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Bogie56

Orson Welles' The Other Side of the Wind

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http://www.wellesnet.com

This from the highly recommended Wellesnet web site:

Michel Legrand composing, recording ‘The Other Side of the Wind’ score

March 19, 2018 
michel legrand

Michel Legrand

Michel Legrand, who scored Orson Welles' 1973 film essay F For Fake, has composed music for the soon-to-be-released The Other Side of the Wind.

Orchestral recording began today in Belgium and will continue with a jazz ensemble later this week in Paris. Legrand, 86, began working on the score since December.

Producer Frank Marshall reflected on Legrand's participation in an interview with Variety.

“After working with Michel on F for Fake and wanting a jazz-based score, Orson always spoke about him doing the music for Wind," recalled Marshall, who was a line producer on the 1970s shoot. "So it is wonderful to have this three-time Academy Award winner on board, and a thrill to sit and spot the music with Michel, who, at 86 years old, still has tremendous energy, creativity and a twinkle in his eye.”

Legrand described what he has composed as “one of the most exciting and delicate scores” he has written in his 60 years of scoring films.  Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: orson-wellesthe-other-side-of-the-wind
Posted in F For FakeNewsThe Other Side of The Wind | 

Update: ‘The Other Side of the Wind’ almost done!

March 17, 2018 
Tech_ColorTiming.jpeg

Colorist Mike Sowa with editor Bob Murawski color-timing a scene from Orson Welles'  The Other Side of the Wind(Royal Road Entertainment photo) 

More than 42 years after principal photography wrapped on Orson Welles' The Other Side of the Wind, a "locked picture" is finally in place.  It is being color-corrected with sound work continuing as the movie nears release.

Producer Filip Jan Rymsza offered a production update to Indiegogo contributors on Saturday, noting that it was just a year ago the negative arrived in Los Angeles.

"We’re now out of editorial and into dust-busting, restoration and color-timing … and the sound teams, led by supervising sound editors Scott Millan and Daniel Saxlid, have been hard at work for months," Rymsza stated.

It was reported earlier this month that automated dialogue replacement (ADR), or looping, was underway.

Rymsza listed the participation of Daniel Saxlid, a dialogue supervisor who has worked on several Hollywood blockbusters. He also noted the addition to the post-production team of colorist Mike Sowa, who has worked on big screen offerings, television series and  Read the rest of this entry »

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On 3/21/2018 at 7:37 AM, Bogie56 said:

Netflix vs. Cannes: Streamer Gets Cuaron’s “Roma”

In a surprise twist, Netflix has picked up “Gravity” and “Children of Men” director Alfonso Cuaron’s new film “Roma” reports Vanity Fair. The film follows a middle-class family in 1970s Mexico City and ties into The Corpus Christi Massacre in which student demonstrators were killed by elite Mexican soldiers.

The news comes right before the announcement next week of the Cannes Film Festival line-up for this year where “Roma” was likely to be one of the major potential candidates to screen in competition. However, with the war between Netflix and Cannes escalating, this will no doubt be seen as a potential ‘strike back’ by the streaming giant against festival organisers.

Following last year’s screenings of both “Okja” and “The Meyerowitz Stories,” and the ensuing controversy that came of it, the festival has now instituted a new rule requiring films screening in competition to have to commit to a regular theatrical release in France – effectively blocking Netflix original films from qualifying (films screened theatrically in France legally can’t be released on streaming services for three years).

As a result, Netflix threatened a boycott and has now not only snatched up one of the potential crown jewels of this year’s festival, but is threatening to hold back both it and four other high-profile films which were set to appear – Paul Greengrass’ “Norway,” Jeremy Saulnier’s “Hold the Dark,” Morgan Neville’s documentary “They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead” and the long in the works remaster and reconstruction of Orson Welles’ unfinished “The Other Side of the Wind”.

The battle is seen as a microcosm of the larger industry fight for the future of not only cinematic exhibition but the entire film industry itself. Conversations are reportedly taking part between the festival and the streaming service to resolve the impasse, but a final decision won’t be made until Cannes announces its official lineup on April 12th.

As for “Roma,” the release plans aren’t clear yet but, with the exception of an awards-qualifying theatrical run in the United States, it looks like it won’t be screened anywhere else theatrically – though may try for a Fall festival run.

http://www.darkhorizons.com/netflix-vs-cannes-streamer-gets-cuarons-roma/

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While I bow at the altar of Orson, And I know very little about this film, I kind of can't help but wonder if it might not disappoint if it sees the light of day. 

 I base part of this on the fact that John Huston is the lead ( at least according to billing ). I love John Huston is an actor. I love John Huston as a director. That said- during the 1970s, he appeared in some baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaad movies ( although his work in Chinatown more than makes up for them. )

I'm hoping for the best, but who knows. 

(All that said, the great unreleased masterwork of our time as far as I'm concerned will always be THE DAY THE CLOWN CRIED)

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If anyone is interested this is a PARTIAL synopsis of the plot of THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND (as per WIKIPEDIA.) [BOLDING AT THE END IS MINE]

Sounds, um,

...

