Princess of Tap

To Sir Sidney With Love

28 posts in this topic

On 2/20/2018 at 12:51 AM, jakeem said:
...Sir Sidney Poitier (born on February 20, 1927), the American-born, Bahamian-bred film great who observes his 91st birthday today. He and Kirk Douglas are the only living actors on the American Film Institute's 1999 list of the top 50 greatest screen legends of all time. Douglas was the No. 17 male; Poitier was ranked at No. 22. Sophia Loren is the only living actress on the list (she was No. 21 in the category of Top 25 Female Legends).
 
Related image
 
He has been nominated for Academy Awards twice and won once. His recognized roles and movies were as follows (Oscar win is in bold): 
  • Noah Cullen in "The Defiant Ones" (1958). Best Actor.
  • Homer Smith in "Lilies of the Field" (1964). Best Actor.
Poitier made his screen debut in Joseph L. Mankiewicz's 1950 drama "No Way Out," which starred Richard Widmark and Linda Darnell. Widmark played wounded robbery suspect Ray Biddle, a virulent racist who continually baited Dr. Luther Brooks (Poitier) -- the black physician attending a hospital's prison ward. Forty-two years later, when Poitier was honored with the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award, Widmark recalled that his character "had to say and do just vicious things" to the doctor played by Poitier. "So practically after every take, I'd run up to him and I'd apologize," he said. "And I'd try to assure him, 'Sid, it's just the character talking, not me.' Well, he was very understanding and we became good friends." They later co-starred in the films "The Long Ships" (1963) and "The Bedford Incident" (1965).
 
Image result for sidney poitier no way out
 
Based on the 1954 novel by Evan Hunter, "The Blackboard Jungle" starred Glenn Ford as a schoolteacher trying to cope with a particularly rowdy group of inner city students. Among them were characters played by Poitier, Vic Morrow (in his film debut), future filmmaker Paul Mazursky and Jamie Farr. The gritty drama was adapted and directed by Richard Brooks. The song "Rock Around the Clock" by Bill Haley and the Comets was used in the opening credits. It became a rock 'n' roll anthem for the 1950s generation. 
 
Related image
 
In 1958, Tony Curtis and Poitier starred in "The Defiant Ones," Stanley Kramer's drama about escaped convicts -- one white and one black. The film received nine Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture and Best Director. It also earned Best Actor nominations for its two stars, making Poitier the first black performer to be honored in that category.
 
Related image
 
Ask Poitier about his least favorite film, and the answer is likely to be Otto Preminger's 1959 screen version of "Porgy and Bess." The musical, which also starred Dorothy Dandridge, Sammy Davis, Jr., Pearl Bailey, Brock Peters and Diahann Carroll, featured great music by composer George Gershwin. But Poitier and many of the other actors were concerned about negative black stereotypes during the era of the civil rights movement. "Porgy and Bess" won the Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture -- Musical or Comedy. Neither Poitier nor Dandridge did their own singing in the title roles, but they both received Golden Globe nominations. The film also won an Academy Award for Best Scoring of a Musical Picture (André Previn and Ken Darby). In addition, it was nominated for Best Color Cinematography (Leon Shamroy), Best Color Costume Design (Irene Sharaff) and Best Sound (Gordon Sawyer and Fred Hynes). The film has been seldom seen through the years because of contractual reasons. 
 
Image result for sidney poitier in porgy and bess
 

The 1960 Korean War drama "All the Young Men" -- directed by Hall Bartlett ("Zero Hour!") -- starred Alan Ladd, Poitier, James Darren. and Mort Sahl. The film reflected the newly desegregated military units of the time.The careers of Ladd and Poitier were about to go in different directions. Ladd only made four more pictures -- the last was "The Carpetbaggers," released three months after his death in January 1964. Meanwhile, Poitier was on the verge of becoming a screen superstar. 

All-the-Young-Men-1960-2.jpg
 
Martin Ritt's 1961 film "Paris Blues" was a tale of friendship, music and romance in The City of Light. Poitier and Paul Newman played jazz musicians and American expatriates who had memorable experiences with two American schoolteachers (Carroll and Joanne Woodward). Poitier and Carroll had been in love since the filming of "Porgy and Bess," although they were married to others. Newman and Woodward had been married since 1958.
 
