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The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

12,975 posts in this topic

 

 

Green Dolphin Street - Great plot twist. This film is a guilty pleasure, although I agree that Lana makes a better impression in other films.

 

 

 

I love Green Dolphin Street. I've always felt that it's one of the late great films of the old Hollywood -- all those character actors: Dame May Whitty, Gladys Cooper, Edmund Gwenn, Frank Morgan. It has the feel and scope of a thirties movie; And it covers all those old plot points: sex, religion, and high society.  

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Geez, it's been forever since I posted.

 

Well, here are the latest films that I have watched:

 

Annie Oakley (1935)

The Badlanders (1958)

The Big Bluff (1955)

Blockade (1938)

Body and Soul (1947)

Buried Alive (1939)

Charlie Chan in City in Darkness (1939)

Charlie Chan in Panama (1940)

The Conspirators (1944)

Count Three and Pray (1955)

A Cry in the Night (1956)

Daddy Long Legs (1955)

Devotion (1946)

Down to Earth (1932)

Experiment Perilous (1944)

Five (1951)

Gentleman's Agreement (1947)

Great Day in the Morning (1956)

Green Dolphin Street (1947)

The Headless Horseman (1922)

Ivy (1947)

I Was a Communist for the F.B.I. (1951)

Les Visiteurs du Soir (1942)

Lloyd's of London (1936)

Merrily We Live (1938)

Mirage (1965)

The Murder Man (1935)

Nobody Lives Forever (1946)

On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969)

Phffft (1954)

The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939)

Sea Devils (1937)

The Spy in Black (1939)

Terror in a Texas Town (1958)

The Texas Rangers (1936)

Three Coins in the Fountain (1954)

Three Strangers (1946)

Tortilla Flat (1942)

Two Smart People (1946)

Week-End at the Waldorf (1945)

Youth Runs Wild (1944)

 

Does anyone have any thoughts on any of these films?  Any favorites?

 

You sat all the way through Daddy Long Legs?!! That's a musical!....and a FANTASTIC one at that. I bet you had a wonderfully torturous time with the LOOOOONNNG dream sequence. Heehee! It's actually one of my favorite comfort movies to watch when I have a depressing day, but then I'm pretty surely you could have guessed that one. Heehee!

 

What made you want to watch it?

 

As for Down to Earth...You must REALLY REALLY love Rita Hayworth to sit through all her musicals and keep watching more. Or maybe you could be slightly changing to a softer Frankie, and in that case, I would win, so that probably isn't true. Heehee! I'm not a huge Larry Parks fan, but I thought the movie was pretty cute.

 

One Her Majesty's Secret Service - Alright, I have to hear how you thought of this Bond movie. I know you are going in order, so I'm excited to hear about it. Although, I do have to tell you, I am not the biggest fan of Lazenby's "Bond". Joe thinks I'm crazy, because he loves this one, but I just didn't think he was tough enough for the part. Maybe it was just me?

 

I also really like these from your list:

 

The Badlanders, Green Dolphine street, Merrily We Live, Tortilla Flat, Week-end at the Waldorf, Phffft, Nobody Lives Forever

 

Mirage is one of my favorite pieces of wrok from Diane Baker! I really liked Peck's performance as well and it's just an all around exciting movie to watch. My eyes never wanted to leave the screen when watching it!

 

Phffft was a good move for Judy Holliday and I always love her with Lemmon anyway.

 

The Spy in Black is an interesting film. Usually I love Michael Powell films, but I'm still deciding whether or not I like this one. It's very much harbored on the whole British propaganda spectrum. But I will say that it got me thinking. I will watch any type of spy film and this one is quite on the uniquely understated simplistic side. I did like how it wasn't so graphic for the type of movie it is, and it leaves a lot to make you ponder. But what I didn't quite like were some of the slower parts. I felt that a couple scenes could have been chopped or at least done a little differently.

 

I'm gonna take a wild guess that you liked that one a lot. :D

 

The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex - Okay I procrastinated years to see this one, because I was afraid of what I would think of Bette with all that make-up and her portrayal of Elizabeth. I am very fascinated by the Royal Family history and usually revel in getting to see a film made about any of the members in English history, even if the film is slightly exaggerated or inebriated. Heehee! But I found this one to be interesting, especially compared to the 2005 mini-series "Elizabeth I" that was also based on their relationship. I found myself rather liking Bette and Errol together, very oddly enough. It's almost unbelievable, but that's probably one of the reasons I like it. But it has it's bitter moments for me.

 

You know what? I also forgot about The Conspirators! That's also one of the ones I like from your list. Henreid and Lamarr together are awesome!

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I really enjoyed the 2005 "Elizabeth I." What is not to like when Helen Mirren is around? Davis and Flynn are fine.

 

Like you I enjoy "Pfffft" (or however many "fs" are in it.)   I think I prefer It Could Happen To You" more as far as Lemmon/Holliday movies go.  

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I have just enough energy to comment a little on what I've seen.  I'm not sure what came in highest for you, Frank.  Maybe that French movie, which I haven't seen. :)

 

Annie Oakley (1935) - you might have enjoyed this one.  It's the only version of her story I can tolerate---the musical versions annoy me intensely.

