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sewhite2000

Entertainment Weekly's Oscar Issue

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I'm late posting this, because I think this is the last day it will be on the stands, but I hope some of you caught Entertainment Weekly's issue that came out before the Oscars, as it has a lot to appeal to classic movie fans. On the occasion of Oscar's 90th anniversary, EW devoted a lot of articles to elements of Oscar history. Granted, the maximum length of any of these "articles" was two pages, so a lot of them were more like blurbs. But I enjoyed them. Moving more or less in chronological order, there were articles on:

The First Oscar Night

How Oscar Got Its Name

Luise Rainer, "The First Meryl Streep" (Well, that was a bit of an exaggeration, but a nice recap of her life and career)

Mrs. Miniver

Hattie McDaniel (this article curiously seemed to want to imply her career went into a tailspin after Gone With the Wind, but I disagree - she just kept right on doing what she'd always done)

Julie Andrews, Audrey Hepburn, Marnie Nixon and My Fair Lady

Haley Mills, the final recipient of the Academy's special juvenile award

Jacques Cousteau, Three-Time Oscar-Winner?!!?

Gloria Grahame

Miyoshi Umeki

How did Sidney Poitier not get a Best Actor nomination in 1967 when he was in two Best Picture nominees (and one winner) and another film that was among the 10 highest-grossing of the year?

Jane Fonda comments on all her nominated performances

The Oscar streaker and what happened to him

Titanic

James L. Brooks

Kevin Kline's surprise win for a comedic performance

The "Stars of Tomorrow" number at the ceremony for the 1988 nominations (though I know I watched this - I distinctly remember Rob Lowe doing a CCR number with Snow White and Dustin Hoffman's acceptance speech - I have completely forgotten this number. This was a fascinating read)

Gabrielle Anwar and the role she may have played in helping Al Pacino finally win an Oscar

Markata Irglova finally gets to speak after the commercial break

And an article on the juicy Crash vs Brokeback Mountain controversy!

Good stuff!

 

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I just ordered this issue from the EW web site.  Thanks for the info.  I find Oscar history (really, all history) interesting - often better than the actual presentation on the awards themselves.

I remember that Rob Lowe - Snow White number:  yikes!  Sometimes you have to wonder who OKs these awful production numbers and why nobody stops them.  As Barney Fife said in the old "Andy Griffith Show":  "Nip it.  Just nip it in the bud."  :)

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On 3/8/2018 at 12:04 PM, sewhite2000 said:

I'm late posting this, because I think this is the last day it will be on the stands, but I hope some of you caught Entertainment Weekly's issue that came out before the Oscars, as it has a lot to appeal to classic movie fans. On the occasion of Oscar's 90th anniversary, EW devoted a lot of articles to elements of Oscar history. Granted, the maximum length of any of these "articles" was two pages, so a lot of them were more like blurbs. But I enjoyed them.m that was among the 10 highest-grossing of the year?

 

My favorite piece was the interview with Hayley Mills -- the last winner of the Juvenile Oscar (for "Pollyanna"). She was at a boarding school in England and didn't know she was getting the award until it arrived on her doorstep.

She also lost it years later and asked the Academy for a replacement. The response: "I'm sorry, it doesn't work like that."

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A recurring theme of the issue seemed to be lost or stolen Oscars, or Oscars whose present location could only be vaguely guessed at. And with the temporary theft of Frances McDormand's Oscar, it just goes on!

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1 hour ago, sewhite2000 said:

A recurring theme of the issue seemed to be lost or stolen Oscars, or Oscars whose present location could only be vaguely guessed at. And with the temporary theft of Frances McDormand's Oscar, it just goes on!

That was a great issue and I loved how much emphasis was given to Oscar history.

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I have the issue at home, but havent read it yet. I got a 6 month free subscription from them......

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Yes, this issue of EW was a great read.  I liked the circumstances of how Crash beat out Brokeback Mountain (the favorite) for Best Picture.  

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I used to buy the Oscar Issues of EW but strangely enough they are scarce to come by in my area nowadays, why I don't know.

I remember I always enjoyed reading them too. I like reading all of Oscar's history.

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Distribution of Entertainment Weekly has been incredibly poor in my city for about five months now, as well. Maybe half of all the issues that should have arrived in my city over that time ever actually showed up. I don't know if they're having financial troubles or distribution department troubles or what. Although the last two issues have arrived when they were supposed to. I'm hoping for the best.

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3 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Distribution of Entertainment Weekly has been incredibly poor in my city for about five months now, as well. Maybe half of all the issues that should have arrived in my city over that time ever actually showed up. I don't know if they're having financial troubles or distribution department troubles or what. Although the last two issues have arrived when they were supposed to. I'm hoping for the best.

You should have fun trying to find the brand-new issue then. It's an "Avengers: Infinity War" preview with 15 commemorative covers! Name a Marvel superhero from the upcoming movie and there's a cover. I got Black Panther in the mail, which surprised me. I would have guessed I'd get Thanos.

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A Barnes & Noble employee once suggested to me that the collectible cover editions are sometimes a problem: that they will sell out very quickly or not even reach their destinations. This collectible-cover obsession was one of the primary factors that helped ruin comic books for me in the '90s. I would like to think magazine readers aren't as obsessive about them as comic book readers, but I don't know. I'm beginning to feel like, Oscar nostalgia aside, Entertainment Weekly is geared toward the very young. Another poster on here, I've forgotten who, said the magazine fired every writer over 30 a few years ago. I'm not sure that's entirely true, but I've noticed the writing is beginning to introduce hipster terminology without even offering a definition. They just assume their mass readership already knows what they mean. I've learned the words woke, cisgender and bougie all from reading EW. (I have the latest iOS on my iPhone, and Autocorrect lets all three of those words fly by without getting upset. On my laptop, however, those last two words set off my spell check when I type them in on the TCM message boards. Heck, iOS, Autocorrect and yes, even TCM all set off my spell check!)

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