Image result for sidney poitier paul newman paris blues
 
"A Raisin in the Sun" was a 1961 film adaptation of Lorraine Hansberry's acclaimed 1959 stage play. Directed by Daniel Petrie ("The Betsy," "Fort Apache the Bronx"), the drama returned Poitier and Claudia McNeil to the Tony Award-nominated roles they created on Broadway.The story revolved around the Youngers, a Chicago family hoping for a brighter future, thanks to matriarch Mama Lena (McNeil) and her $10,000 insurance check. The film, which also starred Ruby Dee, Diana Sands, Stephen Perry, Ivan Dixon, Louis Gossett, Jr. (pictured below with Poitier and Dee), Roy E. Glenn, Sr., Joel Fluellen and John Fiedler, was adapted by Hansberry from her play.
 
Image result for sidney poitier lou gossett a raisin in the sun
 
Poitier starred in the acclaimed 1963 comedy/drama "Lilies of the Field," in which he played a handyman named Homer Smith who became a godsend to a group of immigrant nuns in the Arizona desert. He is persuaded by the willful Mother Superior (Lilia Skala) to build a chapel for the townspeople. In one of the movie's best scenes (pictured below), Smith and the head nun iwage a duel of Bible passages to determine what should happen. Produced and directed by Ralph Nelson (who would collaborate with Poitier again), the production was adapted by James Poe from the 1962 novel by William Edmund Barrett. The film received Academy Award nominations for Best Picture, Best Actor (Poitier), Best Supporting Actress (Skalia), Best Adapted Screenplay (Poe) and Best Black-and-White Cinematography (Ernest Haller).
 
Image result for sidney poitier the kennedy center honors 1995
 
At the 36th Academy Awards ceremony on April 13, 1964, Poitier made history by becoming the first African-American actor to win a competitive Oscar. He was presented the award by actress Anne Bancroft, who would later co-star with Poitier in "The Slender Thread" (1965).
 
 
In the 1964 adventure film "The Long Ships," Poitier (pictured with the Italian actress Rosanna Schiaffino ) played a Moorish ruler obsessed with finding the location of a legendary golden bell. He coerced the members of a Viking crew (led by a character played by Widmark). The film was directed by Jack Cardiff, the cinematographer for the 1958 hit "The Vikings."
 
Image result for sidney poitier rosanna schiaffino the long shios
 
In the 1965 drama "A Patch of Blue," Poitier played a Good Samaritan who made a difference in the life of a sheltered blind girl (Elizabeth Hartman). Shelley Winter won the second of her two Best Supporting Actress Oscars for her performance as the girl's domineering mother.Written and directed by the British filmmaker Guy Green ("The Mark"), the drama earned four other Oscar nominations: Best Actress (Hartman), Best Black-and-White Cinematography (Robert Burks), Best Black-and-White Art Direction-Set Decoration (George W. Davis, Urie McCleary, Henry Grace and Charles S. Thompson) and Best Music Score (Jerry Goldsmith). Green, who died in 2005 at the age of 91, adapted the film from the novel "Be Ready with Bells and Drums" by Australian author Elizabeth Kata. He considered the film to be his greatest accomplishment.
 
Related image
 
Poitier played an ex-Buffalo Soldier and James Garner an ex-scout in the 1966 Western "Duel at Diablo," which was directed by Nelson. The characters find themselves drawn into a brewing conflict in Utah between U.S. cavalrymen and hostile Apaches. Also starring in the film: Bibi Andersson, Dennis Weaver, Bill Travers and John Hoyt. Nelson appeared as a U.S. Army colonel named Foster under the name Alf Elson. The film was based on the 1957 novel "Apache Rising" by Marvin H. Albert.
 
Image result for sidney poitier duel at diablo
 
Poitier was the No. 1 box-office star for 1967 and headlined three hit films -- "To Sir, with Love," "In the Heat of the Night" and "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner." Somehow, he didn't receive an Academy Award nomination for any of the films. The 40th annual Oscars ceremony was delayed two days -- to April 10, 1968 -- in the aftermath of the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. So Poitier was on hand to announce that his "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" co-star Katharine Hepburn had won the award for Best Actress (it was accepted by her friend George Cukor). Also, Poitier was there to congratulate his "In the Heat of the Night" co-star Rod Steiger on his Best Actor win. The two actors returned to the stage when "In the Heat of the Night" was named Best Picture.
 