The Badlanders (1958) - It's not a great western but the cast is rather fascinating.  I think Ernie was married to Katy when this was made.  Their relationship is the most interesting thing about the movie, actually.

Blockade (1938) - I found it dull propaganda

Body and Soul (1947) - Love it.  I hate boxing but I often find myself enjoying boxing movies!  It's my favorite of the artist/tough guy stories.  And of course, you now have to see the "Dick Van Dyke Show" episode where Rob tells Laura she's "no Lily Palmer".

The Conspirators (1944) - Very disappointing retread of Casablanca, but handsomely produced.

Count Three and Pray (1955) - odd story but charming in a back woodsy way.

A Cry in the Night (1956) - It feels like a rather low grade television story and taken on those terms, it has a creepy interest, if only for Burr's weirdo interpretation.  I think Natalie's fright was real---in being cast in such a thing!  "Scar" was appealing in comparison.

Daddy Long Legs (1955) - One of the few musicals I always enjoy watching.  I find the humor funny, the songs glorious and Fred and Leslie are sweet together in spite of the massive age difference.  Fred Clark's reactions to their "affair" are hilarious.  This is an innocent movie with some cheeky innuendo here and there----it could NEVER be made today, that's for sure.

Devotion (1946) - I love the story of the Bronte family but the movie is only so so to me.

Experiment Perilous (1944) - I really liked it, Hedy in these "mysterious woman" movies is a perfect combination.

Five (1951) - Very "Twilight Zone"; one of my favorite "apocolyptic" movies.

Gentleman's Agreement (1947) - Excellent film, really, though Peck is sometimes over-righteous for over-long.  I began to feel sorry for Dorothy.  Then again, it's refreshing to see someone so passionate about doing the right thing.

Green Dolphin Street (1947) - Another handsome production---Donna Reed and Van Heflin are excellent and the story is interesting, but it's simply too long to me.

The Headless Horseman (1922) - whimsical and piquant if not as good as the classic cartoon version. :)  Will Rogers.  He's pretty comfortable in these "fable" situations.

Ivy (1947) - Is this with Joan Fontaine being bad again?  Or Merle Oberon? 

Lloyd's of London (1936) - How much more dull can you get than a movie about insurance!

Merrily We Live (1938) - Lovely little madcap comedy.

Mirage (1965) - At first I was very disappointed, it felt like a poor copy of Charade, but I enjoy it more each time I see it. 

The Murder Man (1935) - I still haven't watched it but I'm dying to!

Nobody Lives Forever (1946) - You're on a Garfield kick!  Perhaps my favorite John Garfield movie, along with Force of Evil, Under My Skin, Humoresque and Body and Soul though not as good as those.  I like the love story and I thought George Couloris in particular put on quite a show.  You also don't often see Walter Brennan in such surroundings, at least not without Bogart.

On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) Probaby the best Bond story-wise and in having a more three-dimensional Bond woman---plus a real romance.  Lazenby is alright but not up to par.

Terror in a Texas Town (1958)  Pretty good because it's kind of off-beat.  Maybe Sterling told the director "I'm a sailor not a cowboy" so instead of a six shooter he put a harpoon in his hand.  That's what you get!

Private Lives of Elizabeth....Bette and Erroll are terrific and it's quite a show, I just don't care much for court (royal) costume dramas like this.

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This is how I liked the films:

 

1. The Badlanders (1958)

2. A Cry in the Night (1956)

3. Terror in a Texas Town (1958)

4. Mirage (1965)

5. Body and Soul (1947)

6. Great Day in the Morning (1956)

7. The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939)

8. Three Strangers (1946)

9. Les Visiteurs du Soir (1942)

10. On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969)

11. Annie Oakley (1935)

12. Merrily We Live (1938)

13. Two Smart People (1946)

14. Ivy (1947)

15. Tortilla Flat (1942)

16. Green Dolphin Street (1947)

17. Devotion (1946)

18. Phffft (1954)

19. Count Three and Pray (1955)

20. The Texas Rangers (1936)

21. Five (1951)

22. The Murder Man (1935)

23. The Conspirators (1944)

24. Charlie Chan in Panama (1940)

25. Sea Devils (1937)

26. Gentleman's Agreement (1947)

27. Nobody Lives Forever (1946)

28. Experiment Perilous (1944)

29. The Spy in Black (1939)

30. Blockade (1938)

31. Lloyd's of London (1936)

32. Charlie Chan in City in Darkness (1939)

33. Daddy Long Legs (1955)

34. Week-End at the Waldorf (1945)

35. Youth Runs Wild (1944)

36. Down to Earth (1932)

37. Buried Alive (1939)

38. Three Coins in the Fountain (1954)

39. The Headless Horseman (1922)

40. The Big Bluff (1955)

41. I Was a Communist for the F.B.I. (1951)

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Wow, you are all over the map with the decades this time. You seem to be embracing your "fifties" side with your top three, though, "Mr. I love the 30's" :)

 

I love how these movie watching extravaganza's are expanding your horizons in all sorts of ways. You are sampling all sorts of genres from all sorts of decades. Your variety is quite the testimony to the power of open minded thinking! :D

 

Now.. if we could just get you to try some REAL FOOD for a change, too, and encourage you to just step away from your place in line at The SaurKraut and SawDust Buffet.  HA! :P

 

Now THAT would be making some REAL progress :D

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Wow, you are all over the map with the decades this time. You seem to be embracing your "fifties" side with your top three, though, "Mr. I love the 30's" :)

 

You've got me all wrong!  Of the 30s, 40s, and 50s, the 30s is my least favorite.  I tend to be in the minority on this board with that thinking.  The board greatly favors films from the 30s.  I like post-WWII films (40s and 50s) because of film noir and westerns.

