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dagoldenage

1947 movies

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I had 24 people vote for their top choices of 1947 (including some on this site). The results were:


Top 10 movies: 



1. Out of the Past - Not nominated

2. Black Narcissus

3. Ghost and Mrs. Muir, The

4. Miracle on 34th Street

5. Gentlemen’s Agreement - Actual winner

6. Nightmare Alley

7. Bishop’s Wife, The

8. Kiss of Death

9. Crossfire

10. Lady from Shanghai, The



Best Actor: John Garfield (Body and Soul)
Best Actress: Deborah Kerr (Black Narcissus) - Not nominated
Best Supporting Actor: Richard Widmark (Kiss of Death)
Best Supporting Actress: Martha Raye (Monsieur Verdoux) - Not nominated

Titles with votes: 79
Titles I watched: 129

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This is actually my favorite year in Hollywood history, with many enjoyable films. I like all of the top ten mentioned, although Deep Valley belongs in the top five or so. Black Narcissus is a huge favorite, and I'd be willing to call the Oscars given to Black Narcissus for cinematography (Jack Cardiff) and art direction to be the best choices Oscar voters have ever made.

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I agree with kingrat that 1947 was truly one of the best years in Hollywood. Most of the major stars were back full-time after the war. Post-war related content was now in evidence on screen. And television was still on the horizon, so movies remained the top entertainment. 

I have a list of favorite films on my profile, and my number one choice and number two choice are from this year-- CROSSFIRE and BLACK NARCISSUS.

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TopBilled:

 

You make a real good point about the major stars back full-time. I've often thought about movies that Stewart, Montgomery, Gable, etc. may have made while away. Wonder if there's been stuff written about this.

But, at the same time, it's not real fair to think about because they were all doing something far more important.

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I love 1947

It is the prime year for FILM NOIR

"hollywood" was about to implode.

But FILM NOIR was being BORN.

mY favorite film noir of all in this year is FEAR IN THE NIGHT starring DeForrest Kelly and Paul "Killer" Kelly.

It is low-budget and low-tech and takes you into the ordinary terrifying world of "noir".....

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the top grossing films of 1947 were:

1.  Unconquered

2. The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer

3.  the Egg and I

4. Mother Wore tights

5.  Life with Father

6.  Green Dolphin Street

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On 2/6/2018 at 11:34 AM, don96 said:

the top grossing films of 1947 were:

1.  Unconquered

2. The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer

3.  the Egg and I

4. Mother Wore tights

5.  Life with Father

6.  Green Dolphin Street

Don, thanks so much for this information. It's always interesting to learn what the contemporary audience wanted to see. Despite my fondness for 1947, I have not seen the top four box-office hits and have never managed to get all the way through Life with Father.

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On 2/6/2018 at 2:34 PM, don96 said:

the top grossing films of 1947 were:

1.  Unconquered

2. The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer

3.  the Egg and I

4. Mother Wore tights

5.  Life with Father

6.  Green Dolphin Street

 

10 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Don, thanks so much for this information. It's always interesting to learn what the contemporary audience wanted to see. 

The Bachelor & the Bobby-Soxer and The Egg and I tied for second place, and the other films on your list should be one number higher. To round out the list, here are the remaining titles from the top 20 box office hits of 1947:

  • 6 - Road to Rio
  • 7 - Forever Amber
  • 8 - Gentleman's Agreement
  • 9 - Cass Timberlaine
  • 10 - The Ghost and Mrs. Muir
  • 11 - The Bishop's Wife
  • 12 - Body and Soul
  • 13 - Miracle on 34th Street
  • 14 - Possessed
  • 15 - The Farmer's Daughter
  • 16 - The Shocking Miss Pilgrim
  • 17 - Crossfire
  • 18 - Dark Passage
  • 19 - Down to Earth
  • 20 - Smash-Up, the Story of a Woman

 

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a "suggestive" film - 1947-Paris

 

Get the whole experience in QUAI DES ORFEVRES

i love this film (one of the classic French ones) for so many reasons.