 
"The Lost Man" (1969) was a remake of "Odd Man Out," Sir Carol Reed's 1947 British drama about a robbery in Northern Ireland that goes awry for a nationalist Irish group leader (James Mason). That film was based on the 1946 novel by British actor F.L. Green. It served as the source material for the heist film that starred Poitier and the Canadian actress Joanna Shimkus. The couple has been together ever since.
 
Image result for sidney poitier joanna shimkus the lost man
 
In 1969, Poitier joined forces with Newman, Steve McQueen and Barbra Streisand to create the production company First Artists. The joint enterprise, which later added Dustin Hoffman, operated until 1980. Among the films released by the partners: Poitier: "A Warm December" (1973), "Uptown Saturday Night" (1974), "Let's Do It Again" (1975), "A Piece of the Action" (1977); Newman: "Pocket Money" (1972), "The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean" (1972), "The Drowning Pool" (1975); McQueen: "The Getaway" (1972), "An Enemy of the People" (1978), "Tom Horn" (1980); Streisand: "Up the Sandbox" (1972), "A Star Is Born" (1976), "The Main Event" (1979); Hoffman: "Straight Time" (1978), "Agatha" (1979).
a3bc44b715e80c0069ec07be6587395d.jpg
 
On March 12, 1992, Poitier became the first African-American actor to receive the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award. He was presented the honor by producer George Stevens, Jr. at a star-studded ceremony.
 
Image result for sidney poitier afi life achievement award
 
In December 1995, Poitier was among the performers recognized at the annual Kennedy Center Honors in Washington, D.C. Also named as honorees: the dance master Jacques d'Amboise, the opera star Marilyn Horne, the blues great B.B. King, and the playwright and screenwriter Neil Simon. During the tribute to Poitier, his longtime friend Newman recalled their collaboration on "Paris Blues."
 
 
At the 74th Academy Awards ceremony on March 24, 2002, Poitier received an honorary Oscar "in recognition of his remarkable accomplishments as an artist and as a human being." The presentation was made by Denzel Washington and producer Walter Mirisch. As it turned out, Washington and Halle Berry won Academy Awards for lead performances later that night.
 
Image result for poitier, denzel washington and halle berry
 
On August 12, 2009, President Obama presented Poitier with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, one of the nation's highest civilian honors. Obama said the actor and director "not only entertained, but enlightened -- shifting attitudes, broadening hearts, revealing the power of the silver screen to bring us closer together."
 
Related image
 
At the 2017 TCM Classic Film Festival in April, Poitier was reunited with several collaborators after a 50th anniversary screening of "In the Heat of the Night." Pictured from left to right: producer Mirisch, director Norman Jewison, Poitier, actress Lee Grant and composer Quincy Jones.
 
C86i-7WVwAAelOz.jpg
 
 

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

 Sidney Poitier is truly an American treasure-- not just a great actor but someone who transformed Hollywood and brought it into reality.

I see Sidney as a link between old Hollywood and new Hollywood. He was the first black actor in Hollywood who was allowed to be a man on screen and to act head to toe equal with white movie stars--

The legendary greats like Clark Gable, Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy, along with

 The current box office stars of his day, like Tony Curtis, Richard Widmark, Paul Newman, Rod Steiger and Rock Hudson.

Sidney was the biggest precipitant in making today's Hollywood happen.

For that reason Sidney means so many things to so many different people.

My favorite Sidney Poitier movie is Guess Who's Coming To Dinner? because it has my two other very favorite Hollywood stars in it and it's always a thrill when three legendary actors come together.

I also love every movie that Sidney made with Richard Widmark. Off camera they were close friends and very supportive of each other in their respective careers.

But Sidney's tour de force is and will always be In the Heat of the Night--  "They Call Me Mr. Tibbs."

So Sidney is one of my favorite actors because he is a great actor, because he really EARNED his place in Hollywood and because he's so good-looking.

 

Happy  Birthday,  Sir Sidney!

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Sidney Poitier was the first black American man to receive the Oscar for Best Actor in 1964.

Ironically today, at 91 years of age, he is the oldest living recipient of the Academy Award for Best Actor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 In 1969,  four top box office American movie stars formed a production company called First Artists to produce their movies.

