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The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

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Bad for Each Other is so doggone dry.  Heston and Liz's attraction to one another is exciting but it's merely temporary.  I have the film in a film noir collection but I certainly do not consider it film noir.

 

it could end up entertaining me a lot.  i like soapy dramas.


 


Are you talking about Jack Webb?  Was he involved with Blues in the Night?

 

sorry, i am mixing it up with Pete Kelly's Blues.

 


The pacing for Counsellor at Law is breathtaking.  It really makes the film.  The transformation of George Simon (John Barrymore) is impressive.  How the film incorporates multiple storylines is tremendous.  It's a very unique film.

 

I think so, too. I really love early Wyler.

 

 

I'm trying to remember if you, I mean, Joan slapped the King.  I'm sure she did.  I almost always like Gable in a comedic role.  He was at his best in Forsaking All Others.  Despite the presence of Joan Crawford and Robert Montgomery, it's his film, really.  Gable really yukked it up in the film, too.  He was on overdrive.  He was a treat to watch.

 

I'm surprised you'd enjoy such 1930s comedy.  Have you seen Merrily We Live yet?

 

Why?  The Gold Rush is simply perfection to me. 

 

I never think of you liking silent films.  I know you love 3 Bad Men, but I'm not sure what else.

 

Chaplin is a big exception.  I've liked all of his movies, except maybe the last few.  I still need to watch A Woman of Paris.

 

You seem to like a group of strangers being held captive more so than families.  Am I right about that? 

 

I never thought about it that way but yes, since it's more likely that strangers will be so different from each other, and they have the challenge of coming together (as a "family") or maybe losing their lives.

 

I can see how you wouldn't go for this Garfield.  He's on the crazed side.  I see him as a wounded animal, though.  He's lacking the love of anyone, most especially his mother.  And that's why I liked the film.  The ending is wonderful.

 

Yes, I prefer him less hard edged but I agree about the ending, it's hard to watch though, considering the reality behind it.

 

I still cannot believe you like Idiot's Delight.  It must be solely due to Gable's being a song and dance man.

 

Believe it or not it's because of Norma!  I told you I suddenly found myself laughing at her ridiculous impersonation.  I just don't like the serious turn of events.  I am glad Gable avoided musicals, ha.

 

 

Ha!  I cannot get over Richard Burton playing the Indian doctor.  Unbelievable.

 

I'm sure Elizabeth never let him forget it. :D

 

That's a good observation about The Search.  I've never seen Montgomery Clift play such a character, either.  I never picture him being "fatherly".  He's good.  I like Monty.

 

I like him there, too and because it is so unusual for him.  The reluctant father.  he's already very comfortable in front of the camera (apparently).

 

 

Are you saying you thought Charles Boyer and Irene Dunne were past their prime or just too old for you to fall for their comedic romance?  Since she was a widow, I thought it worked.

 

No, I just feel like in an earlier time the pacing might have been more crisp.  It felt a bit slower the way many 40s comedies tend to seem with me.

 

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Ciao, Pappy's Girl -- it could end up entertaining me a lot.  i like soapy dramas.

 

I like soapy, too!  It's just Bad for Each Other isn't that good.

 


sorry, i am mixing it up with Pete Kelly's Blues.

 

Oh!  That's one I haven't seen.  Is it any good?

 

I think so, too. I really love early Wyler.

 

What do you like about early-Wyler more so than later-Wyler?

 

I'm surprised you'd enjoy such 1930s comedy.  Have you seen Merrily We Live yet?

 

When you asked the question, I hadn't seen that film.  But I have since watched it. :)

 

Chaplin is a big exception.  I've liked all of his movies, except maybe the last few.  I still need to watch A Woman of Paris.

 

I can't see you liking A Woman of Paris since it's a serious drama

 

I never thought about it that way but yes, since it's more likely that strangers will be so different from each other, and they have the challenge of coming together (as a "family") or maybe losing their lives.

 

That's right.  And that's why I also enjoy those kind of "captive" films.  The family "captive" films tend to be lesser for me.

 

Believe it or not it's because of Norma!  I told you I suddenly found myself laughing at her ridiculous impersonation.  I just don't like the serious turn of events.  I am glad Gable avoided musicals, ha.

 

That's truly stunning!  I find Norma to be so darn annoying once she turns "Russian".  I actually liked some of the serious moments the best, but it all didn't fit together, to me.

 

I'm sure Elizabeth never let him forget it. :D

 

Poor Richard!

 

I like him there, too and because it is so unusual for him.  The reluctant father.  he's already very comfortable in front of the camera (apparently).

 

You are right, Montgomery Clift sure did seem at ease right from the start of his career.  And that's what makes his post-accident screen appearances difficult to watch.  It's night and day.

