Palmerin

Detected Any Good Goofs Lately?

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In Vidor's THE LOVES OF CARMEN the title character and other lower class women wear high heeled shoes, a footwear that in the Spain of the 1820s was worn only by women of the upper and middle classes. A gypsy such as Carmen would have worn abarcas, alpargatas, espadrilles or any of several types of slippers, or else simply go barefoot, as Julia Migenes-Johnson does in Rosi's CARMEN.

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What, you don't approve of Jerusalem being recognized as the capital city of Israel?

Puerto Rico has no love for Palestinians because of the Lod Airport massacre of 30 May 1972, a very painful memory in the history of PR.

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On 12/6/2017 at 11:10 AM, Palmerin said:

In Vidor's THE LOVES OF CARMEN the title character and other lower class women wear high heeled shoes, a footwear that in the Spain of the 1820s was worn only by women of the upper and middle classes. A gypsy such as Carmen would have worn abarcas, alpargatas, espadrilles or any of several types of slippers, or else simply go barefoot, as Julia Migenes-Johnson does in Rosi's CARMEN.

Good catch! I'll have to think about this since I always watch for all the famous goofs in films, like characters wearing watches in ancient times, and telephone wires on films set way back, and women like Lee Remick changing from a skirt to slacks as they move from room to room but haven't lately been paying much attention.

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5 hours ago, Palmerin said:

What, you don't approve of Jerusalem being recognized as the capital city of Israel?

Puerto Rico has no love for Palestinians because of the Lod Airport massacre of 30 May 1972, a very painful memory in the history of PR.

I really don't approve of changes either, Palmerin.

I'm still mad about Istanbul and Constantinople.

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40 minutes ago, CaveGirl said:

I really don't approve of changes either, Palmerin.

I'm still mad about Istanbul and Constantinople.

Yeah, and THEN there's that whole "Beijing" thing we all had to get used to a while back!

(...ya know, I always wondered what Chuck Heston and Ava Gardner thought of that after spending 55 days in the place and before they changed the name on 'em?!)

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You talking about Peking Duck, sucka?

Speaking of changes that were just not right. Changing Cape Canaveral to Cape Kennedy. No offense to JFK but it just did not have the same ring at all.

This brings up a good subject for a topic here. Movie title changes, from like British films to American and so on. I think Top Billed should pursue it since he is a movie historian here in my book.

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Yeah! And speaking of Peking.."Duck, You Sucker!"

Right there you'd have an example of a film with a number of different titles, as you may have known and perhaps the reason you've brought this up. The other titles for this Rod Steiger and James Coburn starring spaghetti western being "A Fistful of Dynamite" and "Once Upon a Time...the Revolution".

(...I think though that a number of threads about this very thing have been done in the past around here, and not to mention we're now sidetracking this thread about Palmerin's foot fetish, ahem, sorry, I mean his zeroing in on the anachronistic footwear to be seen in the film THE LOVES OF CARMEN, that is) 

 

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I had no idea Palmerin had a podiatric fetish, or as we call it in the trenches, a Chiropody Freak.

Palmerin must be a really big fan of the films of Luis Bunuel then, since nary a foot can pass in his movies without him channeling in on it with a giant close-up.

Just go check out "El" and "Viridiana" and "Belle du Jour" and "The Milky Way" and "The Discreet Charm of the Bourgouisie" and...well you get the idea.

feet-copywrite.jpg

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3 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

Define "good" in this context please?

Forget the "good." Just concentrate on the "goof" in this case.

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Footwear is possibly the item that movies most often get wrong. In the play-within-a-play of KISS ME KATE Kathryn Grayson, Ann Miller and the other women of THE TAMING OF THE SHREW show all wear high heeled shoes, which did not exist in the Middle Ages.

Hair styles are possibly the second item that film makers most often get wrong to the most ludicrous extreme. In GODFATHER I Diane Keaton wears accurate replicas of the rather unflattering styles of the late 1940s; in GODFATHER II, on the other hand, DK wears the 1970s part in the middle that Kate Jackson would later wear in her role as Sabrina Duncan in CHARLIE'S ANGELS.

Why this misstep after getting it right the first time? I'll have to ask Coppola.

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The Movie: The Green Mile

 

The Mistake: Coffey is sentenced to execution by electric chair. The electric chair

was first used in Louisiana after 1940, while the story takes place in 1935.

 

Timing is everything.

 

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I have always thought that "Mother" in A Christmas Story had a hairstyle that belonged in the 80s and not in 1939/1940.

 

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17 hours ago, Dargo said:

Yeah, and THEN there's that whole "Beijing" thing we all had to get used to a while back!

(...ya know, I always wondered what Chuck Heston and Ava Gardner thought of that after spending 55 days in the place and before they changed the name on 'em?!)

I'm not sure, but when that story was supposed to take place, I think it was still called "PEIPING". ;)

As to the hair-do in A CHRISTMAS STORY, I have an old photo of my Aunt Stella taken about '39 and she has a similar "do".  But I've mentioned other "goofs" in that movie before....

Like the house across the street from the part of the schoolyard in which "poor Flick" got his tongue stuck to the pole has both aluminum storm windows and an aluminum storm door. I don't think those came about until after WWII, yet the house I grew up in was built in '48 and had wood frame storm windows and screens and wood framed screen doors.  I remember my Mom having to go outside to change them every fall.

Sepiatone

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

I'm not sure, but when that story was supposed to take place, I think it was still called "PEIPING". ;)

 

55 Days At Peiping. I think that might have been the title for an entirely different kind of film.

thespiralstaircase3.jpg

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On 12/6/2017 at 8:10 AM, Palmerin said:

In Vidor's THE LOVES OF CARMEN the title character and other lower class women wear high heeled shoes, a footwear that in the Spain of the 1820s was worn only by women of the upper and middle classes. A gypsy such as Carmen would have worn abarcas, alpargatas, espadrilles or any of several types of slippers, or else simply go barefoot, as Julia Migenes-Johnson does in Rosi's CARMEN.

I thought about those shoes, as well. Rita even wore them while climbing the rocks in the scenes where they were living in the caves. Maybe the shoes were a gift to her from one of the parties where she performed for the upper class folk. You can't Flamenco Dance in flats! :lol:

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Sepiatone said: I remember my Mom having to go outside to change them every fall.
I just did that chore last week in preparation for snow.

Not a "goof", but I did see a veiled ganja reference in 1943's "THE IMMORTAL SERGEANT". When all the remaining guys thought they were goners-abandoned in the desert without provisions, they smoked what appeared to be a joint, although not referenced as such. They passed it and held in their breath, then settled to sleep. I doubt many in the audience even noticed it, or possibly thought they were just savoring their last cigarette.

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Near the end of "Rogue One", how did Jyn know the shield gate was open to transmit the Death Star plans? There was no communications between her and the fleet in orbit at the critical moment.

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