 


I love how these movie watching extravaganza's are expanding your horizons in all sorts of ways. You are sampling all sorts of genres from all sorts of decades. Your variety is quite the testimony to the power of open minded thinking! :D

 

Thank you!  I have been very good about watching all kinds of films, so I do give myself some credit.  I'm mostly a reflection of those who I spend time with on the board.  But you'll still find plenty of "me" in what I like most.

 

Now.. if we could just get you to try some REAL FOOD for a change, too, and encourage you to just step away from your place in line at The SaurKraut and SawDust Buffet.  HA! :P

 

Now THAT would be making some REAL progress :D

 

Boy, you ain't foolin' with that!  My menu is pretty much the kids' menu!

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You've got me all wrong!  Of the 30s, 40s, and 50s, the 30s is my least favorite. 

 

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Typical. So typical. ha. Here I think I finally have  you figured for something and I am totally out to lunch. ha. I could have sworn that a LONG.. long, (long) time ago (maybe a  year or two before you started making these "recently watched lists" on here, I remembered a conversation with you about something where i had suggested a film to you (don't remember what..but whatever it was, you said (I THOUGHT you said) that you were really more into films from the 1930's and doubted you would want to see it.

 

At least I THOUGHT it was  you who told me that. Maybe it was one of your alter egos. HA! :D 

 

I tend to be in the minority on this board with that thinking.  The board greatly favors films from the 30s.  I like post-WWII films (40s and 50s) because of film noir and westerns.

 

Ha.. yes.  Now that makes sense, I do confess. Silly me. The noirs and the westerns.... and the mushy romance movies. Let's don't forget those. :P

 

have been very good about watching all kinds of films, so I do give myself some credit. 

 

And well you should. It is fun to see you step out there and take a chance. You definitely have gone all out in figuring out new ways to expand your movie-watching tastes. I like to read your lists. I may not have seen many of the movies, but it is fun to see how you rate them and read your commentary too. 

 

I'm mostly a reflection of those who I spend time with on the board.  But you'll still find plenty of "me" in what I like most.

 

No surprise there. I do get that sense about you for sure. 

 

My menu is pretty much the kids' menu

 

Ha.. not EVEN. I would have hated that run-around with YOU as a kidling. ("Mom.. I can't eat that. it's (gasp!) a green VEGETABLE!!!!) UGH. Your poor parents, how you must have put them through the ringer. :D  

 

How did your country grandma EVER put up with you at family dinners.. living in the country she was SURE to have had some good ole veggies for you to eat. Poor woman. What you  must have put her through. :P

 

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Hey there, Ma Stone -- Well it's about TIME you came out of hiding, Mr. Man in the Shadows, and posted another list. I was wondering if you had any new ones lately.  

 

It's been a struggle, of late.

 

But ha.. now after reading your list I have to confess I think this may be one of the most 'un-watched" (by me) bunches you've ever had (and that is saying a lot because I don't usually have very many anyway, that I can say I have seen) But this batch is even more so.

 

The list definitely featured some "deeper catalog" films.  I was watching some films of specific performers and directors, such as John Garfield, Hedy Lamarr, Jacques Tourneur, etc.

 

I can tell you I have seen Green Dolphin Street and don't remember hardly anything about it other than the REALLY intense earthquake scenes. As I recall they were very well done.. very impressive. As for the story.. I would really have to sit back and think long and hard to tell you much more about it. 

 

You are right, the earthquake scenes are terrific.  I was highly impressed by them.  I thought the entire film was really good, actually.  Van Heflin is superb.  I love all of the thwarted love in the film.

 

I have also at least seen the COVER of Texas Rangers.. ha. That is in that batch of four movies on the DVD that I own.. but I can't say for sure if I have seen it. (I think so.. but again.. it's been a good long while so it's anyone's guess at this point, ha) 

 

It's a surprisingly decent western.  It's a mix of everything.


 

(woo hoo.. I am editing my post. I have also seen Count Three and Pray.. a long time ago, but I do remember it now. (Raymond Burr was the bad-guy, as I recall) Don't remember a whole lot except I do recall I liked it well enough.)

 

That's one I would have suggested for you to watch.  It has themes you'd appreciate.  Once again, Van Heflin is excellent.  Burr does play the villain, but he's not too interesting, shockingly.

 

And have also seen Three Strangers.. but ha.. again, don't remember much.  (HA.. are you are getting tired of hearing this?) :D

 

A really nice film.  Love the mood and performances.