 

No, I just feel like in an earlier time the pacing might have been more crisp.  It felt a bit slower the way many 40s comedies tend to seem with me.

 

That's interesting.  I loved the charm of Together Again.  I liked how Anne (Irene Dunne) came out of her shell at the urging of her father-in-law (Charles Coburn) and then the love of George (Charles Boyer).

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*Sunset Blvd*

 

*rohanaka says: What a disturbing movie. To me its almost kinda like driving past a train wreck, ha. You know you SHOULD look away, but you just can't. :D I have not seen it in a long while, but I do recall being very intrigued by how it was all going to play out (given you know at least ONE of the characters' outcomes before it even starts) Will be interested in hearing what you thought of this one.*

 

"Disturbing" is a good word for it. I actually found myself feeling sorry for Norma (Gloria Swanson). There was a lot of sadness to be found with her. I ended up not liking Joe (William Holden) because of how he viewed Norma. But he did come to feel for her. I'll give him that.

 

YO! Grey Dude..

 

I hope it is not too late to chime back in on your recent list. I had to go back a bit to find where we started gabbing on this one in particular. There has been a lot going on (in real life, as well as here too, what with the whole re-vamping of the message board and all) since you first published your list.

 

But I wanted to make a point of going back to find where we first started to talk on it, if only to tell you that I found a copy of this at the library the other day and brought it home because it has been such a good long while since last I saw it, that I wanted to watch again before I answered  you.

 

And I have to say, I  was NOT surprised at all to see you rate it so high when you posted your list in order. ha. I was expecting it would be one that you would enjoy.  Ha.. even with MY track record, that one was a pretty easy guess. ha.)  It has a "noir' feel to it in some respects, with a very flawed  set of characters to be intrigued by. And a really "twisty twisted (almost gut-wrenching) plot with even some surprisingly emotional aspects to it as well.

 

I can't HONESTLY tell you it is an all-time favorite movie for me. But I have to confess, I don't dislike it either. I have to say that it HAS always caught my attention the few times I have seen it. (Again.. it's a very disturbing story and I will also restate it's a bit like a trainwreck. ha. You can't look away.. you just have to watch) And so I put it in TO watch it last night.. but it was a bit too late in the evening, and I did not get finished re-watching it this time yet. (What can I say.. it was getting late and I am getting old.. ha. So I couldn't stay up to finish it.. but will do that tonight.)

 

So  I guess for now, you'll have to forgive me for being late to the party.. and in the meantime, I will just say, OH that NORMA.. ha. I forgot how MUCH (so very, very.... VERY MUCH) she creeps me out. ha.

 

OH my goodness me.(And yet.. having said that..  at the same time.. I totally can understand why you found her somewhat sympathetic... did I mention the plot was twisty twisted? Ha.) Oh my goodness me indeed. 

 

I will look forward to being creeped out all over again tonight to finish this up and will hope we can have a bit of a chat on what in the WORLD made that ole gal tick ha. 

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What??? Wait.. Norma was (gasp) FIFTY???????????????????????????????????????  :o  Say it isn't SO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ha. (surely she was older.. it must have been an error in the script or SOMETHING, ha. Please tell me she was older, ha. I have been fifty for a while now.. I can take it. .and I am not usually one to get too caught up in vanity, as a rule.. ha. but AGH! I hope I don't look as old as Norma! ha.) :D  Agh! fifty??? (gulp.. really??) :D

 

I ended up not liking Joe (William Holden) because of how he viewed Norma. But he did come to feel for her. I'll give him that.

 

And after watching it all again, I will say that I can maybe see why you would say that, because ultimately he just wasn't ALL that likable. And yes.. Norma could be very sympathetic sometimes. She was also vain, egotistical, manipulating, vindictive.. and desperate.  So it was hard to get too "wooshy" eyed for her overall. I DID feel very  sorry for her after the New Year's Eve party. I think that had to be when she was the most sympathetic of all. But I think she knew how to "play the victim" too. Her "fake" suicide attempts were more about drama.. and she knew that her "faithful" circle of people would continue to fawn all over her and make her feel better. So SOME of that crying was for show. But that one part.. (the new year's eve scene) that one was different. I really do think she was about as broken as she could be thinking he was not going to stay with her. 

 

And that is likely what broke Joe down too. Because he DID come to care about what happened to her. And even though I don't think he STAYED because he loved her.. I think he did have pity on her and eventually he cared about her enough to want to spare her feelings when she might be hurt by those who were going to treat her as an old, out of favor, has-been.  At least he seemed to care for her that way..  before she pushed him too far, that is.

