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slaytonf

The flaw in High Noon (1952).

48 posts in this topic

Stephan55, that is a well-written essay regarding Muhammad Ali, but I beg to differ with you on some of the issues surrounding the decision not to serve in the US military.

Watching Cassius Clay beat Sonny Liston for the Heavyweight Championship on a live closed circuit broadcast at Manhattan's Rivoli Theater on February 25, 1964 was the beginning of my love affair with boxing and, briefly, with the new champion.

When he announced his conversion to the Nation of Islam and spoke on behalf of its' racist and separatist doctrine, I turned away from him but not the sport itself.  By the way, few remember that his original Muslim name was Cassius X, in the manner of his mentor and hero Malcolm X.  When Malcolm was excommunicated by Elijah Muhammad, Ali turned his back on Malcolm who was subsequently murdered.  Some say that Louis Farrakhan was one of the killers. 

Muhammad Ali had an IQ of 78.  I remember reading an article in Ring Magazine soon after he won the title which mentioned that he had difficulty reading the word "creatures" from a Nation of Islam-produced pamphlet.  He was akin to a child in a man's body.  His failure of the army intelligence test gave him an initial deferment.  It was only Defense Secretary Robert McNamara's "Project 100,000" in 1966 that enabled "Special Americans" like Ali, as he labeled them, to join the US Military.  McNamara promised that the military's resources could improve the intelligence of these recruits and make them suitable for service.  

Ali had little understanding of the Vietnam War.  His actions and his finances were under control of the Nation of Islam who had brokered a deal with the US Army to enable Ali to serve. He would have been allowed to continue his boxing career, all that would be required of him was to box exhibitions for the troops and visit wounded servicemen in hospitals and rehabilitation facilities.  The sticking  point for the Muslims had to do with his wearing a uniform. 

Amazingly, if Ali had not divorced his first wife, Sonji Roy, to whom he was abusive, his marital status along with his substandard mental abilities may have given him the deferment the Nation of Islam was seeking.

Read Thomas Hauser's excellent "Muhammad Ali And His Times' or Mark Kram's thought-provoking "Ghosts Of Manila" to understand the real Muhammad Ali as opposed  to the musings of talking heads that were not aware during this time and only get their opinions of him second hand.

 

 

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Hmmmm...and so I guess we're now at a point in this conversation to contemplate how many rounds Gary Cooper would've lasted in the ring with Muhammad Ali.

WITH of course the stipulation that they both would've been in their physical prime. 

(...my guess?...1 round, tops...although, Coop DID have quite a reach with those long arms of his ya know, and so maybe 2...and IF of course he could keep Ali at bay for a while with a few stiff left jabs)

;)

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Wait! Forget what I said about Coop lasting even one around with Ali.

Ya see, I suddenly remembered how bad his boxing form was in Ball of Fire and when he took on Dana Andrews.

(...and THAT didn't even last 1 MINUTE as I recall!)

 

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23 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Hmmmm...and so I guess we're now at a point in this conversation to contemplate how many rounds Gary Cooper would've lasted in the ring with Muhammad Ali.

WITH of course the stipulation that they both would've been in their physical prime. 

(...my guess?...1 round, tops...although, Coop DID have quite a reach with those long arms of his ya know, and so maybe 2...and IF of course he could keep Ali at bay for a while with a few stiff left jabs)

;)

 I wasn't aware that the champ was in this movie. But my favorite character actor Lon Chaney Jr is.  In his prime, I would be putting my money on the Wolfman. But if biting and clawing your opponent to death is not allowed, I'll go with Grace Kelly.

I'm just guessing, by looking at that hat she has on, that she has a hat pin the the length of a good pair of scissors which could put out a man's jugular. At least that's what my grandma told me that hat pins were used for in the old days. LOL

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4 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Wait! Forget what I said about Coop lasting even one around with Ali.

Ya see, I suddenly remembered how bad his boxing form was in Ball of Fire and when he took on Dana Andrews.

(...and THAT didn't even last ONE minute as I recall!)

 

An unfair comparison-Coop was playing a stuffy old professor:D

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4 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Wait! Forget what I said about Coop lasting even one around with Ali.

Ya see, I suddenly remembered how bad his boxing form was in Ball of Fire and when he took on Dana Andrews.

(...and THAT didn't even last 1 MINUTE as I recall!)

