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jaragon

Gay Theme Biofilms

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There have been many films bases on the lives of famous GLTB figures- Oscar Wilder, Alan Turin which historical gay figure do you think would make a good subject for a movie?

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3 hours ago, jaragon said:

There have been many films bases on the lives of famous GLTB figures- Oscar Wilder, Alan Turin which historical gay figure do you think would make a good subject for a movie?

I'd love to see a good (Scratch that...a great one or don't bother) movie about Montgomery Clift. There's still some argument about Clift's exact sexual orientation, but Elizabeth Taylor described him as gay and she ought to have known. He was obviously conflicted but that could make for a great film. 

James Baldwin too. I was late getting to his body of work but am amazed at how honest and specific he was able to be in an era that didn't really want to hear it. 

Good topic.

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Benjamin Britten doesn't sound like he was a very nice guy and he had that complicated relationship with teenage boys but you got all that great music- visually it could be something to see and hear

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19 hours ago, jaragon said:

Benjamin Britten doesn't sound like he was a very nice guy and he had that complicated relationship with teenage boys but you got all that great music- visually it could be something to see and hear

Yes, and it's a world you don't usually see explored in films.

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There is a new Hans Christian Andersen musical bio film in the works- I wonder how gay he is going to be in that one?

 

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I've always suspected our only unmarried president, James Buchanan, was gay. His niece Harriet Lane took on some of the first lady duties in the White House. A film about their relationship could be quite interesting. 

It could even help create awareness so that one day we might have an openly gay U.S. president.

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From wiki:

The only president to remain a bachelor, Buchanan's personal life has attracted great historical interest. His biographer Jean Baker argues that Buchanan was asexual or celibate. Several writers have put forth arguments that he was homosexual, including sociologist James W. Loewen and authors Robert P. Watson and Shelley Ross.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Buchanan

_____

There was a male Alabama politician he had a close relationship with, named William Rufus King. So there is a lot that could be researched and put into script form.

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Abraham Lincoln was probably gay - see "The Intimate World of Abraham Lincoln" by C. A. Tripp - Joshua Fry Speed was probably the main man in his life - but we would never see a film biograghy which attempted to uncover the truth.

abraham-lincoln-joshua-speed.jpg

 

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7 hours ago, rayban said:

Abraham Lincoln was probably gay - see "The Intimate World of Abraham Lincoln" by C. A. Tripp - Joshua Fry Speed was probably the main man in his life - but we would never see a film biograghy which attempted to uncover the truth.

abraham-lincoln-joshua-speed.jpg

 

This could be interesting

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Don't know if Lincoln was gay.  Letters written among friends in those days were very florid and could be misinterpreted by modern readers.

No doubt in my mind that Buchanan was gay.  He might be an interesting topic for a movie.  Monty Clift could be a good biopic if done right.  So would Oscar Wilde.  I'd want the film makers to respect the person and present them honestly even with their imperfections.  

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17 hours ago, rayban said:

Abraham Lincoln was probably gay - see "The Intimate World of Abraham Lincoln" by C. A. Tripp - Joshua Fry Speed was probably the main man in his life - but we would never see a film biograghy which attempted to uncover the truth.

Apologists always say it was normal "for the times" for men to share a bed, even if it wasn't out of necessity, but is there really a man so straight he'd feel nothing in that situation, even if there were ultimately no sex involved? If only people could get beyond the idea that it would be an insult to his memory maybe we could get a fuller story. Considering what our current president has gotten away with, couldn't we allow Lincoln to be even a tiny bit of a horn*dog? It would maybe help us understand his married life better as well. I love him anyway, but it would be nice to know.

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6 hours ago, ChristineHoard said:

Don't know if Lincoln was gay.  Letters written among friends in those days were very florid and could be misinterpreted by modern readers.

No doubt in my mind that Buchanan was gay.  He might be an interesting topic for a movie.  Monty Clift could be a good biopic if done right.  So would Oscar Wilde.  I'd want the film makers to respect the person and present them honestly even with their imperfections.  

There have been at least three excellent films on Oscar Wilde.

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3 hours ago, DougieB said:

Apologists always say it was normal "for the times" for men to share a bed, even if it wasn't out of necessity, but is there really a man so straight he'd feel nothing in that situation, even if there were ultimately no sex involved? If only people could get beyond the idea that it would be an insult to his memory maybe we could get a fuller story. Considering what our current president has gotten away with, couldn't we allow Lincoln to be even a tiny bit of a horn*dog? It would maybe help us understand his married life better as well. I love him anyway, but it would be nice to know.

