MissGoddess

Off Topic: Favorite Music?

6,949 posts in this topic

My enjoyment of Sinatra tends to depend on the song. My parents had a couple of his albums. The "Trilogy" (?) and the one with "It Was A Very Good Year." We have one of his Christmas albums and he sounds asleep through most of it. But he had a great voice. My daughter gave my wife and I a Sinatra CD set for Christmas. My bride likes him more than I but I certainly appreciate his talent.

 

In that style of music my favorites are Andy Williams, Johnny Mathis and John Gary. Many people don't know Gary but his voice was so pure. He could be gentle and hold a note long after most mortals would have passed out. It's great so much of this music is being released again.

 

Many people may not know that Jackie Gleason had an orchestra he recorded with and they had such a lush and romantic sound. They had a great sound.

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Hi Chris---I never heard of John Gray. I love Gleason's theme music to The Honeymooners, which shows how talented he was musically. He was a remarkable man, I am sure he could do anything and do it well. I love the guy. He's the only reason I will watch The Hustler.

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Lotte Lenya recorded "September Song"? Wow. I love that song.

 

It's on a 2-disc (that's "vinyl", not "CD") set called The Lotte Lenya Album: The Berlin and American Theater Songs of Kurt Weill. I just checked on Amazon and it has it on CD "New and Used, From $49.99". Maybe my vinyl is worth something. I'd like to say that I inherited it from my Grandfather, but I bought it when it was released (just like I got 45's in the '50s).

 

Although I enjoy film music in the context of the film, I've never been enamored with listening to instrumental soundtracks. In fact, I think I own only one (which I love and, yes, it is on vinyl): Last Tango in Paris by Gato Barbieri. There are three versions of the theme -- a tango, a ballad, and a waltz -- and each is lovelier than the other.

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I'm trying to think what song it is that Louis Armstrong sings where he mentions Lotte Lenya by name...I just heard it this morning and I've already forgotten the title.

 

Hi fidelity enthusiasts always tell me vinyl sounds the best. I only own two vinyl LPs that I bought at a vintage shop in London. They are both Sinatra albums. But unfortunately I don't own a record player so I've never listened to them (I have one on cd).

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i used to put honey in my tea but then i discovered cream. heehee! i havent tried them together. hmmm. maybve i should do that tonight and see if i like it that way. i mainly just put cream in my tea. no sugar or anything else. heehee! oh i could never get tea'd out. i love it too much, but ill put a word into the bees for you to go overtime. heehee!

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>I'm trying to think what song it is that Louis Armstrong sings where he mentions Lotte Lenya by name...I just heard it this morning and I've already forgotten the title.

 

 

I think you are trying to remeber "Mack The Knife."

 

I got a cool present for my birthday last year. A turntable that will convert vinyl albums for itunes and allow you to make a CD. It also serves as a regular turntable. (Even regular turntables aren't that expensive. Assuming you have the system to hook it up to.) It's been fun and it's great for those albums I have I know will never make it to CD.

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Wow, I had no idea they had such a thing. That is something worth having....ummm, if I only had a stereo system. ;) I actually looked at some today at Best Buy and Circuit City---I was really looking at dvd recorders but I wandered into Hi-Fi land. I don't really have the room for a full on system. So I guess I just have to be satisfied with either listening on my computer, boom box or dvd player.

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I'm trying to think what song it is that Louis Armstrong sings where he mentions Lotte Lenya by name...I just heard it this morning and I've already forgotten the title.

 

I think you are trying to remeber "Mack The Knife."

 

Yep -- Good ol' Mackie Messer's back in town. It is "Moritat" originally, but "Mack the Knife", or "Theme from The Threepenny Opera", in English. Satchmo released his version in 1956 (#20 on the Billboard Pop Chart) and Bobby Darin (nee Walden Robert Cassotto) released his version with the same "Lotte Lenya" addition in 1959 (#1 for 9 weeks on the Billboard Pop Chart). Six other versions (Dick Hyman Trio, Richard Hayman & Jan August, Lawrence Welk, Billy Vaughn, Les Paul, & Ella Fitzgerald) hit the Top 100 between 1956 and 1960.

 

If Dewey is out there: Who sang the version that Ernie Kovacs used on his TV show?

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Cool! Thanks, ChiO for that background on the song. I knew it had had another title originally, but I didn't know about the "3 penny opera" connection. I've heard Satchmo's, Bobby's and Ella's versions and love them all. Maybe I like Bobby's the best, I think it was certainly his best song.

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ChiO- Was the Ernie Kovacs version from the first recording of "Die Dreigroschenoper" (Threepenny Opera) in 1930? If so it would maybe have been Kurt Gerron? I used to have this album (that dates me doesn't it?) but it must have got lost in a move.

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I agree with you regarding John Gary and the Jackie Gleason Orchestra.

I am a lover of the older big bands and I listen to some of them every night

while I play Scrabble online.

First posting in quite some time.

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>I got a cool present for my birthday last year.

>A turntable that will convert vinyl albums for itunes

>and allow you to make a CD. It also serves as a regular turntable.

 

Hi Chris,

 

I've seen those USB turntables - that was a new idea for me.

I'm a vinyl collector from way back but have always been hesitant to put much time into converting vinyl to digital for fear of a new or better way coming along.

My slacking paid off this time!

Since I own a decent turntable and after doing a little research I came up with

a digital converter box - the UA-1EX USB Audio Interface from Roland:

 

http://www.edirol.net/products/en/UA-1EX/

 

It was around $70. It digitizes the analog signal from your phonograph outputs and

then plugs into the USB port on your computer. So that's another option out there.

Of course, I haven't got around to messing with it yet.

 

Slacking again...