 

And I have to say, that pretty much throughout the story, he didn't LIKE what he'd allowed her to turn him into as well. I'll say again.. he wasn't an overtly likable guy. He had a lot of weakness in h im and  LET her "adopt" him. But he didn't just roll over for it. He did protest a little.. and I think it wasn't a false sort of protest. He just didn't have enough "guts" to back it  up. If he'd had more backbone, and if his wallet wasn't hurting him as bad as it was, he'd not have let it go anywhere with her. (of course.. if he were THAT sort of guy, he'd have never ended up parking his car in the garage and going into that house in the first place, ha  And they'd  have had to pick a different street name to call the movie, wouldn't they?? ha.) .

 

But I guess I am just saying.. even if he was weak, he wasn't a money grabber like some folks would have been. Even after he'd given in, he fought the image.. but he just wasn't strong enough to stand up and walk away. He let her give him want he wanted: comfort and a lack of worry over money.  But he did not really enjoy it. And I don't think he ever once set out to "take her" for what he could get. He just didn't fight hard enough to keep her from GIVING him what she wanted to (in order to entice him to stay.)  He was being kept by her, but he really (really) hated it when others KNEW and assumed that he was "ok" with playing the role he'd been given when she took charge of his life. He didn't set out to end up the way he did.. he sort of fell into it, and then was too weak to let himself have enough (as my dad used to call it) "personal pride" to not live like that. .

 

SPOILER ALERT:

 

And I have to say, he gets major points from me the way he spares Betty from Norma hurting her. Once he saw what was going to happen the first time he tried to step out and  have his own life, he realized the only way to stop it was to put his foot down hard. So he hurt Betty himself.. but he thought it was for her own good. If he sent her packing, Norma wouldn't be able to do anything to hurt her. So he made himself as ugly as possible and chased Betty away. In his mind, he was doing her a kindness. Even if it LOOKED like he was being unkind.

 

And then I liked how he made up his mind enough was enough and got himself ready to leave Norma in the dust. It was long overdue. He just wasn't able to make it past the patio, though. (poor guy). He underestimated the fact that he was not only dealing with a TOTAL crazy woman.. but a total crazy woman with a GUN. (those two don't ever mix well, if movies like this are any indication, ha) 

 

Correction.. agh! A FIFTY year old total crazy woman with a gun. (REALLY???????????) I still say there must have been SOME sort of typo in the script when they wrote THAT part. ha. :P

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Good evening, Quiet Gal -- I hope it is not too late to chime back in on your recent list. I had to go back a bit to find where we started gabbing on this one in particular. There has been a lot going on (in real life, as well as here too, what with the whole re-vamping of the message board and all) since you first published your list.

 

My movie watching has slowed to a crawl this month.  Too much competition.

 

 

And I have to say, I  was NOT surprised at all to see you rate it so high when you posted your list in order. ha. I was expecting it would be one that you would enjoy.  Ha.. even with MY track record, that one was a pretty easy guess. ha.)  It has a "noir' feel to it in some respects, with a very flawed  set of characters to be intrigued by. And a really "twisty twisted (almost gut-wrenching) plot with even some surprisingly emotional aspects to it as well.

 

Sunset Blvd. is indeed all of that.  And, as I said, I found myself feeling for Norma (Gloria Swanson).  I would have never expected that.  I guess I feel there's a real sadness to a person being pushed aside and forgotten.

 

I can't HONESTLY tell you it is an all-time favorite movie for me. But I have to confess, I don't dislike it either. I have to say that it HAS always caught my attention the few times I have seen it. (Again.. it's a very disturbing story and I will also restate it's a bit like a trainwreck. ha. You can't look away.. you just have to watch) And so I put it in TO watch it last night.. but it was a bit too late in the evening, and I did not get finished re-watching it this time yet. (What can I say.. it was getting late and I am getting old.. ha. So I couldn't stay up to finish it.. but will do that tonight.)

 

It's not a great favorite of mine, either.  It didn't crack my top 50 of film noir.

 

So  I guess for now, you'll have to forgive me for being late to the party.. and in the meantime, I will just say, OH that NORMA.. ha. I forgot how MUCH (so very, very.... VERY MUCH) she creeps me out. ha.

 

What creeps you out about her?  And you're not late to the party.  You were at the party before me!

 

What??? Wait.. Norma was (gasp) FIFTY???????????????????????????????????????  :o  Say it isn't SO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ha. (surely she was older.. it must have been an error in the script or SOMETHING, ha. Please tell me she was older, ha. I have been fifty for a while now.. I can take it. .and I am not usually one to get too caught up in vanity, as a rule.. ha. but AGH! I hope I don't look as old as Norma! ha.) :D  Agh! fifty??? (gulp.. really??) :D

 

:D  Gloria was that age, as well.  But I always think folks aged quicker in the old days.  I have no idea why that is, either.  Guys will look like they are 50 when they are 35 or 75 when they are 60.  And 50 for a woman in Hollywood is like being 80.