 

Bonjour, Laffite -- I  have Green Dolphin Street still on my DVR from ages ago and I will now get to it since it is on your list. I’ve just watched an early opera by Rossini entitled Equivico Stravagante which is a gorgeous way of saying “Colossal Mistake or Misunderstanding” or something close to that, and I thought of that just now seeing GDS on your list. Years ago I tried reading this rather long novel and didn’t get through it but I do believe I’ve seen this movie but much too long ago. It’s a good story. I seem to remember liking the earthy performance of Van H and feeling that Lana looked uncharistically drab, meaningless comments though, but I will look again, pleased to see that it is still on the DVR.

 

I was greatly surprised by the film.  I typically enter a "Lana Turner" picture with great trepidation, but this one ended up being right down my alley.  All of the loves not found and then the love that is gained makes the film fascinating to me.

 

And Scott, I was looking (in vain, alas) for Les Visiteurs du Soir on this most current list because I recall you posting your intent to see that one.. Have you seen it yet? I just did and loved it. Some really astonishing great actors. Jules Berry practically runs away with the whole movie in the last half, wonderfully done. There are some other well-known actors of that period: Arletty, Fernand Ledoux (Anne’s father) and a wonderful actor named Marcel Herrand who has the demeanor and bearing of a Lawrence Olivier and who is extremely good  The actors who played Gilles and Anne are less familiar to me. I’ll say no more to avoid spoilers but if you’ve seen this I hope you comment or give me the go ahead and I’ll go first. Not a major ramble, just a few comments, but I want to hold off if you haven't as yet seen it. And if not, please do, I think it's quite good. I’m not necessarily at home with these cryptic and philisophical films by some of these great masters, I can enjoy them but the meanings don’t always jump out at me, ha. This one pleases mightily and with a terrific FIN. Another film of this ilk that I’m crazy about his Bergman’s The Seventh Seal, a similar look at ‘the other side’ if you will. Smiles of a Summer Night is another one, simply fabulous…but Bergman has an uneven appeal to me, some I don’t like at all, though well liked by others.

 

Feel free to comment on Les Visiteurs du Soir.  I have watched it and I certainly did enjoy it.  It's very "otherworldly", which I like.  You are spot on about the performances.  Jules Berry as the "Devil" changes the tone of the film, for sure.  Arletty is coldly bewitching.

 

Howdy, Cowboy Chris -- Thanks for the list. Things have been kind of slow waiting on you to get the next batch. Unfortunately, this may be the lowest total I've seen of one of your lists. A few I saw years ago but don't remember enough to comment. 

 

I keep getting deeper and deeper into the filmographies and that leads to lesser-seen titles.

 

Merrily We Live. It is funny. People may call it a poor man's My Man Godfrey but there is plenty to enjoy on its own. Billie Burke is a riot and Bonita Granville is quite endearing. Fine cast of Hal Roach support players. The scene of the father making it up the stairs while drunk caught The Bride so off guard that we had to stop the movie for her to compose herself. For us, it's a keeper.

 

I agree with all you say.  The film reminded me a lot of My Man Godfrey but it did have its own charm.  Bonita is lovely in the film.  I enjoyed the playfulness of Constance Bennett and Brian Aherne.  It's a very good 30s film.

 

The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex. Who wouldn't love Davis and Flynn? Knowing they weren't on each other's list of favorites adds to the fun. They are both quite good. The sets and costumes are impressive. 

 

This was another winning suggestion by Jackie.  I would have never guessed I'd go for a costume picture.  But this one is wonderful thanks to Bette and Errol.  Their relationship is the entire film and I ate all of that up.  Talk about two stubborn mules who were in love with each other!

 

On Her Majesty's Secret Service. A good Bond picture with some great action scenes and a wonderful Diana Rigg. People will argue over whether Lazenby was any good but, while he is no Connery - or any of the others - I think he does a fine job. A wonderful soundtrack and a real romance make this somewhat different and well worth the time. (I like it more than the preceding and following pictures.)

 

While this has been my least favorite of the six Bond films that I have watched, I still enjoyed it.  What I liked most was George Lazenby's vulnerability.  I also liked Diana Rigg.  What I wasn't crazy about was the premise and the finale.  That's what has it ranking lowest of the Bonds films, for me.

 

Hola, Kingrat -- Frank, I'm delighted that you saw Mirage, which I haven't seen in years but loved. One of the best 60s thrillers. Makes my top five for 1965.

 

Top five for '65?  Wow!  That's pretty good.  I definitely liked it.  I love how the film really messes with you.  It had me guessing throughout.  The entire "basement" dealy had me scratching my head.  I do like Gregory Peck in these kind of pictures.  It's a return to his Hitchcockian roots.

 

Merrily We Live - I find this just as funny as Chris and The Bride did. The drunk scene with the stairs is priceless.

 

I'm a fan of cat-and-mouse love games and this one has a pretty fun one.

 

Green Dolphin Street - Great plot twist. This film is a guilty pleasure, although I agree that Lana makes a better impression in other films.

 

Yeah, I wouldn't say this is a "Lana" film, but I liked her here.  And I'm someone who usually doesn't go for Lana.  I liked all the players in this one.  But what won me over was all of the torturous love from multiple people.  It seemed as if nobody was happy.

 

Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex - This one is fun, too. Years later Bette Davis realized that Errol Flynn is actually quite good in the film.

 

And she would be right.  Nobody can match the natural charisma of Errol.  He was a true force of nature.  He's leaping off the screen at you.  He's simply magnificent in this picture.

