Bostonjazz

Pregnancy in classic movies

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I tried to Google this but couldn't find an answer. Here goes - in classic movies anytime a woman is expecting it goes from her saying she's expecting then it jumps to either the hospital or her showing a small baby. So my question is when was the first time they actually showed someone pregnant on film?

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Actually Lucille Ball broke the pregnancy taboo more than 60 years ago.. She was forbidden to use the word.

Did got some hate mail over the subject.

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Unforgettable scene in "Lucy Goes To The Hospital" (1953)

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Father's Little Dividend, a sequel to Father of the Bride revolves around pregnancy and having a baby. It was considered controversial for the 1950's.

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18 minutes ago, Diana101 said:

Father's Little Dividend, a sequel to Father of the Bride revolves around pregnancy and having a baby. It was considered controversial for the 1950's.

I love that sequel to Father of the Bride. The first movie was based on a book by Edward Streeter and follows the book pretty closely. But the second one has a little more originality with a lot of those Vincente Minnelli touches.

My favorite scene is where Spencer Tracy has to convince cab driver--Dabbs Greer over the phone-- to tell him where he has taken Elizabeth Taylor, as she has left her husband. Tracy uses the phrase "in a family way" to convince the cab driver to give him the information-- I don't think the words pregnant or pregnancy are ever used in the movie.

My favorite line in this movie follows the previous action above when Don Taylor complains to Tracy about how childish his daughter is: that she can't just run away from home every time they have a marital argument.

Then Tracy looks at Taylor with that deadpan he's got and says: " Well, what do you want me to do? Pack up and move?"

It's a charming and terrific little sequel from 1951.

However, Lucy had Desi jr in 1953 and they still didn't use the word pregnant; but they used the word in Spanish, encinta, which suited propriety and a Hispanic father Desi/ Ricky.

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19 minutes ago, hamradio said:

Poster is a bit funny...why are there separate showing for women and men?:blink::lol:

Possibly, the theater management were concerned about people being startled beyond description after the lights dimmed... ;)

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The Great Lie from 1941 was on last night, in which Bette Davis whisks Mary Astor off to Arizona to have a baby in secret, and there are scenes where Astor is seen in a very large overcoat that's supposed to imply pregnancy

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Don't know if it was the first film to use the word, but Arlene Francis dropped the phrase "We're Pregnant!" just before the opening credits of the 1963 film.The Thrill of It All 

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When I was about 10 years old I saw Kitty Foyle,  a 1940 movie that gave Ginger Rogers her Oscar.

 It seemed to me like she danced all night with Dennis Morgan and then a few months later she went to the doctor's office and the nurse called her Mrs. Foyle.  Then in the next scene she is sweating a lot and says she's going to name it after her  dad . I think she's about to give birth,  but something happens to the baby and you never see it. 

At 10 this whole thing had me a bit confused, but I figured out that Dennis Morgan was a no-good son-of-a-gun--she should just go on and forget about him. 

So the moral of the story is don't dance all night with Dennis Morgan because it may end up badly for you. LOL

 

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Your post makes me think of The Miracle of Morgan's Creek, in which Betty Hutton seems to have a night consisting mostly of dancing with soldiers, and one of them says something about getting married, and she screams the word "MARRIED!!??", and it echoes like a hundred times, and then poof! she's pregnant. It was apparently very important to the filmmakers and perhaps the censors that no sex in this film took place outside of marriage.

Like any **** soldier on his final night of leave was going to waste valuable minutes or hours getting married to a girl he never intends to see again ....

Edit: Oops, should have known that word wouldn't be allowed. Okay, think "thorny" and take away the "t".

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Thanks for that guess for the first time "pregnant" was used instead of "expecting". Amazing something that's been going on since the dawn of time would be so forbidden.

Before LUCY, pregnant women were depicted (if at all) by wearing loose clothing, never with any belly showing.

A far cry from all the tight t-shirts stretched to the limit I see walking around the Mall these days.
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Most old movies feature the female who's supposed to be pregnant with a belly flat as a washboard, including Mary Astor in The Great Lie. I think the earliest movie in which I saw an actress wear maternity clothes was Leave Her to Heaven in 1945. Loretta Young also donned maternity clothes for It Happens Every Thursday, released c. 1953.

BLU

 

 

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26 minutes ago, darkblue said:

Filth. Pure filth.

Yep that's the view back then, it was one of the most taboo subjects in movies.  If you don't think people were this uptight, one only need to see the "Expecting mothers" scene in the "Bluebird" (1940). 

Silly and comical by today's standards.