...

Well, just read for yourselves:

Plot

The film features John Huston as Jake Hannaford, an aging Hollywood director modeled on Ernest Hemingway. The film opens with narration over the wreckage of Hannaford's crashed car, casting doubt as to whether the crash which killed him on his 70th birthday was really an accident. The narrator sets the tone for the film by telling us "This [film] was put together from many sources—from all that footage shot by the TV and documentary film-makers—and also the students, critics and young directors who happened to bring sixteen and eight millimeter cameras to his birthday party …" Just before his death, Hannaford was trying to revive his flagging career by making a "hip, with-it" film in the style of Antonioni, laden with gratuitous sex scenes and violence, with mixed results. At the time of Hannaford's party, this film (The Other Side of the Wind) has been left unfinished after its star stormed off the set, for reasons not immediately apparent to the audience. The film includes extensive excerpts of this film-within-a-film, as well as excerpts of a documentary on Hannaford's life.

After the titles, we see a screening of some incomprehensible parts of Hannaford's unfinished experimental film. The screening is being held to attract "end money" from clearly unimpressed studio boss Max David (Geoffrey Land). Hannaford himself is absent, and a loyal member of his entourage, the aging former child star Billy Boyle (Norman Foster) makes an inept attempt to describe what the film is about. David asks, "Jake is just making this up as he goes along, isn't he?" After an awkward pause, Boyle can only reply, "He's done it before." Intercut with this scene, we see various groups setting out for Hannaford's 70th birthday party at his Arizona ranch, including Hannaford and his young protégé Brooks Otterlake (played by Peter Bogdanovich), a young, commercially successful director with a talent for mimicking celebrities. (Bogdanovich, then a successful young director, also has a talent for mimicry.) One of the people they share their car with is the obnoxious cineaste reporter Mr. Pister (Joseph McBride), whose flurry of intrusive questions culminates in, "Mr. Hannaford, in the body of your film work, how significantly would you relate the trauma of your father's suicide?" and he is thrown out of Hannaford's car.

Stranded in the desert, Pister hitches a lift on a bus that is taking crew and reporters to Hannaford's birthday party. Although there are many journalists in the bus, they are also carrying several dozen life-size clay dolls of Hannaford's leading man, taken from the set of the unfinished film. The scene is indicative of the experimental nature of the picture, and includes much overlapping dialogue: a tape recorder belonging to reporter Juliette Riche (Susan Strasberg) playing back Hannaford's voice, while a member of Hannaford's entourage Pat (Edmond O'Brien) reads out an authoritarian anti-hippy diatribe of Hannaford's, fellow reporter Pister struggles to thread the tape back onto his reel-to-reel tape recorder, and at the same time, film footage of the scene is rapidly intercut with footage from Hannaford's film. Further scenes depict the festivities at Hannaford's party, including fireworks, assorted midgets, and a musical number with John Carroll leading a rendition of "The Glow-Worm".

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There hasn't been much success for those taking over and completing Welles' films in the past. Will this be any different?

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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

There hasn't been much success for those taking over and completing Welles' films in the past. Will this be any different?

Well I would point to the well mounted posthumost restoration per Welles' editing notes of Touch of Evil to argue that this isn't always the case.  Jess Franco's mess of Welles' Don Quixote is the flip side.  Franco perhaps made what he could of the footage available to him at the time.  And of course he had no access to any of the actors.  But I hear even Don Quixote may get another try as more footage from a separate collection has apparently become available.

The Other Side of the Wind is getting a royal treatment from Frank Marshall, Peter Bogdanovich and Netflix.  And they are putting a bunch of money into post.  As we know, Welles liked to redo lots of his dialogue in post.  That may no longer be an option as most of the cast are deceased.  It probably would be best not to expect too too much as the project was akin to weekend filmmaking.  Welles would film a bit here and there when he had the money and access to his cast.  He did much the same thing with Othello and that film is a masterpiece IMO.  Fans should seek out the new blu ray as it includes Welles' own Filming Othello which shows you what he was up against doing that film.  How many films have two actors speaking to one another in a scene where the reverse shots are done in a different continent?

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The Other Side of the Wind is getting a royal treatment from Frank Marshall, Peter Bogdanovich and Netflix.

Hearing Pete Bogdanovich is on the project is a big boost for a satisfactory end result. I'm currently reading Bogdanovich's 1992 book of interviews with Welles where all his unfinished projects are discussed in detail. Bogdanovich knew Welles pretty closely, plus his experience & talent make him the only choice to complete Welles' vision.

Here's hoping for the best....

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33 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

The Other Side of the Wind is getting a royal treatment from Frank Marshall, Peter Bogdanovich and Netflix.

Hearing Pete Bogdanovich is on the project is a big boost for a satisfactory end result. I'm currently reading Bogdanovich's 1992 book of interviews with Welles where all his unfinished projects are discussed in detail. Bogdanovich knew Welles pretty closely, plus his experience & talent make him the only choice to complete Welles' vision.

Here's hoping for the best....

