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TCM Programming Challenge #38: Vacation Time!

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On 2/23/2018 at 3:24 PM, JamesStewartFan95 said:

TCM Programming 3 Part 1.docx 

TCM Programming Schedule


 

 

I like this schedule very much!

I have waited long for TCM to air: That Darn Cat! (1965) and 40 Pounds of Trouble (1962). I can only hope that your using it in your entry prompts TCM Programmers to take notice.  

 

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18 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

SPEEDRACER'S SCHEDULE 

AUGUST 4, 2019

 

 

Your schedules are at all times delightful! 

Charles Coburn is wonderful in all his movies. You selected several of my favorites.

I am not personally sure that I would wish to travel with Daphne. I feel the purpose of a vacation is to escape tasks but to keep 'her' out of trouble would be quite a lot of work!

It is interesting that you choose also to really get away by traveling far from Earth. 

Burt Lancaster movies are an ideal way to end a week!

 

 

 

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JamesStewartFan95's Notes

JamesStewartFan95's Notes

TCM Programming Challenge #38

 

Week of July 14th - 20th, 2019

SOTM: Angela Lansbury

The Essentials: In the Heat of the Night (1967)

Silent Sunday Nights: Metropolis (1927)

TCM Imports: Pather Panchali (1956) and Rashomon (1950)

TCM Spotlight: Directorial Debuts

TCM Underground: The Brother from Another Planet (1984), Hollywood Shuffle (1987) and Making Do the Right Thing (1989)

 

Challenge #36

1. Vacation Destination: Summertime in Paris!

2. Planes, Trains and Automobiles: Born to be Wild: A Tribute to the Biker Movie

3. Travel Companion: John Keating (from 1989's Dead Poets Society)

4. Desert Island Films: Six Weeks in a Leaky Boat with a Film Projector

 

 

Premieres

The Snowball Express (1972)

That Darn Cat! (1965)

Disney's Greatest Villains (1977)

The Best of Disney Music: A Legacy in Song-Part I (1993)

Play Misty for Me (1971)

The Great Muppet Caper (1981)

Greyfriars Bobby (1961)

Lady Bird (2017)

October Sky (1999)

The Iron Giant (1999)

40 Pounds of Trouble (1962)

Saving Mr. Banks (2013)

The Brother from Another Planet (1984)

Hollywood Shuffle (1987)

Making Do the Right Thing (1989)

 

Exempt Premieres

Forget Paris (1995)

La Vie en Rose (2007)

Quadrophenia (1979)

Mabel at the Wheel (1914)

Dazed and Confused (1993)

The Emperor's Club (2002)

The Sandlot (1993)

The Flamingo Kid (1984)

 

 

 

Totals for Each Decade

1910’s 1

1920’s 2

1930’s 11

1940’s 20

1950’s 17

1960’s 14

1970’s 17

1980’s 10

1990’s 7

2000’s 3

2010’s 2

 

Ah Paris! Magic! And in the summertime, it’s simply beautiful! Sunday starts with a series of movies set in the City of Lights. Starting with Marcel Carné’s romantic epic masterpiece Les Enfants du Paradis, we journey through gay Paree with the likes of Fred Astaire, Marion Cotillard and even Bugs Bunny. Cotillard’s masterful performance as the tragic, yet triumphant chanteuse Edith Piaf in Olivier Dahan’s La Vie en Rose will make its debut on TCM as will Billy Crystal’s 1995 directorial debut, the rom-com Forget Paris. In the evening hours, Judy Garland stars in a family friendly double feature that includes the 1939 classic The Wizard of Oz and the 1962 animated feature Gay Purr-ee. After a riotous Norman Jewison-directed episode of Judy Garland’s TV show co-starring Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin from 1962, TCM’s Silent Sunday Nights brings us an eerie vision of the future with Fritz Lang’s landmark Metropolis from 1927. TCM Imports celebrates the best of Asian cinema from the 1950’s with a double feature of Satyajit Ray’s Pather Panchali and Akira Kurosawa’s 1950 epic Rashomon.

