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rayban

Undeterminded Sexuality!

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David Farrar as Mr. Dean in "Black Narcissus" -

is he meant to be a gay man -

a gay man who has chosen to isolate himself from the world -

his beauty in a rugged sort of way is ethereal - 

27b6ba02ab42ffa84e3d44ce9eebb7d3--actres

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Farrar is a the male lust object that makes at least one the nun's go mad. Never thought of the character as gay

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He's often seen in very little - someone had a major crush on him!

He doesn't respond to any of the nuns - in fact, he's quite indifferent to them.

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The sexual tension between Mr. Dean (Farrar) and Sister Clodagh (Deborah Kerr) practically melts the screen! Also Dean has that line about the Sisters doing him a favor when they start to "educate" the young women of the village. The sexual innuendo was apparent.

I'd love to claim the character... but in this case, I don't even see any sub-text to support it.

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3 hours ago, Biff said:

The sexual tension between Mr. Dean (Farrar) and Sister Clodagh (Deborah Kerr) practically melts the screen! Also Dean has that line about the Sisters doing him a favor when they start to "educate" the young women of the village. The sexual innuendo was apparent.

I'd love to claim the character... but in this case, I don't even see any sub-text to support it.

I agree-too bad because he is kind of hot- the gayest character in the film is Sabu;)

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Welcome, Biff.

I don't know - I see him as a closeted gay.

But, hey, it's just me.

Remember he brought the Jean Simmons character to the nuns, because she was bothering him - hanging out on his porch and putting flowers in her hair!

He was also turned off by the runaway nun.

As far as his relationship with the Deborah Kerr character, he tolerated her - and was amused by her, too.

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The young prince, the Sabu character, is quite gay - so it's a surprise to learn that he runs off with the Jean Simmons character.

His gayest scene - when he explains why his handkerchief is saturated with the scent, Black Narcissus.

Black-Narcissus-1947-00-44-06.jpg

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I've always thought that Akim Tamiroff's character (Carlo Cibo) in Anthony Adverse is gay. 

Akim-Tamiroff-Anthony-Adverse-1936-000-F
"We shall drink to the past, forget the future, and pleasantly live the present!"

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49 minutes ago, Swithin said:

I've always thought that Akim Tamiroff's character (Carlo Cibo) in Anthony Adverse is gay. 

Akim-Tamiroff-Anthony-Adverse-1936-000-F
"We shall drink to the past, forget the future, and pleasantly live the present!"

You think:rolleyes:

 

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Although nothing was ever said about his sexuality, I always thought that Frederick Fairlie in "The Woman In White" was delightfully gay.

The character was played by John Abbot in an unforgettable performance.

11.JPG

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12 hours ago, rayban said:

The young prince, the Sabu character, is quite gay - so it's a surprise to learn that he runs off with the Jean Simmons character.

His gayest scene - when he explains why his handkerchief is saturated with the scent, Black Narcissus.

Black-Narcissus-1947-00-44-06.jpg

Is he checking out Mr Dean's shorts?

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21 hours ago, rayban said:

Although nothing was ever said about his sexuality, I always thought that Frederick Fairlie in "The Woman In White" was delightfully gay.

The character was played by John Abbot in an unforgettable performance.

11.JPG

A great performance indeed! Vincent Price does a version of it very nicely, (though not quite as perfectly as Abbot), near the beginning of The House of Usher.

Abbot as Frederick Fairlie says something like this: "In the wretched state of my nerves, loud sound of any kind is indescribable torture to me."

Price as Roderick Usher: "If you please... Mr. Winthrop...softly. An affliction of the hearing. Sounds of any exaggerated degree...cut into my brain like knives."

 

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18 minutes ago, rayban said:

I will have to see "The House of Usher".

I wonder if Willkie Collins got the idea for Fairlie's super-sensitivity from Poe, whose story was published in 1839. Woman in White was published in 1859. Here's an interesting piece:

https://english58501.wordpress.com/2012/10/22/trangression-of-gender-boundaries-in-the-woman-in-white/

In terms of movies, The Fall of the House of Usher has been filmed many times. My favorite is the rather odd British version (released in the U.S. in 1950), directed by Ivan Barnett, which I prefer to Corman's version with Price, although Corman's version is somewhat truer to Poe and more highly regarded. But the Barnett version (almost Dreyer-like -- so many creepy images) gave me nightmares as a child.

Fall-of-the-House-of-Usher-1949-2.jpg

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I wonder if this thread is confusing sexual orientation with dated gender preferences.   E.g.  just because a man loves "beautiful things" doesn't mean he is gay.     Just because a women plays sports or fishes and hunts doesn't mean she is a lesbian.

Sometimes I was questioned if I was gay because I had a picture of Judy Garland on my wall.   No,  I just happen to love Judy Garland! 

I really love the direction gender neutral is taking us;   I.e. that behaviors and tastes no longer need to be specific to one's gender.      

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4 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I wonder if this thread is confusing sexual orientation with dated gender preferences.   E.g.  just because a man loves "beautiful things" doesn't mean he is gay.     Just because a women plays sports or fishes and hunts doesn't mean she is a lesbian.

Sometimes I was questioned if I was gay because I had a picture of Judy Garland on my wall.   No,  I just happen to love Judy Garland! 

I really love the direction gender neutral is taking us;   I.e. that behaviors and tastes no longer need to be specific to one's gender.      

Of course there are straight men who love Garland and art just there are gay men who like football and guns yes its a bit extreme but you are right

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3 minutes ago, jaragon said:

Of course there are straight men who love Garland and art just there are gay men who like football and guns yes its a bit extreme but you are right

But is it 'a bit extreme' today?    Based on my personal experience these non-traditional gender roles (or what I call dated ones),  can be found a lot more frequently with the younger generation (say under 40),  than they were back,  say,  25 or 30 years ago. 

 

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Just now, jamesjazzguitar said:

But is it 'a bit extreme' today?    Based on my personal experience these non-traditional gender roles (or what I call dated ones),  can be found a lot more frequently with the younger generation (say under 40),  than they were back,  say,  25 or 30 years ago. 

 

I was referring to my extreme example

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Never thought about this but Roderick Usher does seem a bit gay-I love the way he says "merchant of flesh"

 

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6 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Sometimes I was questioned if I was gay because I had a picture of Judy Garland on my wall.   No,  I just happen to love Judy Garland!   

Here's a quote from one of the plays by the great gay playwright Joe Orton:

"You meet affluent men around here, and they're not all effeminate either, some of them are really manly & you'd never dream that they were queer, not from the look of 'em. But I can always tell 'cos they've all got LPs of Judy Garland."

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