Sign in to follow this  
ѕᴜɴѕᴇᴛ ʙʟᴠᴅ

Recommend Underrated Romance Movies

24 posts in this topic

Why am i just finding out about The Fountainhead & Two For The Road? These 2 are hidden romance gems and i know i am still missing out on great romance movies so please recommend some that you don't think a lot of people know about, if you're a Romance Buff like me! I also recommend A Place In The Sun and Random Harvest, damn i'm trash for romance but i'm just trying to help ppl out

 

WeeAnnualIndianrockpython-max-1mb.gif

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A film I watched last night and totally love is CHRISTMAS IN CONNECTICUT. The romantic angle between Stanwyck and Morgan is really kind of "fresh" and funny. Seeing them finally get together in the end is a real treat.

Similarly the romance between a society girl and her butler in MY MAN GODFREY is equally fun and enjoyable. You can't help but root for them, whatever the odds may be.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could list at least 50 films, but I'll start with two;   Little Shop Around the Corner (Stewart and Sullavan) and Holiday (Grant \ Hepburn).

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the ultimate in romance - and neglected, too, - is Delmer Daves' "Rome Adventure".

It is almost anti-plot - although it does try to sneak one in at the beginning and the end with Angie Dickinson - but the "romantic feeling and aura" of the film is overwhelming.

As the lovers who do not go to bed with each other, Suzanne Pleshette and Troy Donahue are unforgettable.

Yes, not going to bed with each other is the key. 

Rome00010.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brief Encounter (1945) is a gorgeous, nuanced film, with noirish flourishes.  Two married strangers meet in a train station and fall in love.  Sometimes, commitment and responsibility, as well as societal norms, prevail over love and happiness. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spoiler alert.

One of the most powerful romance movies for me is Blonde Venus (1932), though it has its share of pre-code sleaze to temper the romantic aspect. Marlene Dietrich and Herbert Marshall fall in love, marry and have a child (Dickie Moore at his most charming). In a sweet family custom, the boy asks the father to repeat the story of how he met the mother as the boy drifts off to sleep. Marshall becomes seriously ill, to the point that his only hope is a very expensive treatment with a foreign specialist. How Marlene goes about getting the money leads her to shame and ruin, on the run with her beloved boy. She realizes she will have to accept the offer of a lover to take her away, but in a final meeting with Marshall the boy asks again for the story of how they met and begins to fall asleep in front of them. Marshall forgives her and asks her to stay and the lover (Cary Grant) takes his leave. It's melodrama to the max, but I always find the romance to be extremely touching.

Another gem from that era is Peter Ibbetson (1935), which combines intense romance with the supernatural. Gary Cooper and Ann Harding are drawn to each other as children but are separated. As adults, they meet again but their love is forbidden because she's married to an aristocrat. Cooper is mistakenly imprisoned and they are separated forever, except in their dreams, in which they at last die together. There's quite a lot of suspension of disbelief involved, but the romance is believable. 

I don't know that it could be said that either is "underrated", but neither is seen often and both are well worth searching for.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/14/2017 at 10:11 AM, rayban said:

For the ultimate in romance - and neglected, too, - is Delmer Daves' "Rome Adventure".

It is almost anti-plot - although it does try to sneak one in at the beginning and the end with Angie Dickinson - but the "romantic feeling and aura" of the film is overwhelming.

As the lovers who do not go to bed with each other, Suzanne Pleshette and Troy Donahue are unforgettable.

Yes, not going to bed with each other is the key. 

Rome00010.jpg

And i thought i've seen it all :D Thank u for this gem!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rayban's great recommendation of Rome Adventure got me thinking of another lush production with gorgeous European locales: Douglas Sirk's Interlude (1957). It came right in the middle of Sirk's incredible run of 1950's melodramas such as Magnificent Obsession and Imitation of Life, but it's not nearly as well known. June Allyson plays an American in Germany working for some kind of foreign relations bureau. She encounters an American doctor previously known to her (the incredibly handsome Keith Andes), but she's tentative when he renews his advances. Through her work she meets symphony conductor Rosanno Brazzi and that's where it gets hot and heavy. But he's married to a woman who has some kind of "incurable" mental condition, so there's a forbidden element to their passion. It all plays out in breathtaking homes and public spaces. It's a rocky romance to be sure, but beautifully done in the grand Sirk style. It hasn't had a domestic DVD release, so it's long overdue. YouTube has the widescreen trailer, but I'm not clever enough to post it here.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dougie, thanks for the reminder of "Interlude."  I remember it well as being highly entertaining, with gorgeous scenery and an intriguing plot.  I also remember the beautiful title song sung by the McGuire Sisters.  Maybe someday TCM will get around to showing this.  I certainly hope so.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about the film Invitation with Van Johnson and Dorothy McGuire as an underrated romantic film. 