 

Terror in a Texas Town - Love the harpoon, but the idea of a duel with a harpoon is better than the actual showdown itself. You can only throw the thing once. The middle of the film drags, as Sterling Hayden slowly discovers what the audience already knows (poor writing there).

 

It's a completely absurd showdown and ironic twist but it still worked for me.  The film is pretty much an absurd High Noon and Shane.

 

Great Day in the Morning - Robert Stack, sometimes a block of wood, is really quite good here, and so is Ruth Roman. A solid western.

 

I'm with ya.  Stack isn't a performer I look forward to spending time with, but he's pretty darn good in this one.  Ruth Roman and Virginia Mayo really help make the time spent even better.  Ruth is superb.  I feel Great Day in the Morning is an underrated western.

 

Devotion - Far from accurate about the Bronte sisters, but not bad, especially if you like Ida Lupino. In real life, Charlotte Bronte was described by one writer as the shortest woman she had ever seen outside of a circus. Too bad Linda Hunt never played her.

 

:D  For me to say I liked a film about the Bronte sisters is saying a heckuva lot.  But I did like this film.  I really liked Olivia de Havilland in the film.  I thought it was a good role for her.  Ida is also lovely.

 

Three Strangers - I love this one, especially because we don't know for at least two-thirds of the movie if Geraldine Fitzgerald will turn out to be a villain or not. Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, splendid direction by Jean Negulesco.

 

Once again, we're on the same page.  I liked this one, as well.  I love the entire mood of the film along with the different yet somewhat similar circumstances each of these strangers found themselves in.  I was greatly surprised by the ending, namely who comes out looking the best.

 

The Conspirators - Negulesco hated this film because working with Hedy Lamarr and Paul Henreid turned out to be difficult. It's an imitation Casablanca, too. And yet . . . if you look at what the director did, there is much to enjoy. Greenstreet and Lorre are there in smaller roles, too.

 

This is another film where the cast and mood helped elevate the film for me.  I didn't find the story to be all that compelling, but it's mysterious enough to keep one engaged.  It's always nice to see guys like Joseph Calleia, Steven Geray, and Victor Francen.

 

Three Coins in the Fountain - Negulesco's best work is pre-Cinemascope, but the fantasy of living in an affordable apartment in Rome carries me along. Good popcorn entertainment.

 

I was hoping to like this one but it never captured me.  It was only Dorothy McGuire and Clifton Webb's relationship that interested me.  Talk about an upset!

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That's one I would have suggested for you to watch.  It has themes you'd appreciate.  Once again, Van Heflin is excellent.  Burr does play the villain, but he's not too interesting, shockingly.

 

I should check it out again, sometime, if only to just refresh my memory on it. In fact.. reading all the Green Dolphin Street chat here is making me wish I could remember  more about THAT one as well. Will have to keep an eye out for it. 

 

Any others stand out for you as ones you think I should check out? 

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Any others stand out for you as ones you think I should check out? 

 

If I was to guess the films you'd like most from the list, I'd go with:

 

1. Tortilla Flat - The setting may not be to your liking, the theme is completely "you".

2. Count Three and Pray - Such a human western.

3. The Murder Man - I think you'd enjoy this interesting "Spencer Tracy" film.

4. Sea Devils - A very simple Naval tale with a father and a potential son-in-law going at each other.  The father is played by Victor McLaglen and the young man is played by Preston Foster.  Ida Lupino is the gal in the middle.  It's not The Quiet Man, but I believe you'd enjoy the film for Vic and the ending.

5. Ivy - Again, the setting may not suit you, but Joan Fontaine would get you going.

6. Terror in a Texas Town - You won't find a showdown any more different than the one in this one.  The western themes are good.

7. The Badlanders - I believe you'd like Ernest Borgnine in this western.

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Thanks for the tips. I looked them up and  the only one I found on youtube was Terror In a Texas Town (so will try to get  to that one soon!) The others will have to try to find at the library or some other way, though I have seen Count Three and Pray.. but just don't remember much, so will be sure look for it too, so I can watch it again sometime. 

 

Oh wait.. I am editing my post.. (duh, I am getting old in the brain.. ha)  because I also found Ivy.. so will look to watch that one soon as well. :) 

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Hi, Silly Goose -- You sat all the way through Daddy Long Legs?!! That's a musical!....and a FANTASTIC one at that. I bet you had a wonderfully torturous time with the LOOOOONNNG dream sequence. Heehee! It's actually one of my favorite comfort movies to watch when I have a depressing day, but then I'm pretty surely you could have guessed that one. Heehee!

 

What made you want to watch it?

 

Tortuous is right! :P  I chose to watch the film because of Thelma Ritter.  Isn't that why everyone chooses to watch it? :)  I do like Fred Astaire, but I can't say this was a film I liked that much.

 

 

As for Down to Earth...You must REALLY REALLY love Rita Hayworth to sit through all her musicals and keep watching more. Or maybe you could be slightly changing to a softer Frankie, and in that case, I would win, so that probably isn't true. Heehee! I'm not a huge Larry Parks fan, but I thought the movie was pretty cute.

