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LawrenceA

Dorothy Malone (1925-2018)

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I've created a 24 hour salute to Dorothy Malone. Except for one Universal title and two Columbia pictures, the rest of these are in the TCM Library:

DAYTIME (supporting roles)

Screen shot 2018-01-20 at 1.35.33 PM.png

6:00 a.m. THE BIG SLEEP (1946) with Humphrey Bogart.
8:00 a.m. TWO GUYS FROM TEXAS (1946) with Jack Carson.
9:30 a.m. FLAXY MARTIN (1949) with Virginia Mayo.
11:00 a.m. COLORADO TERRITORY (1949) with Joel McCrea.
12:45 p.m. CONVICTED (1950) with Glenn Ford.
2:30 p.m. PUSHOVER (1954) with Fred MacMurray.
4:00 p.m. SINCERELY YOURS (1955) with Liberace.
6:00 p.m. WRITTEN ON THE WIND (1956) with Rock Hudson.

PRIMETIME (starring roles)

Screen shot 2018-01-20 at 1.37.00 PM.png

8:00 p.m. SADDLE LEGION (1951) with Tim Holt.
9:15 p.m. AT GUNPOINT (1955) with Fred MacMurray.
10:45 p.m. TALL MAN RIDING (1955) with Randolph Scott.
12:15 a.m. TENSION AT TABLE ROCK (1956) with Richard Egan.
2:00 a.m. TIP ON A DEAD JOCKEY (1957) with Robert Taylor.
3:45 a.m. TOO MUCH, TOO SOON (1958) with Errol Flynn.

Screen shot 2018-01-20 at 1.44.02 PM.png

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Written-on-the-Wind-3.jpg

Sometimes it's about precious natural fluids. 

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2 hours ago, Ray Faiola said:

I loved her. Saw 1000 FACES as a kid and was hooked.

I do also (love her) and it appears most do, but she did have a rather odd career for someone that appears to be so loved by users here;    She didn't star as the female lead in any major productions.   Her most awarded film is Written on the Wind (I believe), and she won best supporting actress,  but Bacall was still the lead actress.

She made a lot of lower budget westerns.   Many of her films were made by non-major studios.    Many of her roles were not even secondary females leads  (clearly before Written on the Wind, but even shortly after).     

So she wasn't a major star and wasn't really a major character actor (say like Agnes Moorehead who was in many first rate productions).     It is really difficult to put her in any category.     Typically this type of actress gets forgotten but that doesn't appear to be the case with Malone.     

Either way Malone left her mark.

 

 

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43 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I do also (love her) and it appears most do, but she did have a rather odd career for someone that appears to be so loved by users here;    She didn't star as the female lead in any major productions.   Her most awarded film is Written on the Wind (I believe), and she won best supporting actress,  but Bacall was still the lead actress.

She made a lot of lower budget westerns.   Many of her films were made by non-major studios.    Many of her roles were not even secondary females leads  (clearly before Written on the Wind, but even shortly after).     

So she wasn't a major star and wasn't really a major character actor (say like Agnes Moorehead who was in many first rate productions).     It is really difficult to put her in any category.     Typically this type of actress gets forgotten but that doesn't appear to be the case with Malone.     

Either way Malone left her mark.

I think what happened with her is she started out like a lot of starlets, getting a studio contract and small parts (at RKO). She quickly jumped over to Warners which is where she had her first significant supporting roles in a variety of genres. This period goes from 1946-1949. After the Warners contracted ended, which I assume was a three year contract, she moved over to Columbia where she upgraded to leads in westerns and took supporting roles in crime dramas. And when her contract at Columbia ended, she freelanced and found starring roles in low-budget independent productions (namely westerns). In the early 50s, you either went into television or found roles in independent features if you were no longer under contract to a major studio. 

But what makes her different than other actresses that came up at the same time, is how she was successful at reinventing herself. So while the other ones went into TV and dropped out of sight in the 50s, she experienced a career resurgence. She ended up going back to Warners in the mid-50s, then signed with Universal where she really reinvented herself. When she earned the Oscar, she finally catapulted into starring roles at major studios (Warners wanted her back, MGM wanted her, Fox wanted her, and she was still working for Universal). Her career entered a whole new phase in the late 50s. But she still continued to make westerns, in addition to starring in high-profile dramas, probably because it was a genre in which she felt most comfortable. However, the westerns she made during this period were bigger budgeted affairs.