 

And after watching it all again, I will say that I can maybe see why you would say that, because ultimately he just wasn't ALL that likable. And yes.. Norma could be very sympathetic sometimes. She was also vain, egotistical, manipulating, vindictive.. and desperate.  So it was hard to get too "wooshy" eyed for her overall.

 

She was all of that, for sure.  Yet, I still felt for her.  I guess it's because I feel it's really tough to see a somebody no longer being that, even if they think they are.  There was a great deal of loneliness with her and I always find that tragic.

 

I DID feel very sorry for her after the New Year's Eve party. I think that had to be when she was the most sympathetic of all.

 

That's when I really started to have feelings for her, just as Joe (William Holden) did.

 

But I think she knew how to "play the victim" too. Her "fake" suicide attempts were more about drama.. and she knew that her "faithful" circle of people would continue to fawn all over her and make her feel better. So SOME of that crying was for show. But that one part.. (the new year's eve scene) that one was different. I really do think she was about as broken as she could be thinking he was not going to stay with her. 

 

Well, she's an actress, so there is going to be a lot of drama with her.  She's also used to being the center of attention.  For a woman to lose this through aging is tough.  And this is a huge selling point for me with Sunset Blvd..  I feel it's a terrific film about aging.  To see Norma trying to look as she did when she was younger speaks volumes about Woman and her struggles in our society.  It's rather heartbreaking.

 

And that is likely what broke Joe down too. Because he DID come to care about what happened to her. And even though I don't think he STAYED because he loved her.. I think he did have pity on her and eventually he cared about her enough to want to spare her feelings when she might be hurt by those who were going to treat her as an old, out of favor, has-been.  At least he seemed to care for her that way..  before she pushed him too far, that is.

 

I also believe Joe cared for Norma and he was protecting her for a while.  But he also wanted to be his own man, not a kept one.  He wanted to live his own life.

 

And I have to say, that pretty much throughout the story, he didn't LIKE what he'd allowed her to turn him into as well. I'll say again.. he wasn't an overtly likable guy. He had a lot of weakness in h im and  LET her "adopt" him. But he didn't just roll over for it. He did protest a little.. and I think it wasn't a false sort of protest. He just didn't have enough "guts" to back it  up. If he'd had more backbone, and if his wallet wasn't hurting him as bad as it was, he'd not have let it go anywhere with her. (of course.. if he were THAT sort of guy, he'd have never ended up parking his car in the garage and going into that house in the first place, ha  And they'd  have had to pick a different street name to call the movie, wouldn't they?? ha.) .

 

It's not a matter of strong or weak that makes me like or dislike Joe.  I tend to like weak men more than strong ones, typically.  What bothered me about Joe was that I thought he was mostly a jerk.  He was in line with society's view of Norma being a has-been nut.  He thought poorly of her and was merely humoring her, seeing her as easy money.  He eventually started to feel for her, though.

 

But I guess I am just saying.. even if he was weak, he wasn't a money grabber like some folks would have been. Even after he'd given in, he fought the image.. but he just wasn't strong enough to stand up and walk away. He let her give him want he wanted: comfort and a lack of worry over money.  But he did not really enjoy it. And I don't think he ever once set out to "take her" for what he could get. He just didn't fight hard enough to keep her from GIVING him what she wanted to (in order to entice him to stay.)  He was being kept by her, but he really (really) hated it when others KNEW and assumed that he was "ok" with playing the role he'd been given when she took charge of his life. He didn't set out to end up the way he did.. he sort of fell into it, and then was too weak to let himself have enough (as my dad used to call it) "personal pride" to not live like that. .

 

Yes, I agree with all of that.  Joe was desperate to start.  Then he fatefully wandered into some easy money and he had it made.  But then he started to fall in love and his existence became a serious embarrassment and a hindrance to pursuing his love.  And I must say, there are some of us around who selfishly live a way of life that is only suitable for one.  If you end up having feelings for another, it can really make one's way of life come into question.  That's what happened to Joe.  If it wasn't for Betty (Nancy Olson), he probably would have just kept on living as he was.  But I'm sure he'd eventually want his freedom and maybe some personal pride.

 

SPOILER

 

And I have to say, he gets major points from me the way he spares Betty from Norma hurting her. Once he saw what was going to happen the first time he tried to step out and  have his own life, he realized the only way to stop it was to put his foot down hard. So he hurt Betty himself.. but he thought it was for her own good. If he sent her packing, Norma wouldn't be able to do anything to hurt her. So he made himself as ugly as possible and chased Betty away. In his mind, he was doing her a kindness. Even if it LOOKED like he was being unkind.

 

Excellent point.  Joe was very honorable in that situation.  And I always appreciate it when a man saves a woman from himself.  It always hurts to see and do.