The four cinema artists were: Paul Newman, Sidney Poitier, Steve McQueen and Barbra Streisand. Later they were joined by actor Dustin Hoffman.

 

Some of the popular movies that each star produced were:

 

Uptown Saturday Night-- Poitier

The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean-- Newman

A Star is Born-- Streisand

The Getaway - - McQueen

Agatha - - Hoffman

 

 The selection of the name First Artists was a  salute to the first  production company/ movie studio  formed by cinema artists:  United Artists. UA  was formed by the pioneers of the movie industry for their Film Production in 1919.

The United Artists were: Mary Pickford, Charlie Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks and DW Griffith.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sidney is great.  I love that in 1950 he's playing a doctor and four years later he's playing a high school student.  My favorite scene in any Poitier movie is where he slaps back Larry Gates' character in THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT.  That takes b***s!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ChristineHoard said:

Sidney is great.  I love that in 1950 he's playing a doctor and four years later he's playing a high school student.  My favorite scene in any Poitier movie is where he slaps back Larry Gates' character in THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT.  That takes b***s!

My favorite scene is at the end of "To Sir, with Love" (1967) when Poitier's schoolteacher character, Mr. Thackeray, realizes he's not going to become an engineer. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whew,  for a minute there I thought this was going to be another obituary/tribute thread... :(

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow thanks for that great run down of Poitier's work, Princess.

Sir Poitier is a favorite in this household - what an incredible body of work! One of my favorites not mentioned is 1962's PRESSURE POINT where Sidney plays a psychiatrist assisting a racist prison inmate. Like many of his roles, he rises against racism with dignity.

Also another favorite, GUESS WHOS COMING TO DINNER? which had a huge impact on people my age. We are the generation who were brought up by parents with one narrow view of black/white relationships and revolutionized society in favor of multi hued acceptance.
The movie is pretty much obsolete for young adults these days, mostly only notable for the great performances and insight on the Civil Rights cultural revolution of the day. Movies are a great window showing typical dynamics of how people interacted with each other historically, before our time.

And I cannot recommend enough his latest book THE MEASURE OF A MAN. It is one of the most fascinating and enlightening books in my library-I keep two copies-one to keep, one to loan out. The stories of his childhood in the wilds of the islands, coming to Miami, then NY, dealing with prejudice in America, his profession- all very inspirational.

Thank you Sir Sidney, for sharing your life, your talent with us. We are all so much richer for it. Edited by TikiSoo
brainless error
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/21/2018 at 7:23 AM, Princess of Tap said:

 Sidney Poitier was the first American black man to win the Academy Award.

And he deserved it -- but Albert Finney deserved it more that year.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Swithin said:

And he deserved it -- but Albert Finney deserved it more that year.

 

Swith-- I might have said the same thing about Gérard Depardieu if he had been up for Cyrano de Bergerac. LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess that means it's best to cover your cornflakes whenever Swithin comes around. :D  

Anyway, Sidney's been a longtime favorite for both me AND my wife, who has no hesitation in mentioning that when she was younger( and still I bet) had a GYNORMOUS crush on him. ;) 

I suppose one of my favorite scenes in any Sidney movie is his teaching English to the sisters in LILIES OF THE FIELD . ;)  "I  stands  up." :D

My favorite overall performance would be RAISIN IN THE SUN.

Sepiatone

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also love the end of "Sneakers" (1992) when the characters played by Robert Redford and Poitier -- and other members of their team of security experts -- squeeze favors from an NSA officer (James Earl Jones) in exchange for a mysterious box.

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/21/2018 at 7:23 AM, Princess of Tap said:

 Sidney Poitier was the first American black man to win the Academy Award.

whatta bout that special oscar awarded to james baskett?

he doan count?

that's ingrid bergman presenting baskett with his special oscar

(to be completely forgotten because of modern political correctness)

(it never happened!)

Related image

:lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now now, Nipster. Don't go gettin' your little Rightie-tighties in a twist here, dude.

Ya see, I believe the earlier point being made here, and by inclusion of the word "win" as a matter of fact, was that Sidney was the first American black man to win a COMPETITIVE Oscar.