In the 1960s she hit her 40s, and her Hollywood film career did go into decline. So then she turned to starring roles on television. For over a decade, she had delayed going into television full-time, which worked to her advantage because TV budgets were now greater than they had been in the 50s and there was less stigma attached to doing a weekly series. She then entered another phase of her career starring on Peyton Place. After completing 342 episodes she was written out for medical reasons. But when she was ready to return to work, they had replaced her with Barbara Rush. So she sued Fox for wrongful termination and won.

At this point she was financially set and could be choosier with the projects she wanted to do. She had a starring role in an Italian film in the late 60s and back in Hollywood continued to do roles in TV movies as well as guest-star on her friends' shows. She married a Texas entrepreneur and moved to Dallas, which is where she grew up. But she still continued to work on screen if a part interested her.

She would return to Hollywood for big budget features, now supporting parts, which she continued to do through the early 90s. She had mended fences with Fox and was invited back to do two follow-up TV movies for Peyton Place, and this really cemented her place in television history. She also signed a contract with Aaron Spelling, so in the late 70s and early 80s she was appearing on his shows, usually in high-profile guest roles.

She had a knack for reinventing herself. Her career is not like other actresses from her generation, because she had so many successive rebirths. Who else could do wholesome roles and vampish roles concurrently, as well as she did? She defied typecasting, when you think about it. And she never left the public eye. She finally retired in the early 90s but at that point, classic movie channels were showing her old films so a new generation of people became fans of Dorothy Malone. 

Another thing that helps her legacy, interestingly, is the fact she made a lot of those low-budget westerns. A handful of them have fallen into the public domain so she has a batch of films that will always be easy to find, in addition to what has been released on home video by the major studios plus what TCM broadcasts. The Oscar gives her career a long-lasting legitimacy that other actresses could only dream of having.

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I'm glad to hear that she enjoyed making Westerns so much as she was in some very good ones.  In Colorado Territory, a Western version of the 30s crime story, High Sierra, she is the respectable but selfish "good girl" who is nastier than Virginia Mayo's "Tramp".  Later she's more than a match for Randolph Scott in one of his better films (I can't remember the name of it but it has Peggie Castle, Paul Richards and John Beregrey so you know it's good).

That bookstore scene in The Big Sleep reminds me of a similar but lesser one in a Burt Reynolds film, Shamus.  The woman is dressed in the same way but instead of amusing flirtation with a hint of more to come later in only a minute she's taking them off and bedding the guy just because--he's the star.  Bogie and Dorothy did it better.  R.I.P., Lady and thank you for all your fine work.

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Great info TB,  thanks for posting it.   I'm also glad to see that you understood my comments.  I.e. that in no way was I putting her career down but just saying it was unique.    You supplied the reasons why that was so.

 

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22 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Great info TB,  thanks for posting it.   I'm also glad to see that you understood my comments.  I.e. that in no way was I putting her career down but just saying it was unique.    You supplied the reasons why that was so.

You're welcome. I think what I find most interesting about her is she was born in Chicago, meaning she was originally a midwesterner, but she identified with the south having grown up in Texas. So she was kind of a chameleon who was able to adapt. And I think in Hollywood when you bounce from studio to studio, you have to be able to adapt. And she had that ability more than most actresses. She possessed raw talent, but she also had this great instinct about how to change herself to fit the studios' needs and make the public interested in what else she could offer them.

Her adaptability is truly remarkable. Especially when you consider how she played that shy bookworm character in THE BIG SLEEP, then did those cute cowgirl roles in B westerns, then played sexy vamps in Douglas Sirk melodramas, then played wholesome beloved Constance MacKenzie on Peyton Place. In her last feature, BASIC INSTINCT, she portrayed a homicidal lesbian and nearly stole the picture in her scenes with Sharon Stone. She was extremely versatile as a performer.