 

And then I liked how he made up his mind enough was enough and got himself ready to leave Norma in the dust. It was long overdue. He just wasn't able to make it past the patio, though. (poor guy). He underestimated the fact that he was not only dealing with a TOTAL crazy woman.. but a total crazy woman with a GUN. (those two don't ever mix well, if movies like this are any indication, ha) 

 

I still don't view Norma as crazy yet I know she is.  It's the loneliness she lives with and her need to be a star again that really make me feel for her, even understand her.

 

Correction.. agh! A FIFTY year old total crazy woman with a gun. (REALLY???????????) I still say there must have been SOME sort of typo in the script when they wrote THAT part. ha.

 

You go around with a frozen rope!

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Well hello there, Mr. Grey. 

 

Hey.. who is that up there in the tree in your avatar?? The pic is so small I can't tell. Is that Mr. Scratch??? Let me go get bake a peach pie and trick him to come on down.. then I'll get ole Dan'l Webster to give him the boot! HA. 

 

Too much competition

 

Sport season taking all your viewing time??? I know it is a busy time for you. 

 

there's a real sadness to a person being pushed aside and forgotten

 

Oh there absolutely is. I completely agree. And if she had been written even a LITTLE bit differently.. I think I would have had even MORE sympathy for her than I did. Because I DID have some feeling of sadness to see her being passed over by the changing times. Did you notice the big microphone passing over her head and bumping into her.. just another "nudge" of fate that she'd been replaced. And yet, she DID still have a following. Those former co-workers and fans had NOT forgotten her. And that COULD have been enough for some folks.. and I think if she had not fought the changing of the times and went with the flow (like SOME silent stars managed to do with the passing of time) maybe she'd have been able to take her lot in life a little more easily.. a little more gradually. Rather than waking up one day to find out you're hot.. and then the next day you're not.  She just thought she deserved better. She thought she was too important to be passed by. But she forgot that time waits for no one, not even Norma Desmond. And if she didn't move with it.. she'd be stuck in a rut.. and nobody but Max was going to want to be stuck with her.

 

I guess I am saying.. that while I DO feel badly for her in some respects, by clinging to the past instead of just trying to live her life one day to the next and moving forward from there,  she sort of created her own circumstances. She loved being the object of worship by so many adoring fans.. rather than actually trying to just love LIFE (by living it to the fullest, day after day) So she more or less hurt herself.  

 

I call this the "Elvis" syndrome ha.  Its never a good idea to start believing your own press. Once  you think all the wonderful things you hear about yourself are REAL and not just the image you are putting out there for people paying you money.. you will fall victim to the folly of thinking  you really ARE as wonderful as everyone says you are and that you deserve to be loved and adored just for being YOU. 

 

It's an ugly way to live. And it makes YOU ugly too.. even if you did not start out that way. 

 

So that is why I had a harder time feeling a WHOLE lot of sympathy for her. Yes. she was pitiful.. and I DID pity her. But that is not exactly the same as maybe sympathizing with her over her lot in life. It was sad.. it was tragic.. but a lot of it was her own doing. 

 

What creeps you out about her?

 

Ha.. she was a loon! (I would have LOVED to have known the back story about that monkey, ha.. and then again.. I am sure it is just another part of the whole creepy package that was NORMA.) The comparison with the house and Miss Havisham was pretty spot on.. and to me the house sort of extends to Norma. She was sort of "frozen in time" too. She was trying to keep her life from moving forward by convincing herself that only her OWN reality was real. Her makeup and the way she dressed and her mannerisms.. ugh.. she just could not give up the silent era spotlight.. even after it had long-since gone out. She was just way over the top. And I have to say that Gloria Swanson really (really, really) did a wonderful job portraying her that way. I don't KNOW if she was as creepy as Norma in the way she lived and dressed and carried herself. ha.. but I could BELIEVE she was just by watching her in this role. Agh! 

 

 

And 50 for a woman in Hollywood is like being 80.

 

Ha..then I am staying away from THAT place forever!! ha. All kidding aside, I know what you mean about how folks seem OLDER than they do now. (even Betty saying she was 22 I was like.. NO way! ha.) I think ever generation thinks the one in front of it is ANCIENT. ha. I know my mom and dad HAD to be ever so much "older" at fifty than I am now. (yeah.. I'll just keep telling myself THAT one, ha) 

 

Well, she's an actress, so there is going to be a lot of drama with her.  She's also used to being the center of attention.  For a woman to lose this through aging is tough.  And this is a huge selling point for me with Sunset Blvd..  I feel it's a terrific film about aging. 

 

I don't know. I don't see it about "aging" so much as I do about just trying to hold back the hands of time.. and wanting to recapture the attention and the limelight.

 

To see Norma trying to look as she did when she was younger speaks volumes about Woman and her struggles in our society.  It's rather heartbreaking.  