 

If he used the same boxing technique as in Ball of Fire Coop would make it to Round Two. He would have survived the first round because of all of Ali's laughing.

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8 minutes ago, NipkowDisc said:

that gun-happy quaker chick at the end.

:D

Image result for grace kelly high noon photos

Yep, and getting back to High Noon here...

Yep, sorry slayton, but I too am not buyin' your earlier premise that Grace's "religious principles", and be they newfound or ingrained since childhood, would've overridden her will and desire to help her husband survive.

(...been wantin' to say this since your initial post, but of course fracturing song lyrics must always take precedence in my case, ya know) ;)

 

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On 3/6/2018 at 9:37 PM, slaytonf said:

Oh, but what rankles, what is just the most intolerable thorn, what just goads me to continually shout at the screen is the inexplicable fear Will Kane has of Frank Miller.  He handled him before, what's different now?  Has Miller turned into some sort of super villain, with extraordinary powers?  I think not, so what's the big deal?  Frank Miller's back?  You handled him before, so just do the same thing.  Problem solved.

 

Last time the entire town was willing to help him. Everyone chickened out the second time.

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On 3/7/2018 at 2:42 PM, TomJH said:

Well then it must have been a revelation for you with Miller's three friends in High Noon since they really all do die for him (or because they hate Will Kane, it all boiling down to the same thing).

Whether this would happen in real life it depends. If we're talking about gang violence I can envision it. And Miller and his three friends would qualify as a western version of same.

More likely they just didn't expect to die and thought killing him would be easy.

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Well, this thread got very political and all over the map since I last checked in. I'm just going to comment on High Noon as a movie and not what political and social ramifications it has or what the definition of a hero is or anything so profound.

Having watched it just now for the first time in a few years, I was struck by what busybodies everyone in the town is. Everybody knows everything about everybody else. Maybe that was true in the small town Old West. But this particular town struck me in this viewing as really inauthentic: it's big or small as it needs to be in any given scene. I don't know where all the dozens and dozens of people we see in the church and the saloon combined live, based on how tiny everything looks in the exteriors. Maybe they're all off on farms in the outskirts somewhere? And what's with the church and the saloon being open at the same time? There wasn't some Bible-thumping contingent putting the kibosh on that kind of sinfulness? I mean, bars aren't open in America at 10:30 on a Sunday morning even in 2018! It had to be a Sunday, right? Although I don't know if it's ever said. Certainly nobody seems to have to go to work.

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19 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Well, this thread got very political and all over the map since I last checked in. I'm just going to comment on High Noon as a movie and not what political and social ramifications it has or what the definition of a hero is or anything so profound.

Having watched it just now for the first time in a few years, I was struck by what busybodies everyone in the town is. Everybody knows everything about everybody else. Maybe that was true in the small town Old West. But this particular town struck me in this viewing as really inauthentic: it's big or small as it needs to be in any given scene. I don't know where all the dozens and dozens of people we see in the church and the saloon combined live, based on how tiny everything looks in the exteriors. Maybe they're all off on farms in the outskirts somewhere? And what's with the church and the saloon being open at the same time? There wasn't some Bible-thumping contingent putting the kibosh on that kind of sinfulness? I mean, bars aren't open in America at 10:30 on a Sunday morning even in 2018! It had to be a Sunday, right? Although I don't know if it's ever said. Certainly nobody seems to have to go to work.

They mention that before Miller was imprisoned the town was rather seedy and women and children would look very out of place. It would make sense for everyone to know so much about each other.

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I haven't seen HN for a number of years, and really enjoyed watching it again tonight.
But had to wait until TKAMB was over before I could check in here and see what's up at the old rodeo.
BTW, TKAMB is one of those incredibly great movies that I must rewatch whenever it's on, if I am able.
Like the guest host said tonight, it has something for practically every audience at any age. I loved it when I first saw it as a kid, and am still loving (and learning from it) today!.

Back to HN...
I think that it is an almost perfect western. And of course so much more for anyone who wishes to delve deeper.