It takes us into the French Entertainment business in cold, gray, desperate 1947 in a way no other film can.

It's fun, and gritty.

It features an elegant Lesbian photographer.

It has great music, and is that most wonderful film of the "classic/noir" period (1940's, 1950's)---it's "suggestive"

so much sexier than films that followed it.

 

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On 2/6/2018 at 2:22 PM, papyrusbeetle said:

I love 1947

It is the prime year for FILM NOIR

"hollywood" was about to implode.

But FILM NOIR was being BORN.

mY favorite film noir of all in this year is FEAR IN THE NIGHT starring DeForrest Kelly and Paul "Killer" Kelly.

It is low-budget and low-tech and takes you into the ordinary terrifying world of "noir".....

That is a really good movie that's not so well known. I have the short story book of works by Cornell Woolrich [or under one of his pen names of William Irish] and enjoyed reading his original version way back before I saw the film. Personally I like the 1947 version you mention more than the 1950's one with Kevin McCarthy, but they are both interesting takes on the tale.

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1947 was a great year for Film Noir with films like Body and Soul, Born to Kill, Crossfire, Dark Passage, Dead Reckoning, Framed, Johnny O'Clock,  Kiss of Death,  Lady in the Lake,  The Locket,  Nightmare Alley, Nora Prentiss, Out of the Past,  Possessed,  Ride the Pink Horse, and They Won't Believe Me.

I favor 1946 slightly more but only by a hair;  The Big Sleep, Black Angel, The Blue Dahlia,  The Dark Corner, Decoy, Fallen Angel, Gilda, The Killers, Nobody Lives Forever, Notorious, The Postman Always Rings Twice, So Dark the Night, The Strange Loves of Martha Ivers, and The Stranger.

 

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Per the original post: papryusbeetle's mention of Fear in the Night was the 80th title in 1947 to get a vote in my poll.

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On 2/6/2018 at 12:11 PM, dagoldenage said:

TopBilled:

You make a real good point about the major stars back full-time. I've often thought about movies that Stewart, Montgomery, Gable, etc. may have made while away. Wonder if there's been stuff written about this.

But, at the same time, it's not real fair to think about because they were all doing something far more important.

I missed your comment and just saw it. Many of the movies those guys were scheduled to make were still made, just with other leading men who substituted in their absences. For instance, MGM used James Craig to take roles that had been written for Gable. 

Some of the era's biggest stars did not go off to war, like Roy Rogers, John Wayne, John Garfield, Dick Powell and Errol Flynn, which is a whole other story!

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2 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

I missed your comment and just saw it. Many of the movies those guys were scheduled to make were still made, just with other leading men who substituted in their absences. For instance, MGM used James Craig to take roles that had been written for Gable. 

Some of the era's biggest stars did not go off to war, like Roy Rogers, John Wayne, and Errol Flynn, which is a whole other story!

I doubt actors like Turhan Bey would had made as many movies as he did if it wasn't because many of the biggest stars went off to war.

E.g.  look at the number of films he was he from 1941 - 1945 and the major drop off after that.  

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10 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I doubt actors like Turhan Bey would had made as many movies as he did if it wasn't because many of the biggest stars went off to war.

E.g.  look at the number of films he was he from 1941 - 1945 and the major drop off after that.  

Yes, we'll never know. Some movie-making cycles ended. For instance, a lot of the escapist fare Turhan Bey did went out of vogue in the late 40s. And if you were an actor typecast in roles featured in wartime propaganda, you seriously had to reinvent yourself. I wonder what kind of postwar career Conrad Veidt would have had if he hadn't died. He had become very associated with playing evil Nazis.

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TopBilled:

I didn't know that about Craig. Which ones?

He's nothing like Gable (I guess no one really is), but I liked him a lot at times, especially The Human Comedy.

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7 minutes ago, dagoldenage said:

TopBilled:

I didn't know that about Craig. Which ones?