 

It was sad.. but not just because she was trying to be "young" again. Its not like she is the "typical" fifty year old woman with life passing her by. She wanted the camera.. she wanted to cling to her fans.. she wanted to have all that attention just like she remembered it. And it was over. She had let herself become deluded and she did it in a big way I think she felt she deserved to be  young forever because someone as wonderful as she thought she was could simply defy time itself . So yeah.. maybe it was a little bit about "aging" but more about a refusal to look at reality and just be a real person in a changing world (and not try to hang onto her lost STARDOM) no matter her age.

 

It's not a matter of strong or weak that makes me like or dislike Joe.  I tend to like weak men more than strong ones, typically.  What bothered me about Joe was that I thought he was mostly a jerk.  He was in line with society's view of Norma being a has-been nut.  He thought poorly of her and was merely humoring her, seeing her as easy money.  He eventually started to feel for her, though.

 

And see. I don't think he saw her as easy money. (at least not in the way I think you are saying it) He did not set out to take her for anything at all. He walked into the wrong place at the wrong time.. and he sort of fell into a situation that he didn't even realize he was in.. until he was in it. He thought it would be a quick writing job (once he did agree to write for her) and make a few bucks and move on. (and meanwhile. maybe he would be able to keep his car away from the repo guys) He didn't look to take her for her money.. at least not for anything but writing.. but she kept throwing it at him. Every time he tried to move away from her, he kept getting snagged by her grabbing him and pulling him in. (sometimes literally.. she would reach over and pull him closer to her)  He put up a few protests..and he even tried to break away (on New Years Eve) but she kept reeling him back in. That is why his weakness was such an issue. He didn't have the backbone to stand up and tell her thanks but no thanks.. and mean it. Until it was too late.. and then it really WAS just that..  TOO late. 

 

I still don't view Norma as crazy yet I know she is.  It's the loneliness she lives with and her need to be a star again that really make me feel for her, even understand her.

 

Oh my golly.. she was a total loon. ha. A creepy, manipulating, utterly self-absorbed nut-job. Yes.. I do feel sorry for her.. because I hate seeing anyone sink that low into the depths of "koo-koo" that way. But again.. I think she did it to herself by the way she loved the limelight and the attention TOO much. And Max thought he was doing her a kindness by "protecting her" and allowing her to KEEP that going. But he only made her WORSE and she completely lost her grasp on reality. Crazy doesn't even begin to cover it. 

 

You go around with a frozen rope

 

Yeah.. but that is only because.. well.. some folks need looking after. :D:P
 

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Hey.. who is that up there in the tree in your avatar?? The pic is so small I can't tell. Is that Mr. Scratch??? Let me go get bake a peach pie and trick him to come on down.. then I'll get ole Dan'l Webster to give him the boot! HA. 

 

Ro..... Scott (aka FrankGrimes, aka Mr. Grey and many others) needs to definitely work on his avatar. It is a poor excuse of a picture. Now I am NOT saying everyone should have an illustration like I have (at least I did draw it and it does look pretty cool if I might say) but a little work could be done to spruce his photo up, don't you think?

 

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I think it's an adorable image of Will Roger's as "Jubilo", a character Will played both in a silent version and in the sound version, Too Busy To Work, which is on DVD and which is my favorite of Will's non-Ford pictures.  I highly recommend it!  Ro, I especially think you would find this movie funny and touching.

 

Too%20Busy%20to%20Work.jpg

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Good eye, Miss G. Ha. I just couldn't tell. It sort of looked like Mr. Scratch, ha. so it was a total guess from me. The Will movie sounds like a fun movie though. I will make a point of looking for it. I have never even heard of that one. 

 

PS: Rey.. your Duke pic is a very nice rendition. 

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Woo! Cupcakes for everybody! Thirty years calls for something special!! Happy Anniversary to you and your lovely bride, Mr. Movieman! God bless you both!  

 

flower-flowercupcakes1_zps56310af0.jpg

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30 years of marriage?!  And I haven't even experienced 30 seconds of a relationship!  Here's to you and yours, Chris.  Happy Anniversary!  And many more happy years to come.

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30 years of marriage?!  And I haven't even experienced 30 seconds of a relationship!  Here's to you and yours, Chris.  Happy Anniversary!  And many more happy years to come.

 

Thanks, Scott. I wish you find someone and are as happy as The Bride and I are.

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Chris, congratulations on 30 years with your lovely Bride.  How wonderful! Yabba-dabba-dooo!

 

 

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Geez, it's been forever since I posted.

