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drednm

THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE (1962)

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The films starts out in 1952 and involves a presidential election. That would make it 1952 of 1956, but no passage of years is implied in the film, so it's more likely 1952. The novel was published in 1959. The film is full of "time" errors. Here are a few I spotted.

The finned Ford in the foreground is a 1957 (possibly 1958) model.

 

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The marquee on the right for NEW FACES, a show that played on Broadway in 1962. On the left is a marquee for A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS, which ran on Broadway from 1961-1963.

 

vlcsnap-2018-01-06-21h27m33s159.png

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The marquee in back announces the 1962 re-release of PINOCCHIO along with the 1961 film PIRATES OF TORTUGA.

The marquee in from misspells the name of Debbie Reynolds. I have no idea what the .... FROM HELL movie is or how it's associated with Reynolds.

 

vlcsnap-2018-01-07-06h40m53s923.png

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Good catches.  I've never noticed those before.  Of course, I was probably too busy watching the movie to notice.

But in looking at the plot summary on WIKI for the book, it claims that it's "years later" that the nightmares and assassination plot is revealed.  It doesn't specify HOW many years later though.  Neither does the movie.

Sepiatone

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6 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Good catches.  I've never noticed those before.  Of course, I was probably too busy watching the movie to notice.

But in looking at the plot summary on WIKI for the book, it claims that it's "years later" that the nightmares and assassination plot is revealed.  It doesn't specify HOW many years later though.  Neither does the movie.

Sepiatone

Yes you are right, but the book was published in 1959. Since it's a presidential year that makes it 1956 at the latest. The film makes no "years later" comment and seems to pick up with Laurence Harvey coming home from the war.

In any case, this is a GREAT film and still says a lot about our country nearly 60 years later.

One of the funniest goofs I spotted was when Harvey is having lunch at the cabin with Jocelyn and her senator daddy, the film reverses for a second or two and we see Harvey REMOVE food from his mouth with his fork!

One source says the film was shot in an amazing 39 days.... So it's no wonder it's full of small errors.

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When the book was published has no bearing on when the story takes place.  THE GODFATHER for example, book published in 1969 but the novel's story covers 1945-1955.  

And "Candidate" published in '59 just before the '60 elections process gets underway, makes sense in a way.  I find no info on how long Condon took to write it, and possibly he had the upcoming elections in mind when writing it.  But that's just speculation.

Sepiatone

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Just now, Sepiatone said:

When the book was published has no bearing on when the story takes place.  THE GODFATHER for example, book published in 1969 but the novel's story covers 1945-1955.  

And "Candidate" published in '59 just before the '60 elections process gets underway, makes sense in a way.  I find no info on how long Condon took to write it, and possibly he had the upcoming elections in mind when writing it.  But that's just speculation.

Sepiatone

Possibly, but 8 years is an awfully long time for for the brainwashing to percolate..... and all these errors in the film are still after 1960.

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I'm more amused by the newspaper headline about the hurricane striking the Midwest.

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3 hours ago, drednm said:

The marquee in back announces the 1962 re-release of PINOCCHIO along with the 1961 film PIRATES OF TORTUGA.

The marquee in from misspells the name of Debbie Reynolds. I have no idea what the .... FROM HELL movie is or how it's associated with Reynolds.

 

vlcsnap-2018-01-07-06h40m53s923.png

It is not generally known, but Debbie Reynolds, desperate for cash, agreed to play the part of the walking tree in From Hell It Came.

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During this time, Debbie Reynolds also agreed to appear in the biopic, Best Friend From Hell, about her supposed best friend, Elizabeth Taylor, stealing her husband, Eddie Fisher. 

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Debbie Reynolds wasn't the actress from hell?  ;)

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I noted in Freidkin's outro that he believed Frankenheimer intended this as a satire. I'd never heard that before, but also noticed this @ wiki article: "... Rotten Tomatoes, based on 53 reviews, which summarizes it as "a classic blend of satire and political thriller that was uncomfortably prescient in its own time".[10]

Baldwin didn't seem to agree, but Freidkin said he remembered some 'funny' aspects but did't elaborate.

Maybe I only view it through my own, more serious historical context, but can ANYone recall just which are supposed to be the funny bits....??

:unsure:

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The only movie financed and directed by Eddie Fisher.

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10 hours ago, drednm said:

The marquee in back announces the 1962 re-release of PINOCCHIO along with the 1961 film PIRATES OF TORTUGA.

The marquee in from misspells the name of Debbie Reynolds. I have no idea what the .... FROM HELL movie is or how it's associated with Reynolds.

 

vlcsnap-2018-01-07-06h40m53s923.png

It's a double bill with whatever Debbie Reynolds movie was playing at that time (and the "s" might have fallen off the marquee) probably Posse From Hell (1961) with Audie Murphy, Lee Van Cleef, Vic Morrow and John Saxon.

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1 hour ago, mr6666 said:

but can ANYone recall just which are supposed to be the funny bits....??

The bit about 57 card-carrying Communists, for one.

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I sure don't see this as satire. I might have before the Kennedy murder/coup d'etat, but nothing since that black moment allows me to ever see this film as satire. The film is more relevant today than it ever was.

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I thought the early scenes about brainwashing might be satirical. Not

sure if it was a satire about brainwashing or womens' garden clubs.

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 No matter what still a superb motion picture!

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7 hours ago, Fedya said:

The bit about 57 card-carrying Communists, for one.

Yes, that is a funny bit.  I like that scene where James Gregory's characters says (paraphrasing) he needs one easy number to remember while he's holding the Heinz 57 bottle and the next scene he says there are 57 card-carrying Communists.  It is an excellent film.

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21 hours ago, ChristineHoard said:

Yes, that is a funny bit.  I like that scene where James Gregory's characters says (paraphrasing) he needs one easy number to remember while he's holding the Heinz 57 bottle and the next scene he says there are 57 card-carrying Communists.  It is an excellent film.

My history professor in college quoted the ketchup story as fact about Joseph McCarthy, and testament to the movie, most people believe it really did happen.

Even I'm not sure...Did Joe ever say "57", or did the movie just stick in our heads?  :unsure:

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McCarthy had two or three different numbers of supposed communists.

I believe 57 might have been one of them and also the fewest number.

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On 1/7/2018 at 7:38 AM, drednm said:

The marquee in back announces the 1962 re-release of PINOCCHIO along with the 1961 film PIRATES OF TORTUGA.

The marquee in from misspells the name of Debbie Reynolds. I have no idea what the .... FROM HELL movie is or how it's associated with Reynolds.

 

vlcsnap-2018-01-07-06h40m53s923.png

Maybe it was a double bill? I noticed that too!

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On 1/7/2018 at 7:35 AM, drednm said:

The marquee on the right for NEW FACES, a show that played on Broadway in 1962. On the left is a marquee for A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS, which ran on Broadway from 1961-1963.

 

vlcsnap-2018-01-06-21h27m33s159.png

Wasn't Paul LYnde in New Faces? Also maybe Alice Ghostley. Too bd they didn't have parts in Frankenheimer's filme.

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2 hours ago, RipMurdock said:

Wasn't Paul LYnde in New Faces? Also maybe Alice Ghostley. Too bd they didn't have parts in Frankenheimer's filme.

No. They were in an earlier stage version which was also filmed....

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