 

I didn't watch that one!  I watched Will Rogers' Down to Earth, silly.  But I'm sure I'll eventually get to Rita's because I am looking to watch her films.

 

One Her Majesty's Secret Service - Alright, I have to hear how you thought of this Bond movie. I know you are going in order, so I'm excited to hear about it. Although, I do have to tell you, I am not the biggest fan of Lazenby's "Bond". Joe thinks I'm crazy, because he loves this one, but I just didn't think he was tough enough for the part. Maybe it was just me?

 

It's my least favorite of the Bond films that I have watched, but it's pretty close to some others.  I just didn't like the story and the finale is too ludicrous for me.  As for Lazenby, I actually liked him.  I thought his sensitive version of Bond was pretty good.  I don't like him more than Sean Connery, of course.  And you should like this Bond!  He gets married, for goodness sake!

 

Mirage is one of my favorite pieces of wrok from Diane Baker! I really liked Peck's performance as well and it's just an all around exciting movie to watch. My eyes never wanted to leave the screen when watching it!

 

Now this kind of surprises me.  I don't see you liking these 60s thrillers.  I enjoyed the film.  I also liked Diane.

 

Phffft was a good move for Judy Holliday and I always love her with Lemmon anyway.

 

Very good!  Not everyone is a fan of Jack, so I wasn't sure where you stood with him.

 

The Spy in Black is an interesting film. Usually I love Michael Powell films, but I'm still deciding whether or not I like this one. It's very much harbored on the whole British propaganda spectrum. But I will say that it got me thinking. I will watch any type of spy film and this one is quite on the uniquely understated simplistic side. I did like how it wasn't so graphic for the type of movie it is, and it leaves a lot to make you ponder. But what I didn't quite like were some of the slower parts. I felt that a couple scenes could have been chopped or at least done a little differently.

 

I was disappointed in this one.  I was hoping the combination of Conrad Veidt and Michael Powell would be fantastic.  But I thought the film was underwhelming.  As you say, the film is mostly propaganda.  I thought Veidt's character was drawn too sharply.


The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex - Okay I procrastinated years to see this one, because I was afraid of what I would think of Bette with all that make-up and her portrayal of Elizabeth. I am very fascinated by the Royal Family history and usually revel in getting to see a film made about any of the members in English history, even if the film is slightly exaggerated or inebriated. Heehee! But I found this one to be interesting, especially compared to the 2005 mini-series "Elizabeth I" that was also based on their relationship. I found myself rather liking Bette and Errol together, very oddly enough. It's almost unbelievable, but that's probably one of the reasons I like it. But it has it's bitter moments for me.

 

What are the bitter moments?  I really liked the film.  I loved the mule-headed love.

 

You know what? I also forgot about The Conspirators! That's also one of the ones I like from your list. Henreid and Lamarr together are awesome!

 

I got a kick out of seeing a scene that Top Secret! parodied from this film. :D

 

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Bonjour, Fordy Guns -- I have just enough energy to comment a little on what I've seen.  I'm not sure what came in highest for you, Frank.  Maybe that French movie, which I haven't seen. :)


 

That one showed well with me, but I'm not sure you'd go for it or not.  There is a Pandora and the Flying Dutchman mysticism to the film, though.

 

Annie Oakley (1935) - you might have enjoyed this one.  It's the only version of her story I can tolerate---the musical versions annoy me intensely.

 

You are right, I did enjoy it!  I was pleasantly surprised by the love story.  It's why I liked the film.  The relationship between Annie (Barbara Stanwyck) and Toby (Preston Foster) is sensational.  The ending is lovely.

 

The Badlanders (1958) - It's not a great western but the cast is rather fascinating.  I think Ernie was married to Katy when this was made.  Their relationship is the most interesting thing about the movie, actually.

 

You are right about Ernie and Katy's relationship being one of the strongest aspects of this western.  But I liked it for other reasons, too.  Borgnine is terrific.  I liked seeing Alan Ladd playing this kind of character.  Actually, the ending is quite a surprise in regards to the Code.

 

Blockade (1938) - I found it dull propaganda

 

I can't say that I disagree.  But what's interesting about the film is seeing Henry Fonda playing an idealistic character just prior to his work with John Ford.  It was like seeing Tom Joad before Tom Joad.

 

Body and Soul (1947) - Love it.  I hate boxing but I often find myself enjoying boxing movies!  It's my favorite of the artist/tough guy stories.  And of course, you now have to see the "Dick Van Dyke Show" episode where Rob tells Laura she's "no Lily Palmer".

 

I thought I had seen that episode of DVD.  Is it before season five?  I agree with you about boxing films being compelling.  I don't always look forward to watching such films but I usually like them quite a bit.  This was certainly the case with Body and Soul.  It's a pretty good film.  I'm also warming up to John Garfield.

 

The Conspirators (1944) - Very disappointing retread of Casablanca, but handsomely produced.

 

Right on target.  The cast is excellent though, and that helped me enjoy the film just enough.

 

Count Three and Pray (1955) - odd story but charming in a back woodsy way.

 

I would have thought you'd dislike this film because of the kind of character Joanne Woodward plays. She was annoyingly cute.  I eventually warmed up to her.