Someone mentioned about the town...
Busy bodies, yep. Most small towns (I mean really small by today's "standard", like 100-200 persons) still are. (the judge, Otto Kruger, even referred to it as a"little village" in the movie).
My grandparents lived in a rural agricultural community. Most all were farmers first.
The population on the Hwy sign read "105" when I was a kid, and the last time I visited (when they were both still alive) the sign still had that same number. Though I think the population was actually much less then, and perhaps nobody bothered to change that sign.
But yep, everybody knew every bodies business. Both the men and women gossiped about much the same things, only in a segregated fashion (women to women and men to men). A few persons actually lived in the town proper, but more than than half lived farther out on their farms. But the town was the center of the community. Had at least two churches (one Baptist and one Nazarene). Two service stations on opposite sides of the main highway, with a small general store at one. There was a combo hamburger joint and pool hall. Actually not much of a "hall" as it only had one pool table (sort of like that one in THE LAST PICTURE SHOW.) There was a post office, and an automotive shop. There was a town square surrounding a well treed park-like center, along with a gazebo.
When I visited as a kid during the summer there would always be a little carnival with a ferris wheel and a couple of rides, and of course concession stands, that made a circuit among the small towns in that area.
My mom told me that when she was a girl that they used to use the side of the largest building at one end of the square that was painted white, and project movies on it during those humid summer nights. Families would lay around on blankets in the square and watch old B movies and western serials, cartoons, newsreels and what not. The pool hall sold popcorn and soda, and someone had a cotton candy machine, and of course everybody brought goodies from home. This was during  the late 30's and I think about that when watching some of the stuff on TCM. 
But yeah, really small communities as depicted in HN were still very much like that even then.
For sure, the action in HN took place on a Sunday (unless the local church that Will solicited was a Seventh Day Adventists gathering). Will just got married and yep, the bar was open for business. Perhaps not all that "unbelievably" unusual, considering the time and locale. This was in the late 1800's (see'n as how they all seemed to be armed with Colt SA cartridge pistols) and still awhile before the temperance movement hit full swing. And (as it was mentioned) a mere five years earlier the town was wide open, it appears that they hadn't yet reached the stage where a saloon and a church couldn't both be open on the same day, at the same time (before noon on a Sunday). Of course the saloons weren't likely open 24 hrs, as when Will let one of the town drunks out of jail (played by Jack Elam) and told him to go home, he asked if the saloon was open yet.

Oh and back to the Frank Miller "gang."
There was only Franks wild brother Ben (Sheb Wooley), who would likely side with his brother in whatever vengeance scheme he had in mind (as some families are prone to do) so long as some wild times were to be had afterward.
Jim Pierce (Robert Wilke) who appeared to be the most level headed of the bunch, and loyal to Frank, likely because of much shared past experience (who knows, maybe like several of the James boys they had served together during the "War").
And of course Jack Colby (Lee Van Cleef) who also was an old member of the previous gang, though perhaps just along for the excitement that gunning down Will Kane would provide, as well as any later festivities once the town was again lawless.
And as far as when Kane "faced these guys before," not only did he have a slew of "deputized" townsmen with him at that time, but he was also accompanied by several experienced lawmen on his side, giving me the impression that the Miller gang was well outnumbered and outgunned. In gangs and war, numbers and experience often make the biggest difference.

And it was made quite evident that some attitudes had significantly shifted since then, and Will Kane was deserving of some sort of "come uppance." The hotel clerk, and some of those in the saloon voiced that a nice safe "law abiding" town was not to everyone's liking. Several there evidently missed the excitement (and money to be had) from the "bad ole days" and looked forward to them again with Franks return to Hadleyville.

And Will's little Quaker wife.
Yep, she did mention that both her father and brother had been gunned down while trying to do "the right thing," and her reaction to seeing that happen was why she chose to join (but not really become) a non-violent Quaker.
I see her as a woman coping with personal demons about losing her family to violence. But when push came to shove, and shots were fired, she could not idly let Will die like her brother and father, if she could help prevent it. And so she took up the sword because the love for her man outweighed any new found religious convictions that she was trying to make her own. 

I say again, an almost perfect western. :)
(Of course that is only "my" personal opinion)

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20 hours ago, johnpressman said:

Stephan55, that is a well-written essay regarding Muhammad Ali, but I beg to differ with you on some of the issues surrounding the decision not to serve in the US military.

Watching Cassius Clay beat Sonny Liston for the Heavyweight Championship on a live closed circuit broadcast at Manhattan's Rivoli Theater on February 25, 1964 was the beginning of my love affair with boxing and, briefly, with the new champion.

