Palmerin

A VAST WASTELAND

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What do you say about that famous (notorious) quotation? I would apply it to PBS, which is about as bland as vanilla yogurt.

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17 minutes ago, Palmerin said:

What do you say about that famous (notorious) quotation? I would apply it to PBS, which is about as bland as vanilla yogurt.

The unbelievable amount of braindead garbage on TV, and you target PBS? Really? Not E! Entertainment and the Kardashians, or Bravo and the Real Housewives of Wherever, or Honey Boo-Boo, or Dance Moms, or MTV and their pregnant teens as celebrities, or Dr.Phil/Maury Povich/Jerry Springer? I think this kind of programming is more in line with what the quote was referring to. 

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8 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The unbelievable amount of braindead garbage on TV, and you target PBS? Really? Not E! Entertainment and the Kardashians, or Bravo and the Real Housewives of Wherever, or Honey Boo-Boo, or Dance Moms, or MTV and their pregnant teens as celebrities, or Dr.Phil/Maury Povich/Jerry Springer? I think this kind of programming is more in line with what the quote was referring to. 

I grew up with PBS, and, with the sole exception of some MASTERPIECE THEATRE-type dramas, I never felt any affection for the deadly dull programming of that drastically overrated station. Nothing interesting for children, and very little of interest for adults.

You mention shows deserving of Minow's poor opinion; which shows and channels would you say deserve praise for taking to heart NM's opinion that TV had potential for more than soaps and game shows?

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In the world of crap like Duck Dynasty, Real Housewives..., Kardashians, The Bachelor, Vanderpump Rules, Honey Boo Boo, Honey Boo Boo's Mom, etc. and PBS is a vast wasteland??? 

PBS is fantastic.  Nova, American Masters, American Experience, the Ken Burns documentaries, Nature, all great.  In fact, right now I'm watching the "Sitcoms" episode of PBS' Pioneers of Television series.  I cannot comment on the children's programming because I don't watch it, but I did love Wishbone back in the day and I also used to watch Reading Rainbow.  

I also really like vanilla yogurt.  It's my favorite flavor. 

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4 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

 

I also really like vanilla yogurt.  It's my favorite flavor. 

Try others; the best brands of yogurt carry many flavors that are more piquant than vanilla.

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1 minute ago, Palmerin said:

Try others; the best brands of yogurt carry many flavors that are more piquant than vanilla.

I have tried other flavors thank you.  

I like the vanilla.  I don't particularly think of yogurt as "piquant," it's yogurt. 

I also like ::gasp!:: plain yogurt.  Maybe add a little honey, some fruit and/or some granola and it's very good and eliminates much of the extra sugar from the fruit on the bottom ones or the other flavored ones.

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There is NOT and never HAS been a better continuing documentary series on "the vast wasteland" of broadcast television than PBS's Frontline.

(...PERIOD!!!)

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Thanks for your replies.

Now here's something that NM did not take into account: TV, like all the other art forms, is a gigantic supermarket that offers everything from high art to cheap commonplaces, and its customers buy what they fancy. The House Kardashian may not be THE FORSYTE SAGA, but as long as there is a demand for their brand, they have the right to earn a profit from it, according to the most cherished examples of free enterprise. Consider that other gigantic supermarket, Literature. Grisham and King may not be Frost or Sandburg, but as long as there is a demand for their brand they have the right to earn a livelihood from the fruit of their labors.

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1 hour ago, Palmerin said:

Thanks for your replies.

Now here's something that NM did not take into account: TV, like all the other art forms, is a gigantic supermarket that offers everything from high art to cheap commonplaces, and its customers buy what they fancy. The House Kardashian may not be THE FORSYTE SAGA, but as long as there is a demand for their brand, they have the right to earn a profit from it, according to the most cherished examples of free enterprise. Consider that other gigantic supermarket, Literature. Grisham and King may not be Frost or Sandburg, but as long as there is a demand for their brand they have the right to earn a livelihood from the fruit of their labors.

I think that the literary equivalent of dumbed-down reality TV would be better described by the scribblings of The National Enquirer, as opposed to King or Grisham.

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1 hour ago, limey said:

I think that the literary equivalent of dumbed-down reality TV would be better described by the scribblings of The National Enquirer, as opposed to King or Grisham.

It would be really apt to use that term to describe Franzen and Foster Wallace. :lol: 

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6 hours ago, Palmerin said:

Thanks for your replies.

Now here's something that NM did not take into account: TV, like all the other art forms, is a gigantic supermarket that offers everything from high art to cheap commonplaces, and its customers buy what they fancy. The House Kardashian may not be THE FORSYTE SAGA, but as long as there is a demand for their brand, they have the right to earn a profit from it, according to the most cherished examples of free enterprise. Consider that other gigantic supermarket, Literature. Grisham and King may not be Frost or Sandburg, but as long as there is a demand for their brand they have the right to earn a livelihood from the fruit of their labors.

Could you explain whom or what you were referencing in the part of the sentence I had embolden.

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OK, MY 1/4 cent(the approx. worth of two cents these days):

Nothing for children?  Well, since mine are in their 40's now, I wouldn't know about these days.  All I can relate is that both SESAME STREET and THE ELECTRIC COMPANY helped them to be able to READ before they even started Kindergarten.