Is the book This Is Orson Welles?  If so, it has a pretty good reconstruction of the lost scenes of The Magnificent Ambersons.

This is just a guess, but judging by the few bits I have seen from The Other Side of the Wind it may have the feel and style of chaos akin to that of The Trial.  Not to all tastes.  You can see flashes of that in Touch of Evil as well. So to some it may come across as a 'mess.'  It may require repeated viewing to appreciate it!

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Is the book This Is Orson Welles?

Yes that's the book.
Heh, I didn't know Welles directed THE TRIAL! (just finished the KANE sections in the book)

I once caught THE TRIAL on TCM about 5 minutes in and was hooked by Anthony Perkins. What an incredible actor he was. Loved the movie- thought it was superior to the book- but saw it so long ago, I don't recall much about it. It struck me as having an artsy-fartsy pompous air to it, but fun in a stagey play sort of way.

(A positive aspect of having severe memory loss is every movie eventually becomes a "new" movie. Often all that's retained is the emotional impression)
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9 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Is the book This Is Orson Welles?

Yes that's the book.
Heh, I didn't know Welles directed THE TRIAL! (just finished the KANE sections in the book)

I once caught THE TRIAL on TCM about 5 minutes in and was hooked by Anthony Perkins. What an incredible actor he was. Loved the movie- thought it was superior to the book- but saw it so long ago, I don't recall much about it. It struck me as having an artsy-fartsy pompous air to it, but fun in a stagey play sort of way.

(A positive aspect of having severe memory loss is every movie eventually becomes a "new" movie. Often all that's retained is the emotional impression)

Thanks Gloria, I never was one to avoid taking a few artsy-fartsy chances. Especially when a giant like Welles (or Hitch) was directing.
BTW, I thought you were pretty incredible too, back in the day! You remember, when you were "big" before the pictures became too "small."
But I think that extramarital relationship with Joe K. senior may have way-layed your stardom! That is until Billy dusted off the cobwebs and brought you back into the limelight with Bill.

"Often all that's retained is the emotional impression" that sometimes happens when one is high as well...
Whenever I see that "smoking" avatar of yours, makes me want to ask you for a hit... ;):)

Seriously, though, I have known a few persons with "memory loss" and their care givers. There was this one "young" lady, with such a marvelous sense of humor.
She always uplifted my day sharing little anecdotes about taking care of her husband at home who was experiencing early Alzheimer's and dementia.
She would share that he always laughed at her jokes as if he were hearing them for the very first time. And he always had something funny (intentional or not) to say, that made her laugh in turn, with him...
Going places or seeing anything with him was always like sharing a new experience.
And making love was always like the first time... only better!
He was a great guy, and despite his memory deficit, still possessed the wonderful good nature that she fell in-love with.
Their kids (all adults or late teens) still got a kick out of their dad, and he was a joy to be around.
I know that is far from the case with most... But her positive, always more than half-full attitude was quite refreshing! :)

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This from Wellesnet.com ....

Frank Marshall: ‘The Other Side of the Wind’ to have theatrical release

May 28, 2018 

marshall

Orson Welles, far right, in 1971, filming Oja Kodar in The Other Side of the Wind with production manager Frank Marshall (with slate) and cameraman Gary Graver. (Jose Castellvi | Royal Road Entertainment photo)

Orson Welles' The Other Side of the Wind will have a theatrical release, in addition to streaming on Netflix, according to one of its producers.

In a series of Memorial Day weekend tweets, producer Frank Marshall noted that "the film that will bookend Orson's amazing body of work, THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND, photographed by Gary Graver, will be coming soon!"

Asked if there would be a theatrical release, Marshall tweetedenthusiastically, "YES!!!"

(He was asked, and ignored, a query as to whether "soon" meant before the Telluride Film Festival in September.)

While Netflix has not announced any plans for a theatrical release, producer Filip Jan Rymsza told Wellesnet more than a year ago that the agreement he and Marshall reached with the streaming giant  called for producers to deliver, among other elements, a 35mm print of the completed film, which seemingly left the door open to a theatrical release. 

Netflix has not yet been revealed when, or where, The Other Side of the Wind will have its much-anticipated debut.

It was to have debuted earlier this month at the Cannes Film Festival, but that was scrubbed after a squabble between festival organisers and Netflix.

Post-production sound work was completed in April on the reportedly 117-minute film, which Welles shot between 1970 and 1976.

The Other Side of the Wind  takes place at the 70th birthday party of maverick director Jake Hannaford (John Huston), who is struggling to complete his comeback film during the rise of  New Hollywood. Attending the party are successful young directors, like Brooks Otterlake (Peter Bogdanovich), hangers-on and critics. Hannaford dies at the conclusion of the party. Welles' movie recounts Hannaford's final hours using a mix of 16mm and 35mm color and black-and-white film shot at the party, along with scenes from his unfinished movie.

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the subject matter sounds to me uninteresting like a cinema verite exercise in Hollywood egocentricity.

Death of a Scoundrel Hollywood style.

Image result for death of a scoundrel george sanders

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