The Unborn:lol:

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11 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

When I was about 10 years old I saw Kitty Foyle,  a 1940 movie that gave Ginger Rogers her Oscar.

 It seemed to me like she danced all night with Dennis Morgan and then a few months later she went to the doctor's office and the nurse called her Mrs. Foyle.  Then in the next scene she is sweating a lot and says she's going to name it after her  dad . I think she's about to give birth,  but something happens to the baby and you never see it. 

At 10 this whole thing had me a bit confused, but I figured out that Dennis Morgan was a no-good son-of-a-gun--she should just go on and forget about him. 

So the moral of the story is don't dance all night with Dennis Morgan because it may end up badly for you. LOL

 

I've been fixed. Send Dennis Morgan my way anytime!

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The earliest movie I can think of that depicted the duration of a woman's pregnancy in a physically realistic way was Rosemary's Baby.  Mia Farrow even mentions in her interview on the Criterion DVD that she was even fitted with different sized boobs throughout the film!

As for the use of the word "pregnant" in a Hollywood film, the earliest I can think of is All About Eve.  When Margo arrives late for Miss Caswell's audition and learns that her understudy stepped in, she states:

"I consider it highly unnatural to allow a girl in an advanced state of pregnancy ..."

To which Addison replies:

"I refer to your new and unpregnant understudy, Eve Harrington."

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Life Begins (1932) is set in a maternity hospital.  Glenda Farrell doesn't want her baby.

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Hmmmm...can't remember for sure, but I don't think the word "pregnant" is used in the film To Each His Own (1946) and in which Olivia de Havilland would win her first Best Actress Oscar for playing an unwed mother.

(...always loved that movie...although perhaps being adopted as a infant, I might have had an extra little affinity for the tale because of it)

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Been years since I've seen it, so don't remember if the word was used or even if much was done to give the appearance of pregnancy in THE FIRST TIME( '52) with Bob Cummings and Barbara Hale.    But it's recalled that when my EX saw it many moons ago, she quipped, "With a name like THAT( referring to Bob) you'd figure he'd have a THOUSAND kids!"

Sepiatone

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4 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Been years since I've seen it, so don't remember if the word was used or even if much was done to give the appearance of pregnancy in THE FIRST TIME( '52) with Bob Cummings and Barbara Hale.    But it's recalled that when my EX saw it many moons ago, she quipped, "With a name like THAT( referring to Bob) you'd figure he'd have a THOUSAND kids!"

Sepiatone

LOL

Better watch such talk here, Sepia.

I mean, you know how the mods are around here doncha, and ya never know.

Evidently it doesn't take much anymore for 'em to somehow view a post as "inappropriate" when we even subtly suggest such stuff as this.

(...just ask speedy and Lorna) ;)

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I know the word "pregnant" was used in Ten North Frederick, but I cannot imagine that was the first time.

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Has everyone forgotten GONE WITH THE WIND  (1939)?

there is a quite REALISTIC pregnancy (Melanie's) going on in this movie, as well as at the end of the film, when Melanie DIES from trying to have a second baby with Ashley.

Scarlett is tossed down a staircase with her SECOND PREGNANCY in the film, nearly dying (in the book, she had 3 children---in the movie, only one, the adorable Bonnie Lee Butler.)

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Ditto: GRAPES OF WRATH -- the young character Rosasharon is pregnant for a while in this film.

in the "pre-code" film NIGHT NURSE (1931), Barbara Stanwyck plays a nurse working on a maternity ward, and mothers are shown breast-feeding their new infants.

The entire plot of the film FULL OF LIFE (1956) revolves about Judy Holliday's pregnancy (with the baby being born at the climax of the film.) This film is also a ground-breaker because Judy and her film husband, Richard Conte are shown in a double bed-together.

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Not that this is pregnancy in the movies...

But in I Love Lucy, Lucy and Ricky's beds were pushed together for the first two seasons.  After the birth of Little Ricky near the end of the second season, CBS demanded that the two beds be separated as to diminish the suggestion of a sexual relationship between Lucy and Ricky.  Um, they just had a baby! And the American public witnessed not only Lucy's entire pregnancy, but Lucy telling both Ethel and Ricky that she was having a baby! Plus, Lucy and Ricky have been married for at least ten years at the start of the series and Ricky is Latin!

Just to even get the pregnancy episodes approved by CBS, Desi Arnaz arranged for a rabbi, minister and priest to review the scripts for any objectionable content.  They didn't find any, and even said, "what's wrong with a married woman having a baby?" 

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19 hours ago, SansFin said:

two men kissing and the wife becoming pregnant?

That's not how you get pregnant.  :D

 

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