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Det Jim McLeod

Your Choice For 1969 Best Song Oscar

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We are now in 31 days of Oscar on TCM and yesterday spotlighted some Best Song winners and nominees. My favorite year for this category was 1969. Choose who you would have voted for with your reason why.

THE NOMINEES

Come Saturday Morning from The Sterile Cuckoo

Jean from The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodie

Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head from Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid*

title song from True Grit

What Are You Doing The Rest Of Your Life from The Happy Ending

*=actual winner

My choice is Come Saturday Morning, it has a wistful feel to it and sets the mood for what's to come. The song playing over the credits while Liza Minnelli is waiting for the bus is poignant. The lyrics talk of "going away with my friends" matches up with the going away to college theme of the film.

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"Jean" and "Raindrops" were the only two of these songs that I actually remember hearing in 1969, when I was about 10 years old.  Hearing all of the nominees now, I have to stick with the old favorite among them, "Jean," which I always loved -- although I didn't know until now that it was from The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, which I've never seen in full. 

The other songs are all worthy contenders, however, and I can see why "Come Saturday Morning" is so well liked.  I just watched a YouTube video that played the song behind stills from The Sterile Cuckoo, and seeing Liza so young made me kind of wistful...

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I have no opinion, but sure would like to hear the instrumental version of the "True Grit" theme as done by the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band.

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9 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

My choice is Come Saturday Morning, it has a wistful feel to it and sets the mood for what's to come. The song playing over the credits while Liza Minnelli is waiting for the bus is poignant. The lyrics talk of "going away with my friends" matches up with the going away to college theme of the film.

Raindrops is less historically embarrassing, even if Saturday fits in with the film.

Back in the 60's-70's when you had a mix of "Love themes" and pop standards, there was a sense of what was the one song that would "outlive" the film--Saturday and Jean became Muzak staples and fit in with the film, but date themselves horribly.  And, of course, hum a few bars from the other two.

Now, in '84, you had a pop battle-royale:

  • I Just Called to Say I Love You, The Woman in Red
  • Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now), Against All Odds
  • Footloose, Footloose
  • Let's Hear It For the Boy, Footloose
  • Ghostbusters, Ghostbusters

Like most of the 80's winners, Stevie Wonder took it just from sheer radio-overplay hypnosis, but it's a fairly interchangeable 80's-comedy end-credits song.  But out of all the four, the idea of giving Ray Parker a nomination was treated as "What?  You can't do that, that's an MTV song!", even though Phil Collins's song dripped with his movie's bitterness, Kenny Loggins captured his movie's youth and energy, and those one or two earworm Ray Parker riffs just captured Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd's offbeat goofiness in a bottle and took you along for the movie's ride.

...That's still the standard by which I judge Best Songs of any year.  

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"one or two earworm Ray Parker riffs just captured Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd's offbeat goofiness in a bottle and took you along for the movie's ride."

I recall Huey Lewis and the News sueing Ray Parker for copping said riffs from their hit song "I Want a New Drug".

"Raindrops" sticks out like a sore thumb in "Butch Cassidy" and every time I see it a wonder what it is doing there.

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12 minutes ago, Craigmar said:

 

I recall Huey Lewis and the News sueing Ray Parker for copping said riffs from their hit song "I Want a New Drug".

I listened to both songs, and they don't sound ANYTHING alike to me. Think Lewis was just a sore loser that Parker had the bigger hit.

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June 8, 2016  

This from Rolling Stone magazine:

 

Ray Parker Jr. vs. Huey Lewis and the News (1984)

"Ghostbusters" by Ray Parker Jr. (1984) vs. "I Want a New Drug," by Huey Lewis and the News (1984)

The Case: Producers of the film Ghostbusters originally approached Huey Lewis to pen the film's theme, but he was already committed to work on another sci-fi comedy – Back to the Future – and declined. Producers tapped Ray Parker Jr. to do the honors, apparently directing him toward a sound that could be described as "Huey Lewis-esque." Lewis himself certainly thought so, and filed a suit against Parker, alleging that he lifted the melody from his own song "I Want a New Drug."

The Verdict: The pair settled out of court in 1995 on the condition that both parties refrain from speaking about the suit in public. All was well until Lewis unloaded about the settlement on a 2001 episode of VH1's Behind the Music. Parker sued him soon after for breaching the confidentiality agreement.

Why It Matters: Though no legal precedents were set, the lawsuit's ghostly reemergence served as a strong reminder that confidentiality agreements weren't just a formality.

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3 hours ago, EricJ said:

Like most of the 80's winners, Stevie Wonder took it just from sheer radio-overplay hypnosis,

All five songs were #1 hits, so they all received a lot of airplay.

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2 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Think Lewis was just a sore loser that Parker had the bigger hit.

Lewis would go on to get his own nomination for "The Power of Love" from Back to the Future, although he lost to Lionel Richie's "Say You, Say Me" from White Nights.  Both songs were #1 hits.

And neither of them were as big a hit as Richie's earlier nomination "Endless Love", or 1977 winner "You Light Up My Life".

Enjoy the earworms.

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9 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

We are now in 31 days of Oscar on TCM and yesterday spotlighted some Best Song winners and nominees. My favorite year for this category was 1969. Choose who you would have voted for with your reason why.