In my opinion her best work, which has not yet been mentioned, is a two-part episode of Route 66 called 'Fly Away Home.' It was produced in 1961. TV Guide called it one of the best episodes of any series produced that decade. She plays a nightclub singer who can't get her ex-husband (Michael Rennie) out of her system. When he dies in a plane crash, she shatters in a million pieces. 

Screen shot 2018-01-20 at 6.45.52 PM.png

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8 hours ago, TopBilled said:

I've created a 24 hour salute to Dorothy Malone. Except for one Universal title and two Columbia pictures, the rest of these are in the TCM Library:

DAYTIME (supporting roles)

Screen shot 2018-01-20 at 1.35.33 PM.png

6:00 a.m. THE BIG SLEEP (1946) with Humphrey Bogart.
8:00 a.m. TWO GUYS FROM TEXAS (1946) with Jack Carson.
9:30 a.m. FLAXY MARTIN (1949) with Virginia Mayo.
11:00 a.m. COLORADO TERRITORY (1949) with Joel McCrea.
12:45 p.m. CONVICTED (1950) with Glenn Ford.
2:30 p.m. PUSHOVER (1954) with Fred MacMurray.
4:00 p.m. SINCERELY YOURS (1955) with Liberace.
6:00 p.m. WRITTEN ON THE WIND (1956) with Rock Hudson.

PRIMETIME (starring roles)

Screen shot 2018-01-20 at 1.37.00 PM.png

8:00 p.m. SADDLE LEGION (1951) with Tim Holt.
9:15 p.m. AT GUNPOINT (1955) with Fred MacMurray.
10:45 p.m. TALL MAN RIDING (1955) with Randolph Scott.
12:15 a.m. TENSION AT TABLE ROCK (1956) with Richard Egan.
2:00 a.m. TIP ON A DEAD JOCKEY (1957) with Robert Taylor.
3:45 a.m. TOO MUCH, TOO SOON (1958) with Errol Flynn.

Screen shot 2018-01-20 at 1.44.02 PM.png

what about THE LAST VOYAGE with bob stack?

one of my favorite survival disaster films.

Image result for the last voyage

Image result for the last voyage

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On 1/19/2018 at 7:25 PM, Swithin said:

So sorry to hear this! Here's one of the iconic shots of the '50s:

e970cdfa1705cbb9629ad7fcbb972fa8--the-wi

 

Yes, I've always chuckled over that scene. Dorothy rocked in that part!

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Dorothy Malone won an Oscar and still didn't get mentioned during the In Memoriam segment on Oscar night. Badly done!

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Well, what else is new? It's ALWAYS badly done, year after year.......

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37 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Well, what else is new? It's ALWAYS badly done, year after year.......

 

Yup. You are right. This was the worst. Name after name of people I'd never heard of.

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

Well, what else is new? It's ALWAYS badly done, year after year.......

For the most part I actually do appreciate the IN MEMORIAM part of the show, but yes, all too often they do leave out way too many people.

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People actually have to PAY to get their people in there now. THey ran a story on it some years back. But Oscar winners should be an AUTOMATIC inclusion!

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

People actually have to PAY to get their people in there now. THey ran a story on it some years back. But Oscar winners should be an AUTOMATIC inclusion!

I recall you making this assertion before (maybe last year?), but I've never heard it before. I tried researching it, but could find no articles that state that people pay for inclusion in the In Memoriam montage. I found this article from Entertainment Weekly from 4 years ago that says the same thing that the article I read earlier today elsewhere said, that the Academy has a committee that decides who is "important enough" to include.

People have to pay for a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, but I can't find anything that says that the Academy ever accepted payments for inclusion in the montages. 

http://ew.com/article/2014/02/26/explainer-how-the-oscar-in-memoriam-segment-is-decided/

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Well, I remember reading the article. I'm not lying. Maybe it was posted here. It may have been in the LA times or the NY Times. I dont remember. Maybe they've changed "the rules" since then. But I did read it. And it wasnt an online article. It was from a newspaper or magazine.

Maybe it was to get considered, but there was some sort of payment involved......

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