 

A Cry in the Night (1956) - It feels like a rather low grade television story and taken on those terms, it has a creepy interest, if only for Burr's weirdo interpretation.  I think Natalie's fright was real---in being cast in such a thing!  "Scar" was appealing in comparison.

 

:D  I really liked this one.  It's easily one of the creepiest films that I have seen from this era.  Raymond Burr is spectacular.  In fact, I feel it's one of his best performances, which is saying a lot.  What makes the film silly is seeing the cops and the boyfriend working together.  "Hooray for Hollywood"!

 

Daddy Long Legs (1955) - One of the few musicals I always enjoy watching.  I find the humor funny, the songs glorious and Fred and Leslie are sweet together in spite of the massive age difference.  Fred Clark's reactions to their "affair" are hilarious.  This is an innocent movie with some cheeky innuendo here and there----it could NEVER be made today, that's for sure.

 

I agree, there is no way this film would fly today.  Today's minds and sensibilities are much too judgmental and sensitive for such silliness.  I can't say I went for the film, though.  Fred on campus?  Ugh!

 

Devotion (1946) - I love the story of the Bronte family but the movie is only so so to me.

 

I cannot believe I liked a picture about the Brontes more than you!  Unbelievable!  The cast is stellar.

 

Experiment Perilous (1944) - I really liked it, Hedy in these "mysterious woman" movies is a perfect combination.

 

Here's another where we are at opposite ends of the spectrum.  I do agree with your comment about Hedy, though.  I do like her in mysterious roles.

 

Five (1951) - Very "Twilight Zone"; one of my favorite "apocolyptic" movies.

 

It's definitely a "Twilight Zone" kind of film.  That's a great comparison.  I was struggling with this film, though.  It was too dry for me.

 

Gentleman's Agreement (1947) - Excellent film, really, though Peck is sometimes over-righteous for over-long.  I began to feel sorry for Dorothy.  Then again, it's refreshing to see someone so passionate about doing the right thing.

 

I usually like social commentary films, even if they are too righteous.  But I just couldn't get into this one.  It really was too much.  What I liked most was how Dorothy McGuire's character was struggling with the entire idea of how others viewed her and the man she loved.

 

Green Dolphin Street (1947) - Another handsome production---Donna Reed and Van Heflin are excellent and the story is interesting, but it's simply too long to me.

 

What is going on?!  How am I liking these dramas more than you?!  I just love all of the squashed love in this film.  Van Heflin was in "Doniphon country", which I loved.

 

The Headless Horseman (1922) - whimsical and piquant if not as good as the classic cartoon version. :)  Will Rogers.  He's pretty comfortable in these "fable" situations.

 

When I saw Will starred in The Headless Horseman and it was available on YouTube, I just couldn't wait to watch it.  Boy, was I ever disappointed.  The film dragged and I found it to be uninteresting.

 

Ivy (1947) - Is this with Joan Fontaine being bad again?  Or Merle Oberon? 

 

This would be Joan.  Oh, Joan.

 

Lloyd's of London (1936) - How much more dull can you get than a movie about insurance!

 

You made me laugh with that one!  And I concur with your sentiment.

 

Merrily We Live (1938) - Lovely little madcap comedy.

 

I'm with ya.  I liked Brian Aherne and Constance Bennett.  They made a pretty fun couple.

 

Mirage (1965) - At first I was very disappointed, it felt like a poor copy of Charade, but I enjoy it more each time I see it. 

 

Terrific!  It felt like Gregory Peck was returning to his Hitchcockian roots.  The film had a Spellbound feel to it.

 

The Murder Man (1935) - I still haven't watched it but I'm dying to!

 

I think you'll like it.  Spence is superb.  And it's a different kind of Spence.

 

Nobody Lives Forever (1946) - You're on a Garfield kick!  Perhaps my favorite John Garfield movie, along with Force of Evil, Under My Skin, Humoresque and Body and Soul though not as good as those.  I like the love story and I thought George Couloris in particular put on quite a show.  You also don't often see Walter Brennan in such surroundings, at least not without Bogart.

 

Nicely said!  And you are right, I've been watching more and more Garfield.  That's a good catch by you.  I didn't go for the film, though.  The love story and characters are very good, but the overall feel of the film didn't reel me in.  I liked George Tobias the most.  But your comment about Walter Brennan is spot on.

 

On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) Probaby the best Bond story-wise and in having a more three-dimensional Bond woman---plus a real romance.  Lazenby is alright but not up to par.

 

I would have never expected you to say that!  I thought you'd discard it quickly because of Lazenby, who is a drastic change from Sean Connery.  I didn't like the story.  Your Telly as the villain?  Meh.  And then the skiing chase with Telly.  That was tough to watch.

 

Terror in a Texas Town (1958)  Pretty good because it's kind of off-beat.  Maybe Sterling told the director "I'm a sailor not a cowboy" so instead of a six shooter he put a harpoon in his hand.  That's what you get!

 

Look at you and the humor!  You're getting some laughs out of me.  I can just hear Sterling saying that, too.  Your saying the film is "off-beat" is perfect.  That's exactly it.  And, for me, that helped me like the film more.  Even though I was reminded of Shane of High Noon, the film is so off-center that it becomes unique.

 

Private Lives of Elizabeth....Bette and Erroll are terrific and it's quite a show, I just don't care much for court (royal) costume dramas like this.