THE NOMINEES

Come Saturday Morning from The Sterile Cuckoo

Jean from The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodie

Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head from Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid*

title song from True Grit

What Are You Doing The Rest Of Your Life from The Happy Ending

*=actual winner

My choice is Come Saturday Morning, it has a wistful feel to it and sets the mood for what's to come. The song playing over the credits while Liza Minnelli is waiting for the bus is poignant. The lyrics talk of "going away with my friends" matches up with the going away to college theme of the film.

Was there a reason why Harry Nilsson's "Everybody's Talkin'" which was featured in 1969's Midnight Cowboy wasn't nominated? Did it not qualify for some reason?

'Cause THAT would've been my choice in that category that year.

(...always loved that song)

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I like RAINDROPS although it doesn't fit the movie at all but I like it as a song.  Some of the other songs are too syrupy for my taste.

I really like TAKE A LOOK AT ME NOW but FOOTLOOSE is a fun song that makes me want to dance so it certainly fits the movie.

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9 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Was there a reason why Harry Nilsson's "Everybody's Talkin'" which was featured in 1969's Midnight Cowboy wasn't nominated? Did it not qualify for some reason?

Wikipedia says it was written in 1966, and not originally for the movie.  That's why it wasn't eligible.

"Don't You Forget About Me" from The Breakfast Club is another big hit that was ineligible for the same reason.

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11 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

My choice is Come Saturday Morning, it has a wistful feel to it and sets the mood for what's to come. The song playing over the credits while Liza Minnelli is waiting for the bus is poignant. The lyrics talk of "going away with my friends" matches up with the going away to college theme of the film.

I wanted "Come Saturday Morning" or "Jean" to win. For some reason, I had an intense dislike for Butch Cassidy and for "Raindrops..." I actually walked out of the film. But I loved The Sterile Cuckoo, and The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, and their songs. (I actually bought the Jean Brodie soundtrack album, great score!)

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10 hours ago, EricJ said:

Raindrops is less historically embarrassing, even if Saturday fits in with the film.

Back in the 60's-70's when you had a mix of "Love themes" and pop standards, there was a sense of what was the one song that would "outlive" the film--Saturday and Jean became Muzak staples and fit in with the film, but date themselves horribly.  And, of course, hum a few bars from the other two.

Now, in '84, you had a pop battle-royale:

  • I Just Called to Say I Love You, The Woman in Red
  • Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now), Against All Odds
  • Footloose, Footloose
  • Let's Hear It For the Boy, Footloose
  • Ghostbusters, Ghostbusters

Like most of the 80's winners, Stevie Wonder took it just from sheer radio-overplay hypnosis, but it's a fairly interchangeable 80's-comedy end-credits song.  But out of all the four, the idea of giving Ray Parker a nomination was treated as "What?  You can't do that, that's an MTV song!", even though Phil Collins's song dripped with his movie's bitterness, Kenny Loggins captured his movie's youth and energy, and those one or two earworm Ray Parker riffs just captured Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd's offbeat goofiness in a bottle and took you along for the movie's ride.

...That's still the standard by which I judge Best Songs of any year.  

Is there a reason why none of the songs from Purple Rain were nominated that year?  Original Song can be so confusing.  I often can't tell whether a song hasn't been nominated because it wasn't original enough, or because the Academy were squares.

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59 minutes ago, skimpole said:

Is there a reason why none of the songs from Purple Rain were nominated that year?  Original Song can be so confusing.  I often can't tell whether a song hasn't been nominated because it wasn't original enough, or because the Academy were squares.

Purple Rain did get an Oscar for Prince in the category of Song Score (the last year it was awarded). It won over the Kris Kristofferson/Lesley Ann Warren film Songwriter and the family film The Muppets Take Manhattan.

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9 hours ago, Swithin said:

I wanted "Come Saturday Morning" or "Jean" to win.

"Jean" just doesn't work for me.  It starts off by not rhyming: the first two lines need to be "Jean, Jean/Roses are green", except of course that roses are not green.  :D

(Yes, I know the leaves in the next line are in fact green.)

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11 hours ago, Swithin said:

I wanted "Come Saturday Morning" or "Jean" to win. For some reason, I had an intense dislike for Butch Cassidy and for "Raindrops..." I actually walked out of the film. But I loved The Sterile Cuckoo, and The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, and their songs. (I actually bought the Jean Brodie soundtrack album, great score!)

I liked the Butch Cassidy movie but not a big fan of Raindrops either. I groaned years later when it was ridiculously included in Spiderman 2.

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4 hours ago, Fedya said:

"Jean" just doesn't work for me.  It starts off by not rhyming: the first two lines need to be "Jean, Jean/Roses are green", except of course that roses are not green.  :D

(Yes, I know the leaves in the next line are in fact green.)

Also...who told Rod McKuen he could sing?  It's not composer's privilege.  :angry:

Although '69 also gave McKuen a nomination for Best Song Score in his theme for "A Boy Named Charlie Brown".

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Does anyone know why "Goldfinger" didn't get a nomination for 1964?  Or any of the songs from A Hard Day's Night?

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