(also the song Invitation is a really nice,  fairly unusual,  minor key,   jazz standard).

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Rayban, for providing us with this beautiful song by the McGuires.  I thought maybe I was the only one to remember this wonderful music.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, rayban said:

TCM needs to show this film.

Agree. I don't think they ever have. It probably used to air on the old AMC.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Agree. I don't think they ever have. It probably used to air on the old AMC.

That's where I first saw it. AMC showed Universal films all the time. As you know, TCM is showing some of Lana Turner's Universal movies this month and regularly shows Imitation of Life and other Sirks, so maybe they can get this one for us.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, DougieB said:

That's where I first saw it. AMC showed Universal films all the time. As you know, TCM is showing some of Lana Turner's Universal movies this month and regularly shows Imitation of Life and other Sirks, so maybe they can get this one for us.

Yes, we're finally getting to see PORTRAIT IN BLACK on TCM. So there's hope these other Universal classics will show up. Hopefully they'll do a month-long spotlight on Douglas Sirk. He certainly deserves the tribute.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, TopBilled said:

Yes, we're finally getting to see PORTRAIT IN BLACK on TCM. So there's hope these other Universal classics will show up. Hopefully they'll do a month-long spotlight on Douglas Sirk. He certainly deserves the tribute.

As well as Interlude, it would be a chance to see Sign of the Pagan with Jeff Chandler and Jack Palance and A Time to Love and a Time to Die with John Gavin, both rarely seen Universal Sirks from his "golden era".

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, DougieB said:

As well as Interlude, it would be a chance to see Sign of the Pagan with Jeff Chandler and Jack Palance and A Time to Love and a Time to Die with John Gavin, both rarely seen Universal Sirks from his "golden era".

Ooh yeah, I've never seen those either.

My favourite Sirk film is THUNDER ON THE HILL, followed by WRITTEN ON THE WIND and ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS. But I'm curious about these other ones.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with all these comments.  We really could use a whole day of Sirk's Universal movies.  What a treat that would be!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On December 16, 2017 at 2:00 PM, DougieB said:

Spoiler alert.

One of the most powerful romance movies for me is Blonde Venus (1932), though it has its share of pre-code sleaze to temper the romantic aspect. Marlene Dietrich and Herbert Marshall fall in love, marry and have a child (Dickie Moore at his most charming). In a sweet family custom, the boy asks the father to repeat the story of how he met the mother as the boy drifts off to sleep. Marshall becomes seriously ill, to the point that his only hope is a very expensive treatment with a foreign specialist. How Marlene goes about getting the money leads her to shame and ruin, on the run with her beloved boy. She realizes she will have to accept the offer of a lover to take her away, but in a final meeting with Marshall the boy asks again for the story of how they met and begins to fall asleep in front of them. Marshall forgives her and asks her to stay and the lover (Cary Grant) takes his leave. It's melodrama to the max, but I always find the romance to be extremely touching.

Another gem from that era is Peter Ibbetson (1935), which combines intense romance with the supernatural. Gary Cooper and Ann Harding are drawn to each other as children but are separated. As adults, they meet again but their love is forbidden because she's married to an aristocrat. Cooper is mistakenly imprisoned and they are separated forever, except in their dreams, in which they at last die together. There's quite a lot of suspension of disbelief involved, but the romance is believable. 

I don't know that it could be said that either is "underrated", but neither is seen often and both are well worth searching for.

They're both great films, from the expressionistic brilliance of Blonde Venus; to the genius of Peter Ibbetson, which Andre Breton called "a triumph of surrealist thought."

And like Hattie McDaniel, uncredited in Blonde Venus: I also know when a white man's browsing and when he ain't.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the smaller romance films are my favorite.

Check out 'One Summer Love' with Susan Sarandon and Beau Bridges.

'Old Boyfriends' starring Talia Shire--written by Paul Schrader, (and what a supporting cast!)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us