Lincoln's married life alone is the one leading factor to substantiate his homosexuality.

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There is no doubt that James M. Barrie was a closet pedophile - but all of the evidence that is available - especially "JM Barrie and The Lost Boys" by Andrew Birkin - will be avoided and mis-stated - because James M. Barrie wrote the beloved children's stage classic, "Peter Pan".

lg_e17389-peter-pan-jm-barrie-family.jpg

The Llewellyn-Davies family that became James M. Barrie's obsession.

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9 hours ago, ChristineHoard said:

Don't know if Lincoln was gay.  Letters written among friends in those days were very florid and could be misinterpreted by modern readers.

No doubt in my mind that Buchanan was gay.  He might be an interesting topic for a movie.  Monty Clift could be a good biopic if done right.  So would Oscar Wilde.  I'd want the film makers to respect the person and present them honestly even with their imperfections.  

Also I think that the characterization has to be true to the period. They can't revise the person's homosexuality to fit modern norms. A biopic about Buchanan could really explore his relationship with his niece, whom he officially adopted. What she knew, her part in covering up his sexuality, etc. As well as the relationship he undoubtedly had with William Rufus King. I would imagine the social circles knew about Buchanan's private life, so that could be another element, how his life is reflected through them that wag tongues. It could be a very interesting character study, sort of a political AGE OF INNOCENCE. That's how I'd write it.

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Modern eyes look at the past with different eyes- in the case of gay history a lot of that was hidden by the straight people in charge of writing the history books or in our case the filmmakers who invented female love interests from everyone from Alexander to Cole Porter.  And I think there is a real problem with portraying gay male sex on screen in movies aimed at the popular market- look at Alan Turing in "The Imitation Game" who was portrayed a asexual even is he is sentenced for gay behavior- which we never get to see?!

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29 minutes ago, jaragon said:

Modern eyes look at the past with different eyes- in the case of gay history a lot of that was hidden by the straight people in charge of writing the history books or in our case the filmmakers who invented female love interests from everyone from Alexander to Cole Porter.  And I think there is a real problem with portraying gay male sex on screen in movies aimed at the popular market- look at Alan Turing in "The Imitation Game" who was portrayed a asexual even is he is sentenced for gay behavior- which we never get to see?!

I think you need a little insight when you talk about Cole Porter's wife Linda. Linda Porter was the most influential person in Cole Porter's life. And she was also the most influential person in his professional career. Without Linda there would been no Cole Porter-- she gave him the support and the money he needed to reach his goal. Actually,  even  pushing  him to continue his music career when at times he'd given up.

Sometimes it's a good idea to remind people that there are all kinds of love in marriage and that the sexual part sometimes is not as important as other aspects to a marriage. 

Linda had been sexually abused in her first marriage and had no interest in sex anymore. She encouraged  and Lead his small group of male friends as a kind of a den mother, who was beloved and well respected by all.

Cole's private Entourage of highly respected artists included: Monty Woolley, Moss Hart and Noël Coward at the top of the list.

The real love between Cole Porter and Linda was not created by a movie or for a movie - - they had a different kind of marriage and it worked for them.

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2 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I think you need a little insight when you talk about Cole Porter's wife Linda. Linda Porter was the most influential person in Cole Porter's life. And she was also the most influential person in his professional career. Without Linda there would been no Cole Porter-- she gave him the support and the money he needed to reach his goal. Actually,  even  pushing  him to continue his music career when at times he'd given up.

Sometimes it's a good idea to remind people that there are all kinds of love in marriage and that the sexual part sometimes is not as important as other aspects to a marriage. 

Linda had been sexually abused in her first marriage and had no interest in sex anymore. She encouraged  and Lead his small group of male friends as a kind of a den mother, who was beloved and well respected by all.

Cole's private Entourage of highly respected artists included: Monty Woolley, Moss Hart and Noël Coward at the top of the list.

The real love between Cole Porter and Linda was not created by a movie or for a movie - - they had a different kind of marriage and it worked for them.