Like a true nature’s child we were born, born to be wild! And so are the stars of these movies! Monday kicks off with a slate of films about life on the open road on a big black Harley Davidson motorcycle. Frequent TCM favorites such as Marlon Brando in The Wild One and Dennis Hopper’s counterculture classic Easy Rider from 1969 will be shown as will 1985’s Mask and the Charlie Chaplin-Mabel Normand silent short film Mabel at the Wheel from 1914. After an exciting look at Tupperware (did somebody say Match Your Mood), we salute the wonderfully talented Angela Lansbury, Jessica Fletcher herself. As Angela Lansbury was a huge star at MGM, most of these films will have been shown plenty on TCM, but I believe they are still worth watching particularly due to the presence of Angela Lansbury. Gaslight and The Reluctant Debutante are among the highlights, and underrated Katharine Hepburn-Spencer Tracy vehicle State of the Union stands out due to Lansbury’s performance.

 

Tuesday is Disney Day on TCM and we’re doubling down with two programming slates of Disney movies. The morning showcases films starring Disney voice actors. First Winnie the Pooh helps an allied battalion hold off the Germans in A Walk in the Sun. Then Timothy J. Mouse tries to stop Buster Keaton from stealing the woman he loves while Jiminy Cricket plays the ukulele in Edward Sedgwick’s Doughboys from 1930. The morning will also show off the serious acting skills of The Fairy Godmother, Colonel Hathi, J. Worthington Foulfellow, Maleficent, Ludwig von Drake and Baloo. In the afternoon, animators Andreas Deja and Floyd Norman join host Leonard Maltin for another iteration of Treasures from the Disney Vault. The animation legends talk about their times at the Disney Studios, Floyd during the transitional period and Andreas during the Disney Renaissance before showcasing another great lineup of Disney programming. This includes the premieres of The Snowball Express from 1972 and That Darn Cat! from 1965.

 

Wednesday kicks off with a slate of my favorite films including the premiere of Richard Linklater’s rock and roll love letter to teenage abandonment Dazed and Confused and the high stepping and fashionable musical duo of The Music Man and An American in Paris. All of these films mentioned truly made me think more about the power of film and I feel they best represent my enjoyment of the cinematic media. It also gives me an excuse to watch Grease. In the evening, our special guest programmer is the well-respected John Keating, professor of literature at Welton Academy who has volunteered his time to give us a fascinating look into his favorite movies including his two most-loved John Wayne films. The professor shares his love of the cinema and poetry by introducing his favorite film about a teacher, 2002’s The Emperor’s Club which will be making its debut on TCM. He hopes you enjoy this time together.

Thursday sees a slate of nostalgia summer movies including the 1993 baseball film The Sandlot, which will be making its long-awaited debut and is a favorite of mine from my childhood. In the evening, after a tribute to cartoon legend and icon Bugs Q. Bunny (I decided to give him a nickname), we wrap up an exciting Thursday with a salute to directorial debuts by such auteurs as Spike Lee and Steven Spielberg as well as the debut of one of my favorite offerings from Kermit and his friends, The Great Muppet Caper, the directorial debut of Muppets creator Jim Henson.

On Friday, we switch to a salute to the films of 1949, a usually unheralded year when compared to the year that occurred a decade prior, but one that is not without its fair share of cinematic riches. These include Carol Reed’s suspense masterpiece The Third Man and Katharine Hepburn’s strong performance as Amanda Bonner in George Cukor’s comedy Adam’s Rib. In the evening we salute the four-legged canine set with a salute to dogs and their masters. We then hand it over to Ben Mankiewicz and special guest co-host, Academy Award-nominated actress Saoirse Ronan for a night of “Ladies” at the Movies. Four films with the word “lady” in the title including Ronan’s own film Lady Bird directed by Greta Gerwig. Friday is also the second most exciting of the days of the week because TCM  will debut two films on the channel revolving around the subject of kids during the Cold War. These films, both oddly enough released in the year 1999, are the coming-of-age drama October Sky and the animated cult classic The Iron Giant.