 

Well, here are the latest films that I have watched:

 

Annie Oakley (1935)

The Badlanders (1958)

The Big Bluff (1955)

Blockade (1938)

Body and Soul (1947)

Buried Alive (1939)

Charlie Chan in City in Darkness (1939)

Charlie Chan in Panama (1940)

The Conspirators (1944)

Count Three and Pray (1955)

A Cry in the Night (1956)

Daddy Long Legs (1955)

Devotion (1946)

Down to Earth (1932)

Experiment Perilous (1944)

Five (1951)

Gentleman's Agreement (1947)

Great Day in the Morning (1956)

Green Dolphin Street (1947)

The Headless Horseman (1922)

Ivy (1947)

I Was a Communist for the F.B.I. (1951)

Les Visiteurs du Soir (1942)

Lloyd's of London (1936)

Merrily We Live (1938)

Mirage (1965)

The Murder Man (1935)

Nobody Lives Forever (1946)

On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969)

Phffft (1954)

The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939)

Sea Devils (1937)

The Spy in Black (1939)

Terror in a Texas Town (1958)

The Texas Rangers (1936)

Three Coins in the Fountain (1954)

Three Strangers (1946)

Tortilla Flat (1942)

Two Smart People (1946)

Week-End at the Waldorf (1945)

Youth Runs Wild (1944)

 

Does anyone have any thoughts on any of these films?  Any favorites?

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Well it's about TIME you came out of hiding, Mr. Man in the Shadows, and posted another list. I was wondering if you had any new ones lately.  

 

But ha.. now after reading your list I have to confess I think this may be one of the most 'un-watched" (by me) bunches you've ever  had (and that is saying a lot because I don't usually have very many anyway, that I can say I have seen) But this batch is even more so. 

 

I can tell you I have seen Green Dolphin Street and don't remember hardly anything about it other than the REALLY intense earthquake scenes. As I recall they were very well done.. very impressive. As for the story.. I would really have to sit back and think long and hard to tell you much more about it. 

 

I have also at least seen the COVER of Texas Rangers.. ha. That is in that batch of four movies on the DVD that I own.. but I can't say for sure if I have seen it. (I think so.. but again.. it's been a good long while so it's anyone's guess at this point, ha) 

 

Ha.. golly.. I am no good to talk to at all. :D

 

Meanwhile, I will have to really comb over the rest of  your list and do some googling but none of the titles are jumping out at me.. so I guess this batch I will have to sit back and just read all about it. When you are ready to say more.. be sure to point out any that you think I will enjoy. :)

 

(woo hoo.. I am editing my post. I have also seen Count Three and Pray.. a long time ago, but I do remember it now. (Raymond Burr was the bad-guy, as I recall) Don't remember a whole lot except I do recall I liked it well enough.)

 

And have also seen Three Strangers.. but ha.. again, don't remember much.  (HA.. are you are getting tired of hearing this?) :D

 

I am sure, it was a good long while ago. As I recall it was so-so. It's not standing WAY on out for me (but I remember the creepy little statue, anyway) :D

Edited by rohanaka

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I  have Green Dolphin Street still on my DVR from ages ago and I will now get to it since it is on your list. I’ve just watched an early opera by Rossini entitled Equivico Stravagante which is a gorgeous way of saying “Colossal Mistake or Misunderstanding” or something close to that, and I thought of that just now seeing GDS on your list. Years ago I tried reading this rather long novel and didn’t get through it but I do believe I’ve seen this movie but much too long ago. It’s a good story. I seem to remember liking the earthy performance of Van H and feeling that Lana looked uncharistically drab, meaningless comments though, but I will look again, pleased to see that it is still on the DVR.

 

Hi Ro, you mentioned GDS, and also Three Strangers. Unfortunately, I don’t remember much of this last but I do remenber the premise of the story, fascinating indeed, and I love those SidneyG movies, especially if they have some of the other great ones who starred with him from time to time, this time Peter Lorre. But how to get a hold of this, ah, the library, I will look.

 

And Scott, I was looking (in vain, alas) for Les Visiteurs du Soir on this most current list because I recall you posting your intent to see that one.. Have you seen it yet? I just did and loved it. Some really astonishing great actors. Jules Berry practically runs away with the whole movie in the last half, wonderfully done. There are some other well-known actors of that period: Arletty, Fernand Ledoux (Anne’s father) and a wonderful actor named Marcel Herrand who has the demeanor and bearing of a Lawrence Olivier and who is extremely good  The actors who played Gilles and Anne are less familiar to me. I’ll say no more to avoid spoilers but if you’ve seen this I hope you comment or give me the go ahead and I’ll go first. Not a major ramble, just a few comments, but I want to hold off if you haven't as yet seen it. And if not, please do, I think it's quite good. I’m not necessarily at home with these cryptic and philisophical films by some of these great masters, I can enjoy them but the meanings don’t always jump out at me, ha. This one pleases mightily and with a terrific FIN. Another film of this ilk that I’m crazy about his Bergman’s The Seventh Seal, a similar look at ‘the other side’ if you will. Smiles of a Summer Night is another one, simply fabulous…but Bergman has an uneven appeal to me, some I don’t like at all, though well liked by others.