He's nothing like Gable (I guess no one really is), but I liked him a lot at times, especially The Human Comedy.

He took the part intended for Gable in THE HEAVENLY BODY, opposite Hedy Lamarr. The films he made with Lana Turner usually had him playing the lead, like Gable would have done. But while James Craig might have initially been seen as a temporary replacement until Gable came back from the war, he did well with exhibitors. He was voted a Star of Tomorrow and Mayer liked him, so his contract was renewed (several times). The irony is that he ended up staying at the studio longer than Gable did. 

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I am going to review CROSSFIRE next weekend in the Essentials sub-forum. I've been eager to cover this title since it's my favorite classic of all time. Don't know why it took so long for me to get around to reviewing it.

Screen shot 2018-02-10 at 4.57.08 PM.png

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1947  The NOIR year: PICK YOUR NIGHTMARE--IT IS HERE. and it will never be better filmed, either.

BODY AND SOUL

BORN TO KILL

BRASHER DUBLOON

BRUTE FORCE

CALCUTTA

CROSSFIRE

DARK PASSAGE

DEAD RECKONING

DESPERATE

FALL GUY

FEAR

FEAR IN THE NIGHT

FRAMED

THE GANGSTER

THE GUILTY

THE HIGH WALL

JOHNNY O'CLOCK

KISS OF DEATH

LADY  IN THE LAKE

THE LOCKET

NIGHTMARE ALLEY

NORA PRENTISS

OUT  OF THE PAST

POSSESSED

THE PRETENDER

RAILROADED

RIDE THE PINK HORSE

THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME

THE UNSUSPECTED

 

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I assume the above list came from the book Film Noir (Ward \ Silver)  because it is an exact  match of Appendix B,  from the book.

I assume this because no two noir books I have seen list the exact same films as being 'noir' since there is a subjective element to what is or is not,  noir.

 

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Another great noir from 1947 is Ivy, starring Joan Fontaine as a scheming social climber.  This film is set during the Edwardian era (early 1900s).  The term given to this type of film is gaslight noir.  The costumes and sets are great, and Fontaine is deliciously evil, with an off the charts sex-appeal.  Fontaine excelled at playing femme fatale roles. I wish TCM would show this again.

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I prefer green to noir, so I don't consider 1947 one of the great film years. My favorite 1947 films are Green Dolphin Street and Green for Danger, as well as the mystical Green Fingers. In the realm of noir, I do like Dark Passage very much (I'm one of those who think that Agnes Moorehead jumped at the end). 

1947 also deserves credit for introducing one of Hollywood's most glamorous couples to the silver screen: Ma and Pa Kettle, who first appeared in The Egg and I.

The-Egg-and-I-film-images-ff4f9681-eb38-

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cinemaspeak59:

I watched 129 titles from that year, but have not seen Ivy. Wow, I want to see this.

What are your favorites for that year?

 

 

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dagoldenage,

Are you going to create a thread soon for 1948? Just wondering.

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Among many favorites from 1947, here are 20:

Black Narcissus

Deep Valley

The Long Night

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

Nightmare Alley

Les Maudits

Odd Man Out

High Barbaree

The Macomber Affair

Night Song

Out of the Past

The Private Affairs of Bel Ami

Born To Kill

Crossfire

Dead Reckoning

Brute Force

Brighton Rock

So Well Remembered

Body and Soul

Miracle on 34th Street

I'm not sure which year The Lady from Shanghai and Secret Beyond the Door belong to, but they are also favorites, as are The Unfinished Dance, Gentleman's Agreement, Ivy, Pursued, Daisy Kenyon, They Won't Believe Me, and the list could go on. A Double Life has a spectacular sequence, brilliantly shot, lit, and edited, of the various parts of the theatre audience as Ronald Colman begins to go mad on stage. Hungry Hill has one truly great scene, where the dancers at a country estate begin to get progressively wilder as the fiddler's jig gets faster and faster.

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