 

Snorky

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max steiner's movies(he composed music for many of gary's movies. heehee)

 

gone with the wind

the old maid

intermezzo

now voyager

adventures of don juan

all mine to give

the mcconnell story

the hanging tree

on moonlight bay

 

ill wake up with these scores in my head randomly sometimes.

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But I don't remember John Gay ever singing with the Gleason orchestra however, I may be wrong nevertheless both were so lyrical and oh so good to hear UNLIKE, all that junk today that's supposed to be music !

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Tonight (Thursday, Jan. 31) is going to be a very good night for romantic soundtracks. Starting with:

 

"The Enchanted Cottage"

 

"Portrait of Jennie"

 

"Now Voyager"

 

"Intermezzo"

 

There are more but these were the ones that caught my eye, I mean, ear.

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Leo:

 

I brought up John Gary and Gleason but I didn't mean to suggest that Gary sang with Gleason.

 

Gary had such a wonderful voice. He was fairly successful for a time but he never reached the level of success like Andy Williams, Mathis, Como and singers like those.

 

Chris

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I realized this morning as my daughter was watching TCM before school, that one of my favorite movies was on. I was in the kitchen, but I knew immediately what movie was on, because of the music. The Adventures of Robin Hood has one of the greatest and most memorable scores ever. Especially the part that starts with

 

Deee Dum/ dee dum de dum de dum......

 

I love that movie.

 

Erich Wolfgang Korngold rocks!

 

http://www.korngold-society.org/

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I, too, Miss Goddess, admired Bernard Herrmann's scores for THE GHOST AND MRS. MUIR, VERTIGO, MARNIE, for the way they atmospherically enhanced the story lines. However, of the films you listed, PORTRAIT OF JENNIE was scored by Dimitri Tiomkin, except for the Debussy excerpts (which he adapted or arranged)), so perfectly appropriate for the haunting and surreal qualities of the film. BH also scored CITIZEN KANE

 

My favorite film scorer has always been hard to isolate from the others, most of whom, armed with impressive credentials and often virtuoso musicianship, fled the Nazis in the 30s, found work at Hollywood studios and made huge contributions to the industry. But MAX STEINER's music, that distinguished so many Warner Bros.films (after he left RKO) I found distinctively recognizable and has been my favorite. Academy Awards for THE INFORMER, NOW, VOYAGER, SINCE YOU WENT AWAY and 15 others nominated, including GONE WITH THE WIND, THE LETTER, THE BIG SLEEP, TREASURE OF SIERRA MADRE, THE FOUNTAINHEAD. Other favorites follow::

 

Shamefully, the most overlooked film composer was ROY WEBB, Music Director at RKO, who scored NOTORIOUS, KITTY FOYLE, I REMEMBER MAMA, CAT PEOPLE, CASS TIMBERLANE, and (I think) THE ENCHANTED COTTAGE, among others.

 

BRONISLAU KAPER (for years at MGM), won an Academy Award for LILI.

 

ERICH WOLFGANG KORNGOLD, Warner Bros.' other star composer, won Academy Awards for ANTHONY ADVERSE and THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD.

 

VICTOR YOUNG (for years at Paramount) won an AA for AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS, scored prominent films like THE PALM BEACH STORY, FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS, LOVE LETTERS, THE QUIET MAN, SHANE.

 

ALFRED NEWMAN (mainly 20th Century-Fox), the most honored , with 9 AA; worked on 200 films, including WUTHERING HEIGHTS, SONG OF BERNADETTE (AA) .

 

FRANZ WAXMAN won 2 AA--A PLACE IN THE SUN and SUNSET BLVD. Other films: REBECCA, PHILADELPHIA STORY, HUMORESQUE, REAR WINDOW.

 

MIKLOS ROZSO--3 Academy Awards, out of 16 niminations. SPELLBOUND, A DOUBLE LIFE,

BEN-HUR. Also scored such films as THE LOST WEEKEND, DOUBLE INDEMNITY, MADAME BOVARY, JULIUS CAESAR.

 

And, of course, European film composers, who enriched films by their distinctive talents.

I've obviously (and unfairly) omitted deserving others, but these are the ones who helped make films memorable for me during my adolescent and mature years.

 

Madeleine2322

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Hi Madeleine---Max Steiner was the first composer I became aware of and his scores are deservedly remembered. I will always cherish many of them, including his score for *The Searchers* and Gone with the Wind.

 

*Roy Webb* is one composer I'm just beginning to discover and appreciate. He and *Alex North* seem to pop up on more and more favorites. There is something very mood-appropriate and emotionally stirring about all of their scores.

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i was just watching random harvest the other day and i totally forogt about the score of it, i always get so into the movie that i didnt pay attention to the music in it, but i noticed it this time and i hadnt realized that i had it in my head b/c i had seen it so many times. heehee! i am now adding this to my fav music scores. what do you think april? ;)

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I found the music in "The 400 Blows" very moving. I don't know if it was scored, or if it was random music picked out by Truffaut; but the lightness of the music in combination with the weight of the story made me very emotional. It also made you understand Doinel a little better- the music only played when he was outside.

 

I just found out that the original music was written by Jean Constantin.

 

Message was edited by: JackFavell

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Hola ButterscotchTea! I don't really remember the music from *Random Harvest* but I can imagine it must be lushly romantic. I'll pay more attention next time...and it's a good 'scuse to watch it agin! ;)

 

Did we mention the music in *Gilda* yet? Besides our trademark "Put the Blame on Mame", I really like "Amato Mio"---in fact, I'd love to have the whole soundtrack on cd. I wonder if it's released?

 

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I haven't yet watched *The 400 Blows* but I caught a glimpse of it earlier. One French movie whose soundtrack I love to listen to is Un Homme et Une Femme, music by Francis Lai.

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