I too, like vanilla yogurt, often breakfasting on it with a banana sliced into it with some wheat germ mixed in.

Sometimes use plain yogurt as a sour cream substitute on baked potatoes.

But all the other shows on PBS that others mentioned here are fascinating.  As an all around music lover I'd add AUSTIN CITY LIMITS to the list, as many music artists I like would never be presented elsewhere on the tube, and GREAT PERFORMANCES too, offers up much better fare than you'll find "competing" on vapid pop offerings like THE VOICE and other shows of that ilk.  I mean, where ELSE could you see president BARACK OBAMA dance and sing on the same stage with STEVIE WONDER? Certainly NOT on TNT or TCM! ;) 

Sepiatone

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9 hours ago, Mario500 said:

Could you explain whom or what you were referencing in the part of the sentence I had embolden.

John Grisham, Stephen King, Robert Frost, and Carl Sandburg.

You are not from the USA? Which is your homeland, and which literary luminaries does she have, please?

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Thing is, all four of those mentioned are fine writers.  But their individual writing styles appeal to a variety of different people.  For example----

Many people make a big deal out of Ernest Hemingway.  I however, don't particularly like his style of writing, preferring Steinbeck instead.  I'm NOT saying one is better than the other, just that I prefer one over the other.  But admittedly, I did like Hemingway's "For Whom The Bell Tolls".  

Sepiatone

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I have almost every book that Stephen King has written. I've probably read more of his novels than any of Hemingway's work. 

I grew up on Sesame Street and THE ELECTRIC COMPANY. I also love the documentaries that are shown on PBS. So I can't agree that PBS has nothing to offer. 

King and PBS may not have anything to offer for you, but they certainly have something about them that appeals to many people.

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23 hours ago, Palmerin said:

TV had potential for more than soaps and game shows?

There have been some very underrated quizzers out there:

 

 

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28 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I have almost every book that Stephen King has written. I've probably read more of his novels than any of Hemingway's work. 

I grew up on Sesame Street and THE ELECTRIC COMPANY. I also love the documentaries that are shown on PBS. So I can't agree that PBS has nothing to offer. 

King and PBS may not have anything to offer for you, but they certainly have something about them that appeals to many people.

MANY PEOPLE ... of the USA, for whom CIVIL WAR means strictly one very specific conflict during the 1860s; they should learn the remarkable fact that every country in the world has had at least one major civil war.

I would gladly kiss the hands of Ken Burns if he created a documentary series dedicated to the Spanish War of 1936-39, complete with the complex story of its origins in the French Revolution--an story of which Hemingway knew absolutely nothing.

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30 minutes ago, Palmerin said:

MANY PEOPLE ... of the USA, for whom CIVIL WAR means strictly one very specific conflict during the 1860s; they should learn the remarkable fact that every country in the world has had at least one major civil war.

I would gladly kiss the hands of Ken Burns if he created a documentary series dedicated to the Spanish War of 1936-39, complete with the complex story of its origins in the French Revolution--an story of which Hemingway knew absolutely nothing.

Ken Burns typically concentrates on subjects closer to American history, but I'm sure PBS has produced documentaries that covered elements of what was a complex story on the Spanish civil war - you're unlikely to find much better on any of the commercial US domestic channels, possibly because it wouldn't attract advertising as well as subjects more familiar to US audiences.

And I'll go out on a limb here & suggest that as far as I'm aware, The Principality of Monaco (which is a sovereign entity independent from France or Italy) was never had a civil war (although it has been invaded by foreign powers).

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9 minutes ago, limey said:

Ken Burns typically concentrates on subjects closer to American history, but I'm sure PBS has produced documentaries that covered elements of what was a complex story on the Spanish civil war - 

I have never found any satisfactory material on the subject. It seems that practically everybody in the USA sees the 1936-39 War through the eyes of Hemingway, who was no historian.

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15 minutes ago, Palmerin said:

I have never found any satisfactory material on the subject. It seems that practically everybody in the USA sees the 1936-39 War through the eyes of Hemingway, who was no historian.

Do you mean George Orwell? :huh: Are you referring to Homage to Catalonia?

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1 minute ago, Gershwin fan said:

Do you mean George Orwell? :huh: Are you referring to Homage to Catalonia?

Orwell is the exception; every other so-called reporter had an ax to grind.

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I googled "Spanish civil war on PBS" and got lots of hits. None referenced programs as comprehensive as some 10 part Ken Burns production. I would say more, but it appears this site is experiencing its daily Asian invasion, so I will flee.

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13 minutes ago, Palmerin said:

I have never found any satisfactory material on the subject. It seems that practically everybody in the USA sees the 1936-39 War through the eyes of Hemingway, who was no historian.

Well, Hemingway is probably the most likely reference that people who didn't have relatives who were involved in the conflict, are going to come across. Aside from being a complex story to fully tell, it had no official USA participation & telling it would involve subjects touchy to both the USA & to current foreign allies and their stances at the time.

I do agree that it's a subject that deserves coverage in depth.

2 minutes ago, Thenryb said:

it appears this site is experiencing its daily Asian invasion, so I will flee

I usually enjoy most things Asian, but I could do without that...

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