When he announced his conversion to the Nation of Islam and spoke on behalf of its' racist and separatist doctrine, I turned away from him but not the sport itself.  By the way, few remember that his original Muslim name was Cassius X, in the manner of his mentor and hero Malcolm X.  When Malcolm was excommunicated by Elijah Muhammad, Ali turned his back on Malcolm who was subsequently murdered.  Some say that Louis Farrakhan was one of the killers. 

Muhammad Ali had an IQ of 78.  I remember reading an article in Ring Magazine soon after he won the title which mentioned that he had difficulty reading the word "creatures" from a Nation of Islam-produced pamphlet.  He was akin to a child in a man's body.  His failure of the army intelligence test gave him an initial deferment.  It was only Defense Secretary Robert McNamara's "Project 100,000" in 1966 that enabled "Special Americans" like Ali, as he labeled them, to join the US Military.  McNamara promised that the military's resources could improve the intelligence of these recruits and make them suitable for service.  

Ali had little understanding of the Vietnam War.  His actions and his finances were under control of the Nation of Islam who had brokered a deal with the US Army to enable Ali to serve. He would have been allowed to continue his boxing career, all that would be required of him was to box exhibitions for the troops and visit wounded servicemen in hospitals and rehabilitation facilities.  The sticking  point for the Muslims had to do with his wearing a uniform. 

Amazingly, if Ali had not divorced his first wife, Sonji Roy, to whom he was abusive, his marital status along with his substandard mental abilities may have given him the deferment the Nation of Islam was seeking.

Read Thomas Hauser's excellent "Muhammad Ali And His Times' or Mark Kram's thought-provoking "Ghosts Of Manila" to understand the real Muhammad Ali as opposed  to the musings of talking heads that were not aware during this time and only get their opinions of him second hand.

 

Hi John. So nice to speak with you again. :)
I know that you are a huge boxing enthusiast, and thought that you were an ongoing fan of Cassius Clay (aka Muhammad Ali) as well. I think that I may have shared with you that I once dabbled a bit in boxing myself, on the west coast, and though I enjoy a "good" fight, I never really considered myself a true fan of the "sport" as most others that I knew. 
I'm certainly not as familiar with Muhammad Ali as you apparently are. And I've not read either of those two books you mentioned, but will add them to my ever growing "must read" wish list.  
I was aware that Ali was locked-in rather firmly with the Elijah Muhammad sect and as such disenfranchised himself from his former mentor and friend Malcolm when he was "excommunicated." But I don't believe that in his later years he continued to maintain such a mindless belief system, did he?
Knowing little at the time it was happening, I too joined the anti-Ali crowd in the sixties. A lot of us knew no better then and, along with Ali, few of us then, and even now, have much understanding about what the Vietnam War was really all about.
What I do know about McNamara's "Project 100,000" was that it was a way to get more bodies into the war.
Yeah, I am aware that the Johnson hype promulgated it as part of his "War on Poverty," but it also loosened up all of the other "standards" (height, weight, English proficiency, etc.) as well as IQ. 
BTW, my personal experience with the military has been that it doesn't take a genius to be able to follow simple orders and carry and shoot a rifle. In fact to be too "smart" can sometimes become a detriment, as some fellow soldiers got into  trouble with a few superiors because as they put it, they refused to check in their brains while wearing the uniform. 
Regarding Ali's 78 intelligence quotient. I know many persons with very high IQ's that seem to lack what we used to call "common sense." I am also aware that in the south some quite ridiculous "IQ" tests were devised to exclude persons from access to many things, including voting. I know that the army has made exceptions in many cases, allowing persons to serve even when they failed the ASVAB. I am personally familiar with several indigenous "recruits" from rural Alaska that were given "special latitude" with "letters of exception" placed in their 201 file, and allowed to continue training even though they were unable to read or relate to terms that were commonly used by persons raised in an urban environment in the lower '48. These "Eskimo Scouts" had terrific arctic survival skills, but down in the states, they were essentially classified as "morons."
Someone who never learned to properly read or who doesn't read or speak English, may easily fail a lot of rudimentary "tests." But it doesn't necessarily follow that they are "stupid" by any other means.
I'm aware that persons from poorer socioeconomic backgrounds tend to likewise score poorer on such "intelligence" and "aptitude" tests.
I think it was Gandhi that said "poverty is the cruelest form of violence."