Saturday caps off the week with a series of films dealing with the contentious nature of good vs evil as personified by God and the devil. These include the 1941 classic The Devil and Daniel Webster starring Walter Huston as the Lord of Darkness and the comedy Oh God! which offers a very unique perspective about our perception of God. I’m going to Disneyworld! But I’m not the only one, as the afternoon showcase on Disney as the vacation capital of California would attest to. 40 Pounds of Trouble starring Tony Curtis and Saving Mr. Banks starring Tom Hanks as Walt Disney himself will make their TCM debuts. After what I think is a long-awaited and deserved tribute to birthday boy and fellow Canuck Norman Jewison, TCM brings us one final guest host, acclaimed film director Robert Townsend to present a trio of films exploring the African-American experience during the 1980’s including the premieres of The Brother from Another Planet starring Joe Morton and directed by John Sayles and Townsend’s own Hollywood Shuffle, a hilarious satire of the film industry from 1987.

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And, that's a wrap folks! The TCM Programming Challenge #38 has come to a close. I'll have a voting thread up as soon as possible. Thanks!

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Wow. Lots of great schedules to choose from!  I've already commented on the brilliance of LP's and CinemaInternational's schedules and the great stuff goes on and on with the last 3 entries!

SanFins  --  Love your selection of "Hell" as your vacation destination  --  too funny!  Also, I guess we were both thinking about "Angels" and your use of them made a nice counterpoint to your trip to Hell!  Your birthday tributes to Toshiro Mifune, Leslie Howard and Robert Sherwood were wonderful.  Best of all was your section on "Never Believe Atoms:  They Make Up Everything" -  so very clever. 

JamesStewartFan:  OK, I have to say it: The People Behind the Voices is one of the best, most memorable segments I've ever seen in a Challenge schedule.  Incredible! Angela Lansbury as your SOTM is wonderful as is Biker movies, (what a clever way to approach the transportation challenge) the Bugs Bunny Tribute and the 1949 Oscar Alternatives.  Great job.

Speedracer:  Love, love, love Charles Coburn as SOTM  --  he's been on my SOTM "short list" forever and I hope TCM takes your suggestion and runs with it soon.  So glad you saluted May Robson (she's wonderful!) along with Lucille Ball and Robert Mitchum. Who knew they shared a birthday but it makes sense that they were born on the same day  --  two ultra talented, tough, smart actors whose careers went on and on.  Spaceships is a great transportation idea and your Traveling Companion, Daphne, is really fun.  Finally, a salute to  "Burt Lancaster's Body" is hysterical.  

It's going to be near to impossible to pick just one schedule to vote for!

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20 minutes ago, lydecker said:

Wow. Lots of great schedules to choose from!  I've already commented on the brilliance of LP's and CinemaInternational's schedules and the great stuff goes on and on with the last 3 entries!

SanFins  --  Love your selection of "Hell" as your vacation destination  --  too funny!  Also, I guess we were both thinking about "Angels" and your use of them made a nice counterpoint to your trip to Hell!  Your birthday tributes to Toshiro Mifune, Leslie Howard and Robert Sherwood were wonderful.  Best of all was your section on "Never Believe Atoms:  They Make Up Everything" -  so very clever. 

JamesStewartFan:  OK, I have to say it: The People Behind the Voices is one of the best, most memorable segments I've ever seen in a Challenge schedule.  Incredible! Angela Lansbury as your SOTM is wonderful as is Biker movies, (what a clever way to approach the transportation challenge) the Bugs Bunny Tribute and the 1949 Oscar Alternatives.  Great job.

Speedracer:  Love, love, love Charles Coburn as SOTM  --  he's been on my SOTM "short list" forever and I hope TCM takes your suggestion and runs with it soon.  So glad you saluted May Robson (she's wonderful!) along with Lucille Ball and Robert Mitchum. Who knew they shared a birthday but it makes sense that they were born on the same day  --  two ultra talented, tough, smart actors whose careers went on and on.  Spaceships is a great transportation idea and your Traveling Companion, Daphne, is really fun.  Finally, a salute to  "Burt Lancaster's Body" is hysterical.  

It's going to be near to impossible to pick just one schedule to vote for!

Thanks Lydecker! I really appreciate the feedback! I'm really glad you like the Disney actors tribute!

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