and danced to in Broadway Melody of 1940.  Love that movie!

This is one of my favorite tap routines for two.

Star-- You're doing great. Keep up the momentum...

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This song did not become an all-time standard, but it was written by a very famous composer and Ella Fitzgerald recorded it for one of her legendary songbooks.  It's from a 30's Fox musical and was sung by the male star of the film.  (I think I gave you a couple of hints there, Princess.)

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"You're Laughing at Me" by Irving Berlin. Sung by Dick Power in On the Avenue.

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"...a love song taken from the whispering breeze..."

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On 5/31/2018 at 10:01 AM, Swithin said:

"...a love song taken from the whispering breeze..."

Hint: From an Academy Award nominated song.

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16 hours ago, Swithin said:

Hint: From an Academy Award nominated song.

Another hint: The film is known for a pioneering technical achievement.

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The pioneering technical achievement of this 1930s film is related to color.

 

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Further hint: In one of the film's early scenes, a Bronx-born actress playing a hillbilly traipses through the Appalachian Mountains barefoot.

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On 6/7/2018 at 10:44 PM, Swithin said:

Further hint: In one of the film's early scenes, a Bronx-born actress playing a hillbilly traipses through the Appalachian Mountains barefoot.

Here's the answer:

Open thread

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