MissGoddess

Off Topic: Favorite Music?

6,605 posts in this topic

His LP 'Slim Slo Slider' (1970) was mostly an album of covers - which was usual for him (he did such a great job covering other people's work and giving it his own particular reading) - rarely doing more than one or two of his own original compositions on an album. On this one he covered Van Morrison's 'Slim Slo Slider' in two sections - the album's opening track and then again on an extended version to close the album.

 

Additionally he did this one of Van's as well (I believe it was track 9).

 

 

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The Moody Blues - Your Wildest Dreams

 

Don't you just love music that's actually musical?

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A few weeks ago I heard a story in the news about a bunch of university students ( and, I'm sorry to say, this was in Ontario), who objected when a particular song was played at a social event at said university. The protests to the song demonstrate just how silly and ignorant ( "ignorant" in the original sense of "lacking knowledge" ) these students were.

They were claiming that this song was offensive and "hurtful"  (it's amazing how easily hurt people are now) to trans people. 

IF they'd (a) had the slightest knowledge of pop music history, or any interest in music made before 2010 (year chosen arbitrarily), they'd have been familiar with this great song, and it wouldn't have been any surprise to them to hear it     and

( b ) If they'd heard of the singer, who was an avid supporter of trans and gay people's rights long before it was in style to do so    and

( c ) even if they knew nothing of the history of the song or the singer, IF they'd actually listened intelligently to the lyrics....

 

...they would have celebrated this great piece of music, cheered it as a shout-out to trans people everywhere, and been happy that such a timeless cool song was being played at their social event.

 

Silly fools. ( as opposed to sensible fools...)

 

 

Hey Lou...take a walk on the wild side.

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A few weeks ago I heard a story in the news about a bunch of university students ( and, I'm sorry to say, this was in Ontario), who objected when a particular song was played at a social event at said university. The protests to the song demonstrate just how silly and ignorant ( "ignorant" in the original sense of "lacking knowledge" ) these students were.

They were claiming that this song was offensive and "hurtful"  (it's amazing how easily hurt people are now) to trans people. 

IF they'd (a) had the slightest knowledge of pop music history, or any interest in music made before 2010 (year chosen arbitrarily), they'd have been familiar with this great song, and it wouldn't have been any surprise to them to hear it     and

( b ) If they'd heard of the singer, who was an avid supporter of trans and gay people's rights long before it was in style to do so    and

( c ) even if they knew nothing of the history of the song or the singer, IF they'd actually listened intelligently to the lyrics....

 

...they would have celebrated this great piece of music, cheered it as a shout-out to trans people everywhere, and been happy that such a timeless cool song was being played at their social event.

 

Silly fools. ( as opposed to sensible fools...)

 

It's unbelievable how ****** up universities have become. 

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Referred to by one critic as "the Caruso of rock", it seemed Gene Pitney could do no wrong from 1961 to 1966. At least a dozen hits (more actually) and millions of records sold.

 

But after 1966, he had only one more hit - in 1968 - called 'She's a Heartbreaker'.

 

I always thought that this one should have been a hit for him as well, but it wasn't. I sure liked it. Still do.

 

Whoops - you'll have to click on the link to watch it.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1wIT6gh6c4&list=RDk1wIT6gh6c4

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Arsan404 - THANK YOU!!!!!!!  Wow, what a voice.  David Cassidy could have been so much more than that bubble gum teenybopper idol - he had the looks, the voice and the acting skills to be much more.....he was too typecast though after Partridge Family.     

 

He sang one of the best renditions of "as time goes by" in that clip.     He was also stunningly handsome too.

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Ricky was without question the greatest of the "teen idols". Only Elvis had more hits and sold more records from 1956 to 1962. Over Nelson's career he hit the charts at least 30 times.

 

When he turned 21, he dropped the "y". His last hits were labeled to Rick Nelson.

 

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Ricky Nelson - great voice, great looking.  For teen idols, I thought David Cassidy was the best teen idol by far.  He actually had a larger fan base than the Beatles and Elvis COMBINED.    (back in 1971-1972).

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Referred to by one critic as "the Caruso of rock", it seemed Gene Pitney could do no wrong from 1961 to 1966. At least a dozen hits (more actually) and millions of records sold.

 

But after 1966, he had only one more hit - in 1968 - called 'She's a Heartbreaker'.

 

I always thought that this one should have been a hit for him as well, but it wasn't. I sure liked it. Still do.

 

Here's another of his post-1966 releases that I think deserved to be a hit but wasn't.

 

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I watched the original un-narrated version of 'Dementia' today. I'd seen it previously only in its later Ed McMahon narrated version known as 'Daughter of Horror'.

 

Anyway, reminded me of this Faith No More video that utilized the movie's imagery.

 

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Thank you, Glen Campbell, for making this timeless. 

 

 

My favorite of his.  Someone (in Wiki, maybe?)  described it as the "first existential country song."

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Had been hearing bits of this song in a commercial and finally figured out it is Harry Nilsson's "Jump Into the Fire."  Maybe decades since I've heard it, but it holds up well.  In the commercial it sounds like something maybe written today.

 

Not the greatest sound in this clip from a 1974 horror movie, but it features many a luminary, most of them now gone:

 

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