I met and spoke with Muhammad Ali in Inglewood California, before he was severely stricken by the symptoms of repeated traumatic brain injury. In our brief conversation I detected nothing that made me think that he was of lower intelligence than myself, quite the contrary. I know that doesn't really mean anything assessment wise. But I have seen and listened to him speak on numerous occasions, and he was very quick and spontaneous. I never viewed him as an automaton and find it difficult to believe that the Nation of Islam controlled every profound word he ever uttered. 
If he was like a "child in a man's body", then that descriptor can likely be applied to a lot of us, including myself at different times.
The most significantly "stupid" thing that I think Ali did was to continue to fight and get his brains battered well beyond his prime. But that appears to be a common problem with a lot of contact sport professionals. 
Not saying that him stopping would have halted or reversed the degenerative processes already at work, but they certainly exacerbated them.  
Ali was not a perfect person by any means. But the point I tried to make in my earlier post about him was that I believed that his actions illustrated that he was a sincere and courageous human being. More so than most that I have known. And I base that on the belief that he truly understood the consequences of those specific actions before he acted upon them. And he said what he said and did what he did based on his personal convictions of what was right and wrong at the time.
Until I see, hear, read and believe something entirely to contrary, my feelings about the man will no doubt remain constant.
That said, I like to think of myself as open minded in most regards. I don't generally arrive at specific conclusions without a great deal of thought about them. I am not opposed to learning something new about anything, but once I have formed an opinion it does sometime take quite a bit of self-convincing to change my mind.

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On 3/7/2018 at 10:13 PM, slaytonf said:

I suppose I'll have to watch the movie again, because I don't recall the details you cite.  
..............................

 

Well did yah???? :huh:
Did you watch it again last night?
I did, and I was getting a little anxious for awhile wondering when Amy was going to say something about her family being killed for standing up and doing the right thing and explaining that is why she became a Quaker... I hadn't watched this flick for like 10 years or so, and for a little while I began to wonder if I'd somehow confabulated that whole scene. Then she was up in Helen's room and said it to her. Whew! I felt vindicated.

I'd forgotten just how good this movie really was.

Anyhoo, was just wondering if you re-watched it like you said, and if you are still thinking the same way about it or not?
If I remember correctly, you or someone else brought up similar questions in a thread about High Noon a few years ago???
So I was hoping that this time there might be a little resolution to this one? .... Before this thread heads disappears into La La Land that is.
Come on Slayton, I like the way your mind works, so don't keep us hang'n aroun' here until high noon to find out??? :)
Besides I think Dargo wants to wrap this baby up with another refrain to his ballad... :D

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Y'know, there's ALWAYS some "flaw" in every movie that's obvious to most who saw the movie, but most too, overlook because it IS just a movie, and not a re-creation of an actual event.  Depending of course, on the movie and subject matter.

For a movie like TORA!  TORA!  TORA! you're gonna want to avoid as many "flaws" as possible since the events in the movie had supposedly actually taken place.  But in a movie like HIGH NOON, which doesn't depict an actual event, but is a story that takes place back in an actual period of American history, the only  "flaw(s)" can be something anachronistically out of place, like Coop and Grace leaving town in a Model A Ford, or by helicopter.  Or Coop and Miller's gang shooting it out with Tommy guns.  

There's no saying "This wouldn't happen" or "that couldn't possibly be...."  or finding some perceived "flaw" in other people's behavior in a given situation since I don't think anybody on these boards are old enough to know just HOW people "back then" would act, react or otherwise behave in any given situation, especially one that the poster personally has never faced or was involved with at any time.  And personally, all that any of US can do is relate how we personally would like to THINK we would act or react in certain situations, but until we actually DO face them, have NO idea how we'd actually  fare in those instances. 

But don't mind me.....

It's been one of those mornings/weeks/whatever......   ;)

Sepiatone

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17 hours ago, Stephan55 said:

Well did yah???? :huh:
Did you watch it again last night?
I did, and I was getting a little anxious for awhile wondering when Amy was going to say something about her family being killed for standing up and doing the right thing and explaining that is why she became a Quaker... I hadn't watched this flick for like 10 years or so, and for a little while I began to wonder if I'd somehow confabulated that whole scene. Then she was up in Helen's room and said it to her. Whew! I felt vindicated.

I'd forgotten just how good this movie really was.