 

Thanks for posting, missing you and some of those other “missing” Ramblers (this upgrade took a toll on us), please excuse me if I wax wistful, remembering the golden times, rambler-wise.

:)

 

 

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Thanks for the list. Things have been kind of slow waiting on you to get the next batch. Unfortunately, this may be the lowest total I've seen of one of your lists. A few I saw years ago but don't remember enough to comment. 

 

Merrily We Live. It is funny. People may call it a poor man's My Man Godfrey but there is plenty to enjoy on its own. Billie Burke is a riot and Bonita Granville is quite endearing. Fine cast of Hal Roach support players. The scene of the father making it up the stairs while drunk caught The Bride so off guard that we had to stop the movie for her to compose herself. For us, it's a keeper.

 

The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex. Who wouldn't love Davis and Flynn? Knowing they weren't on each other's list of favorites adds to the fun. They are both quite good. The sets and costumes are impressive. 

 

On Her Majesty's Secret Service. A good Bond picture with some great action scenes and a wonderful Diana Rigg. People will argue over whether Lazenby was any good but, while he is no Connery - or any of the others - I think he does a fine job. A wonderful soundtrack and a real romance make this somewhat different and well worth the time. (I like it more than the preceding and following pictures.)

 

On to others that will have more to say.

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And Scott, I was looking (in vain, alas) for Les Visiteurs du Soir on this most current list because I recall you posting your intent to see that one.. Have you seen it yet? I just did and loved it.

 

Just for you, Laffite, I have gone back and added it to the list and will watch it in the next day or two.  I'm very curious about the film.  And your saying that you loved it makes me want to see it.

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Frank, I'm delighted that you saw Mirage, which I haven't seen in years but loved. One of the best 60s thrillers. Makes my top five for 1965.

 

Merrily We Live - I find this just as funny as Chris and The Bride did. The drunk scene with the stairs is priceless.

 

Green Dolphin Street - Great plot twist. This film is a guilty pleasure, although I agree that Lana makes a better impression in other films.

 

Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex - This one is fun, too. Years later Bette Davis realized that Errol Flynn is actually quite good in the film.

 

Terror in a Texas Town - Love the harpoon, but the idea of a duel with a harpoon is better than the actual showdown itself. You can only throw the thing once. The middle of the film drags, as Sterling Hayden slowly discovers what the audience already knows (poor writing there).

 

Great Day in the Morning - Robert Stack, sometimes a block of wood, is really quite good here, and so is Ruth Roman. A solid western.

 

Devotion - Far from accurate about the Bronte sisters, but not bad, especially if you like Ida Lupino. In real life, Charlotte Bronte was described by one writer as the shortest woman she had ever seen outside of a circus. Too bad Linda Hunt never played her.

 

Three Strangers - I love this one, especially because we don't know for at least two-thirds of the movie if Geraldine Fitzgerald will turn out to be a villain or not. Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, splendid direction by Jean Negulesco.

 

The Conspirators - Negulesco hated this film because working with Hedy Lamarr and Paul Henreid turned out to be difficult. It's an imitation Casablanca, too. And yet . . . if you look at what the director did, there is much to enjoy. Greenstreet and Lorre are there in smaller roles, too.

 

Three Coins in the Fountain - Negulesco's best work is pre-Cinemascope, but the fantasy of living in an affordable apartment in Rome carries me along. Good popcorn entertainment.

 

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Green Dolphin Street - Great plot twist. This film is a guilty pleasure...

 

Kingrat, reading the novel years ago I was SHOCKED when that was revealed. I have to say I love the phrase "equivico stravagante" which probably can be variously translated, but the one I saw was "curious misunderstanding." I think that this beautiful little phrase should be introduced to the lexicon of movie criticism, ha :-D Such an occurrence as in the story here is actually scary. I wonder what sort of real life situations have acturally occurred in people's lives. Interesting that you term this movie a guilty pleasure...I am interested in seeing this one.

 

Just for you, Laffite, I have gone back and added it to the list [Les Visiteurs du Soir] and will watch it in the next day or two.  I'm very curious about the film.  And your saying that you loved it makes me want to see it.

 

Why, thank you, my friend...I hope you find it an enjoyable watch. Sometimes I will be curiously interested throughout only to realize afterwards that I didn't really like a film. But I'll take a stand and predict a favorable reaction from you. Enjoy!

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Oh finally a post with a few more than usual which I've actually seen! The last few lists were making me question my classic-movie-junky credentials!

 

But I want to reply at length when less weary. Hopefully tomorrow.

 

King rat, how funny you mention Linda Hunt for I just read your post after seeing her brilliant turn in The Year of Living Dangerously on TCM. Great film---Frank, I recommend it.

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