I was referring to general terms in which a gay figure is straightened out like Larry Hart in "Words and Music" who was given female love problems as opposed to his real problems with finding and keeping gay love.  Who knows what was really going on between Linda and Cole Porter- she was rich, older and perhaps found Cole amusing.  And yes you are right sex isn't essential for a long term relationship to work. My point was that some people have a real problem with gay sex on screen- specially if it's presented in a positive light- which is why so many are turned off by "Call Me By Your Name"

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1 minute ago, jaragon said:

I was referring to general terms in which a gay figure is straightened out like Larry Hart in "Words and Music" who was given female love problems as opposed to his real problems with finding and keeping gay love.  Who knows what was really going on between Linda and Cole Porter- she was rich, older and perhaps found Cole amusing.  And yes you are right sex isn't essential for a long term relationship to work. My point was that some people have a real problem with gay sex on screen- specially if it's presented in a positive light- which is why so many are turned off by "Call Me By Your Name"

Actually Larry Hart did have female problems. Unlike Cole Porter he could never quite be comfortable with his sexuality. His number one leading lady was actress -singer named Vivienne Segal. She was his star in Pal Joey with Gene Kelly on Broadway.

Larry grappled so much with his sexuality that at one point he asked Vivienne to marry him.  Of course, Larry didn't go through with it but that's just how conflicted he was about his life.

So if they do show Larry in the film as being publicly interested in  women, he must have been, at least one time.

And you know the rest about Larry,  how he ended up.

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2 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Actually Larry Hart did have female problems. Unlike Cole Porter he could never quite be comfortable with his sexuality. His number one leading lady was actress -singer named Vivienne Segal. She was his star in Pal Joey with Gene Kelly on Broadway.

Larry grappled so much with his sexuality that at one point he asked Vivienne to marry him.  Of course, Larry didn't go through with it but that's just how conflicted he was about his life.

So if they do show Larry in the film as being publicly interested in  women, he must have been, at least one time.

And you know the rest about Larry,  how he ended up.

Hart was a tragic figure- very talented but he thought he was physically unattractive .

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Just now, jaragon said:

Hart was a tragic figure- very talented but he thought he was physically unattractive .

I'm from Kansas and we had one of the greatest playwrights in the world, William Inge. He won the Pulitzer Prize.

If you haven't had a chance, you should see some of his films or read some of his plays. So much of his sexual frustration that you see in his work is channeled through to his female characters.

Natalie Wood's character in Splendor in the Grass would be a good example. William Inge won the Oscar for that screenplay and you can see him briefly as a minister in the movie.

He was a world famous playwright but he never could come to accept his sexuality, which unfortunately led to his suicide.

When you do get a chance to look at his work, you will notice that several of characters try to commit suicide or actually do commit suicide.

His life would make an interesting theatrical or literary work.

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1 minute ago, Princess of Tap said:

I'm from Kansas and we had one of the greatest playwrights in the world, William Inge. He won the Pulitzer Prize.

If you haven't had a chance, you should see some of his films or read some of his plays. So much of his sexual frustration that you see in his work is channeled through to his female characters.

Natalie Wood's character in Splendor in the Grass would be a good example. William Inge won the Oscar for that screenplay and you can see him briefly as a minister in the movie.

He was a world famous playwright but he never could come to accept his sexuality, which unfortunately led to his suicide.

When you do get a chance to look at his work, you will notice that several of characters try to commit suicide or actually do commit suicide.

His life would make an interesting theatrical or literary work.

You are right there is a lot of repressed sexuality in his work- another tragic figure

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William Inge's plays that were rejected on Broadway - "A Loss of Roses", "Naturnal Affection" and "Where's Daddy?" - are actually quite good.

Of his one-act plays, "Bus Riley's Back In Town" is a haunting piece of work.

For me, his greatest play is "Bus Stop".

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1 hour ago, rayban said:

William Inge's plays that were rejected on Broadway - "A Loss of Roses", "Naturnal Affection" and "Where's Daddy?" - are actually quite good.

Of his one-act plays, "Bus Riley's Back In Town" is a haunting piece of work.

For me, his greatest play is "Bus Stop".

Shirley Booth was the lead in Inge's Come Back Little Sheba on Broadway. And she won the Oscar for it as well.

They actually shot his film adaptation of Picnic in Hutchinson Kansas.

I think the Dark at the Top of the Stairs is Inge's most autobiographical work. It stars Robert Preston and Shirley Knight, who is also from Kansas.

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6 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Shirley Booth was the lead in Inge's Come Back Little Sheba on Broadway. And she won the Oscar for it as well.

They actually shot his film adaptation of Picnic in Hutchinson Kansas.

I think the Dark at the Top of the Stairs is Inge's most autobiographical work. It stars Robert Preston and Shirley Knight, who is also from Kansas.

I like the play, "The Dark At The Top Of The Stairs".

I'd love to see it on stage.

I appeared in a summer stock production of it in Bellport, Long Island.

I played Punky Givens - and I didn't have a word or line of dialogue.

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