(...and sooooo, maybe next time you'll read the complete sentence in someone's posting before you decide to once again go off on one of your little "woe be this politically correct world we live in today" rants)

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, NipkowDisc said:

whatta bout that special oscar awarded to james baskett?

he doan count?

that's ingrid bergman presenting baskett with his special oscar

(to be completely forgotten because of modern political correctness)

(it never happened!)

Related image

:lol:

Nippy-- Thanks for your informative photo.

Honorary Oscars are definitely a great achievement. Fred Astaire received one too in 1950, presented to him by Ginger Rogers for his unique artistry  and contribution to the musical motion picture.

It's wonderful to see that you are honoring American black achievement during this February month of  American black history.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Nippy-- Thanks for your informative photo.

Honorary Oscars are definitely a great achievement. Fred Astaire received one too in 1950, presented to him by Ginger Rogers for his unique artistry  and contribution to the musical motion picture.

It's wonderful to see that you are honoring American black achievement during this February month of  American black history.

Yeah! Ya know, after the Nipster just the other day expressed his regrets about goin' off half-cocked about this recent Black Panther movie, and now THIS, who knows, maybe one soon we'll see him marching in one of those Black Lives Matter rallies TOO!!!

(...okay okay...maybe not) LOL

;)

  • Haha 1
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎2‎/‎22‎/‎2018 at 9:42 AM, Swithin said:

And he deserved it -- but Albert Finney deserved it more that year.

 

Disagree. I never felt the love for TOM JONES and while Finney was good in it, it's not the kind of performance I would have given him an Oscar for.

If anyone was going to beat Sidney that year, my choice would have been Paul Newman for HUD. Now there is a performance that I can never get enough.

But I always have had a soft spot for Sidney so I can't really argue against his winning Best Actor that year. My personal favorite performance of his has always been in GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER, where he held his own against two legends, Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Disagree. I never felt the love for TOM JONES and while Finney was good in it, it's not the kind of performance I would have given him an Oscar for.

If anyone was going to beat Sidney that year, my choice would have been Paul Newman for HUD. Now there is a performance that I can never get enough.

But I always have had a soft spot for Sidney so I can't really argue against his winning Best Actor that year. My personal favorite performance of his has always been in GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER, where he held his own against two legends, Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn.

I like Sidney Poitier but have never really felt there is much variety in his characterizations. I love Albert Finney in Tom Jones (love the whole movie). Finney went from playing roles similar to the working class Mancunian that he was (Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, etc.), to playing a rather charming 18th Century aristocratic rake. In fact, it was nice to see all those angry young working class lads (John Osborne, Tony Richardson) converge on Henry Fielding's classic and turn it into one of the great British movies.  

Finney did win the New York Film Critics Best Actor Award for Tom Jones.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Disagree. I never felt the love for TOM JONES and while Finney was good in it, it's not the kind of performance I would have given him an Oscar for.

If anyone was going to beat Sidney that year, my choice would have been Paul Newman for HUD. Now there is a performance that I can never get enough.

But I always have had a soft spot for Sidney so I can't really argue against his winning Best Actor that year. My personal favorite performance of his has always been in GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER, where he held his own against two legends, Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn.

Beth--

I feel the same way about Guess Who's Coming to Dinner? You can't deny the greatness of Tracy and Hepburn, yet  at the same time I think this was really Poitier's movie.

It was as if Sidney's acting career as a non -stereotypical black man and his characterization of a strong professional American black man all melded together to reach a breakout point of a kind of humanity that a black actor had never been allowed to experience on the screen in a Hollywood movie before.

In the scene with his father, played by Roy Glenn Sr., Poitier's summation speech said it it all--

" You think of yourself as a black man-- I think of  myself as a man. "

I had to go back to the theater and see the movie again, a second time -- because I was so overwhelmed the first time with the sad climax of Tracy and Hepburn's on-screen career.

The second time that I saw it I truly could see how Poitier dominated the movie and how the movie was designed to Capstone the success of his unique non-stereotypical Hollywood career, as a black actor, along with the exit of the old Hollywood guard.

This film truly marked the end of an era and the beginning of a new one.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Overall star rating (***1/2out of 4) & it's song was snubbed   of an AMPAS nominaton all the way! Winner that yr "Talk to the Animals" from "Dr. Dolittle"

 

Plus, he was vioted hby NATO as the no. 1 annual $Box-0ffice Champion for 1968   WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO HIM THOUGH? I KNOW HE'S WAY UP THERE AT AGE 91, BUT SO IOS HARRY BELAONTE?

