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Debra Johnson

Anyone know if "A Place In the Sun" was based on this story?

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I was just playing a game of online Jeopardy on my phone and a question came up in the category Books & Authors in reference  writer Theodore Dreiser's "An American Tragedy".  Intrigued, I immediately googled and the story sounds strikingly similar to "A Place In the Sun" starring Liz Taylor and Montgomery Clift.  Anyone know if this was a remake of a 1931 film (google revealed) titled "An American Tragedy"?

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4 minutes ago, Debra Johnson said:

I was just playing a game of online Jeopardy on my phone and a question came up in the category Books & Authors in reference  writer Theodore Dreiser's "An American Tragedy".  Intrigued, I immediately googled and the story sounds strikingly similar to "A Place In the Sun" starring Liz Taylor and Montgomery Clift.  Anyone know if this was a remake of a 1931 film (google revealed) titled "An American Tragedy"?

Yes, A Place in the Sun is another film adaptation of Dreiser's novel An American Tragedy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/An_American_Tragedy#Adaptations

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3 minutes ago, Debra Johnson said:

I was just playing a game of online Jeopardy on my phone and a question came up in the category Books & Authors in reference  writer Theodore Dreiser's "An American Tragedy".  Intrigued, I immediately googled and the story sounds strikingly similar to "A Place In the Sun" starring Liz Taylor and Montgomery Clift.  Anyone know if this was a remake of a 1931 film (google revealed) titled "An American Tragedy"?

A Place In the Sun is based on the 1925 novel An American Tragedy.     

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Just now, LawrenceA said:

Yes, A Place in the Sun is another film adaptation of Dreiser's novel An American Tragedy.

I see you beat me to the punch by a few seconds (ha ha).    But thanks for using 'film adaptation' instead of the more misleading term 'remake'.     Prevents me from climbing up on my soap box and I'm feeling lazy today! 

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2 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I see you beat me to the punch by a few seconds (ha ha).    But thanks for using 'film adaptation' instead of the more misleading term 'remake'.     Prevents me from climbing up on my soap box and I'm feeling lazy today! 

Please explain what you mean by the bolded.

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I'm trying to recall a great movie I watched starring a young Robert Wagner that loosely had this same theme.  He kills his gf who is preggers also.  I think the time setting for this movie though is the mid 50s to mid 60s.  Can't for the life of me recall the title and I own it on DVD somewhere.

ETA:  It's titled "A Kiss Before Dying".  Anyone else seen this and if so.....do you agree it is loosely the same storyline as "An American Tragedy" and "A Place In the Sun".....sort of a trope if you will?

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4 minutes ago, Debra Johnson said:

Please explain what you mean by the bolded.

Oh, don't get him started! :o

He feels the use of the term "remake" is usually inaccurate, since most films are based on a source novel or play, and that subsequent film versions are adaptations of that source work, and not a remake of any earlier films. The only time remake should be used is when the filmmakers try to replicate an earlier movie shot for shot, such as the 1998 Psycho tried.

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1 minute ago, Debra Johnson said:

I'm trying to recall a great movie I watched starring a young Robert Wagner that loosely had this same theme.  He kills his gf who is preggers also.  I think the time setting for this movie though is the mid 50s to mid 60s.  Can't for the life of me recall the title and I own it on DVD somewhere.

That's A Kiss Before Dying (1956).

Poster20-20A20Kiss20Before20Dying_0.jpg

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16 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Oh, don't get him started! :o

He feels the use of the term "remake" is usually inaccurate, since most films are based on a source novel or play, and that subsequent film versions are adaptations of that source work, and not a remake of any earlier films. The only time remake should be used is when the filmmakers try to replicate an earlier movie shot for shot, such as the 1998 Psycho tried.

If by 'shot to shot' one means that the same (or very similar) screenplay is used,  than you have my POV about 'remake' down pat.

E.g.  1952's The Prisoner of Zenda uses the same screenplay as the 1937 film, but I'm not sure it is 'shot by shot' in the same way as the 1998 Psycho was.

Also to me use of "remake" isn't so much about 'inaccurate' but just uninformative.

E.g. your comment of "A Place in the Sun is another film adaptation of Dreiser's novel An American Tragedy." is highly informative verses a comment like 'A Place in the Sun is a remake of the 1931 film, An American Tragedy".

Yea,  to me the author of the novel is the true source of inspiration for A Place in the Sun and not the 1931 film.

 

 

  

 

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The ending of THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE seems to borrow elements from Dreiser's story. (Different studio with different production values, MGM as opposed to Paramount.)

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I'm trying to recall a great movie I watched starring a young Robert Wagner that loosely had this same theme. He kills his gf

That's A Kiss Before Dying (1956).

How unfortunate for RJ. Almost like the shadows between Robert Blake's personal & screen roles.

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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I'm trying to recall a great movie I watched starring a young Robert Wagner that loosely had this same theme. He kills his gf

That's A Kiss Before Dying (1956).

How unfortunate for RJ. Almost like the shadows between Robert Blake's personal & screen roles.

How unfortunate 'this' is for RJ,  all depends on certain facts we will never know.   

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Theodore Dreiser, who wrote the book AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY, was a "realist" ( a literary movement in the U.S.)

and prided himself on never writing about any incident in his books that hadn't really happened IRL, to someone.

This of course, makes his stories rather serious and grim.

 

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