Anyhoo, was just wondering if you re-watched it like you said, and if you are still thinking the same way about it or not?
If I remember correctly, you or someone else brought up similar questions in a thread about High Noon a few years ago???
So I was hoping that this time there might be a little resolution to this one? .... Before this thread heads disappears into La La Land that is.
Come on Slayton, I like the way your mind works, so don't keep us hang'n aroun' here until high noon to find out??? :)
Besides I think Dargo wants to wrap this baby up with another refrain to his ballad... :D

Sorry I didn't get back to you sooner. No I didn't. I don't know if I set my DVR to record it. But I'm away from home now, and it'll have to wait until I get back. If I didn't I'll have to wait until it re-airs. I don't see it on watch TCM

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On 3/8/2018 at 3:01 PM, TomJH said:

The following is from Jeffrey Meyers' Gary Cooper American Hero:

Foreman wrote that in 1951, the most difficult time to support an accused and then blacklisted writer, Cooper "put his whole career on the block in the face of the McCarthyite witch hunters who were terrorizing Hollywood." After Foreman was subpoenaed in April, "Cooper was immediately subjected to a violent underground pressure campaign aimed at getting him to leave the film, and he was told that unless he agreed to do so he, too, would be blacklisted in Hollywood for the rest of his life. But Cooper believed in me. He saw it through."

I'm resurrecting this thread, since I'm new here and I'm not sure yet if it's OK to open new threads and when. This recent article adds some more details about Wayne's involvement in Foreman's blacklisting and, let's be honest, his real character:

Was John Wayne High Noon’s Biggest Villain?

Great comments, everyone! Oh, and hi!

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On 3/7/2018 at 1:00 AM, Dargo said:

♪♪ Do not forsake Coop, oh dear slayton

For this is just this movie's theme

Do not forsake Coop, oh dear slayton

Wait, wait along

I do not know why you're so hard on

Poor Grace, she does the best she can

Although yes Katy's the strong one

For Coop will show he's, yes he will show he's

Coop will show he's still good with a gun ♪♪

 

(...okay sure...think YOU can do a better Tex Ritter impression do ya?...then be my guest!)

;)

 

 

 

 

Darg, have you been dreaming of a hillbilly heaven again? You need to stop eating those peanut butter and banana fried sandwiches before slumber and Tex will stop visiting you nightly.
 

When I see "High Noon" I just keep repeating "It is only a movie, it is only a movie..."

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1 hour ago, myrtus said:

I'm resurrecting this thread, since I'm new here and I'm not sure yet if it's OK to open new threads and when. This recent article adds some more details about Wayne's involvement in Foreman's blacklisting and, let's be honest, his real character:

Was John Wayne High Noon’s Biggest Villain?

Great comments, everyone! Oh, and hi!

Welcome to the boards, myrtus. And thanks for the link here. Good read there, alright.

Yep, seems poor ol' Big Duke was always just dense enough to never recognize how truly an American story High Noon really was, huh.

(...I mean, with a story entailing people looking after their own petty individual self-interests and to the exclusion of participating as a collective and united entity, how freakin' "American" can you GET I ask, RIGHT?!!) ;)

LOL

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Thanks, Dargo!

I think it's as "American" as it can get, you are absolutely right. I used to find it amusing, that Wayne didn't jump to claim Kane's courage and self-sacrifice as the ultimate American virtues. At first, I thought it was just jealousy, but seeing how horrible he was from the beginning, I don't feel like laughing anymore. He was truly the villain of this story.

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10 hours ago, myrtus said:

I'm resurrecting this thread, since I'm new here and I'm not sure yet if it's OK to open new threads and when. This recent article adds some more details about Wayne's involvement in Foreman's blacklisting and, let's be honest, his real character:

Was John Wayne High Noon’s Biggest Villain?

Great comments, everyone! Oh, and hi!

Anyone who resurrects a thread of mine and heightens my profile is aces with me!  And you can open as many threads as your fingers can stand.  Post away.

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8 hours ago, Dargo said:

Welcome to the boards, myrtus. And thanks for the link here. Good read there, alright.

Yep, seems poor ol' Big Duke was always just dense enough to never recognize how truly an American story High Noon really was, huh.

(...I mean, with a story entailing people looking after their own petty individual self-interests and to the exclusion of participating as a collective and united entity, how freakin' "American" can you GET I ask, RIGHT?!!) ;)

LOL

Oh, oh, 'collective,' so tinged with socialist taint.  How 'bout 'community?'  Has a much more heartland feel to it.

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