 

 

"Essential *Poitier"(only 4 allowed like tcm "Guest Programmers")

1st choice "In the Heat of the Night" (l967) swept 5Academy Aards him was not or leading actor that year, or for "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" & *Steiger handedly won

2nd "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" (NOTE: in the superb 1986/87 *"Spencer Tracy: Legacy" he was amonmg a myriad of interviews & said *Sencewas very ill, but when he did show up, he was ion force as an actor  unquote

3rd pick "The Defiant 0nes" (l958-UA) (many insist that both he & Curtis delivered the performances of their lives in this classic)

& 4th GP selection would be "Raisin' In the Sun" (l96l-UA) (as Maltin  saysrguably his finest performance!)

(ALSO-RAN:1958's ultra tough by Budd Schulberg'_(*"0n the Waterfront" & more) account & on the docks again. Heavy drama  betweenhe close friendship of him & Cassavettes. But it's Jack warden whom steals the show as the heavy) & I've always liked his 1963 *Oscar winning "Liies of the Field" (***-UA), but it was more quaint, then many of his others?  He actually upset *Newman in & as "Hud" for that "Golen Boy" that *Oscar year

THANK YOU

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Nippy-- Thanks for your informative photo.

Honorary Oscars are definitely a great achievement. Fred Astaire received one too in 1950, presented to him by Ginger Rogers for his unique artistry  and contribution to the musical motion picture.

It's wonderful to see that you are honoring American black achievement during this February month of  American black history.

No matter how long this moviebuff lives, I will always find it truly despicable that Baskett was only given a special statue vs him being up for s. actor instead??? Another bit of hypocrisy is that HOLLYWOOD still feel it ok to vote "Song of the South"(l947)- A strong**1/2) Best song though  GO FIGURE?  Now even the all-time & legendary likes of what is officially thee highest grossing motion picture ever made 1939's *"GWTW" is starting top suffer the same fate?  Even the glorious ""Tampa Theatre" down here publicly commented it now refuses to EVER book *Selznick's epic!? Topper is they & many of us our actually listening to college punks (NOTE: above $$$ & *"GWTW" figure is first due to the list adjusted for inflation)

& the PC left to begin with, who haven't even lived, or I dare say haven't even seen these heavyweights   1at saw the *:GONE WUTH THE WIND" item a cxopuple weeks ago & now "Farenheit 451" is also on the ever growing listy? NEXT BURNING BOOKS!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

 

In the scene with his father, played by Roy Glenn Sr., Poitier's summation speech said it it all--

" You think of yourself as a black man-- I think of  myself as a man. "

 

Actually, if you remember, Sidney said "Colored man."

And it is one of my favorite moments from the movie.

Sepiatone

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of my favorite actors, he is one of the best at playing quiet strength and dignity. 

My top favorites of his films are 

To Sir With Love-he was clever and understanding in getting through to his rowdy group of British students, he has a great scene when he finally explodes in anger at them. I love the supporting cast and the music too in this one (even though Poitier is not much of a dancer!)

A Patch Of Blue-he is the big hearted guy who helps an abused blind girl. Elizabeth Hartman is heartbreaking as the girl and Shelley Winters is hateful as the racist prostitute mother. Poitier's final scene when Hartman is leaving is very poignant.

No Way Out- Poitier is a tower of strength as a proud doctor faced with snarling racist Richard Widmark. People today would be shocked that something so raw and brutal could be made in 1950.

 

One film not mentioned yet is Shoot To Kill (1988), it may just be an 1980s action adventure film but it is highly entertaining. Poitier is an FBI agent who teams up with a mountain man (Tom Berenger) who guides Poitier into the mountains to track down a crazed killer/thief who has kidnapped Berenger's lover (Kirstie Alley). This was Poitier's first acting job in ten years and he hasn't aged at all, he still has that quiet charisma and has good chemistry with Berenger. The film has great scenery and some stunning stunt work. I won't spoil who plays the villain because he is among several actors who previously played bad guys before and it comes as a surprise in the middle of the film. Look for this one.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us