 

I'm frightened!  You know darn well that I don't do costume dramas yet here I am liking this film a lot.  Errol is so darn magnetic in this film.  I really went for the love of Elizabeth and Essex.  They were both too proud to give in to the other, yet they were completely crazy for each other.  I loved that.

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You are right, I did enjoy it!  I was pleasantly surprised by the love story.  It's why I liked the film.  The relationship between Annie (Barbara Stanwyck) and Toby (Preston Foster) is sensational.  The ending is lovely.

 

The love story is, of course, what made the film for me, too. Have you seen The Great Man's Lady? It's is another with an unusual love story, starring Barbara Stanwyck.  It's not the wild west but old California, I believe, and co-stars Joel McRea and Brian Donlevy in a real switch of casting. 

 

 

You are right about Ernie and Katy's relationship being one of the strongest aspects of this western.  But I liked it for other reasons, too.  Borgnine is terrific.  I liked seeing Alan Ladd playing this kind of character.  Actually, the ending is quite a surprise in regards to the Code.

 

I think I remember what you mean about the ending.  I think what held it back was the surreally untalented Claire Kelly in the role of Ladd's love interest.  Alan didn't have too many hits at this stage of his career, but this was one of his better westerns of the period I agree.

 

 

I can't say that I disagree.  But what's interesting about the film is seeing Henry Fonda playing an idealistic character just prior to his work with John Ford.  It was like seeing Tom Joad before Tom Joad.  

 

Yes, but he and the whole things came off too preachy for my taste and it's not a "message" I care for.  

 

I thought I had seen that episode of DVD.  Is it before season five? 

 

I think it's in the last season---I'm almost certain.

 

I agree with you about boxing films being compelling.  I don't always look forward to watching such films but I usually like them quite a bit.  This was certainly the case with Body and Soul.  It's a pretty good film.  I'm also warming up to John Garfield.

 

I'd love to see this movie again, it's been quite a while.  It's just about perfect all around.  Terrific cast, photography, love story, drama and literate script.  I prefer it to Golden Boy.

 

Count Three and Pray (1955) - odd story but charming in a back woodsy way.

 

I would have thought you'd dislike this film because of the kind of character Joanne Woodward plays. She was annoyingly cute.  I eventually warmed up to her.

 

She did annoy me at first but Van Heflin has a way of lifting most any film for me.  He and Edmund O'Brien, two homely mugs who constantly deliver.

 

:D  I really liked this one.  It's easily one of the creepiest films that I have seen from this era.  Raymond Burr is spectacular.  In fact, I feel it's one of his best performances, which is saying a lot.  What makes the film silly is seeing the cops and the boyfriend working together.  "Hooray for Hollywood"!

 

I totally agree that the "righteous" element is played ham-fisted, it's the weirdo part, the kidnapping, that makes the film becuase it veers on the graphic side.  I mean, it feels like a much, much later film in those scenes.  Though I am amazed you liked it THAT much.

 

I agree, there is no way this film would fly today.  Today's minds and sensibilities are much too judgmental and sensitive for such silliness.  I can't say I went for the film, though.  Fred on campus?  Ugh!

 

I understand; no guy is going to care much for this one unless it's purely for Thelma & Fred.  :D

 

I cannot believe I liked a picture about the Brontes more than you!  Unbelievable!  The cast is stellar.

 

Maybe because I'm so attached to the stories of the sisters, I have a picture in my mind of how they were and this movie which I had high hopes for, disappointed me a bit.  If I had no preconceptions, as you did coming into it, I might like it better.

 

Here's another where we are at opposite ends of the spectrum.  I do agree with your comment about Hedy, though.  I do like her in mysterious roles.

 

You didn't like it?  Too "dry"?  It's not edge-of-your-seat, I know.

 

Five (1951) - Very "Twilight Zone"; one of my favorite "apocolyptic" movies.

 

It's definitely a "Twilight Zone" kind of film.  That's a great comparison.  I was struggling with this film, though.  It was too dry for me.

 

Really?  Too bad, I found it fascinating.  But then I have really liked every Arch Obler flick I've seen so far.  He has an off-beat, intelligent touch that, like Serling, appeals to me.  He was unique.

 

I usually like social commentary films, even if they are too righteous.  But I just couldn't get into this one.  It really was too much.  What I liked most was how Dorothy McGuire's character was struggling with the entire idea of how others viewed her and the man she loved.

 

It was a brave film for the time but I know what you mean.

 

What is going on?!  How am I liking these dramas more than you?!  I just love all of the squashed love in this film.  Van Heflin was in "Doniphon country", which I loved.

 

I'm very surprised you liked it.  Maybe it took them too long to get to New Zealand and Van.  The story itself, as I said, is a classic one.  The book was a massive best seller a la Gone with the Wind and Forever Amber so they gave the production everything they had.

 

When I saw Will starred in The Headless Horseman and it was available on YouTube, I just couldn't wait to watch it.  Boy, was I ever disappointed.  The film dragged and I found it to be uninteresting.

 

Well it's true it's silly but I thought it too short to be draggy. :D

 

Ivy (1947) - Is this with Joan Fontaine being bad again?  Or Merle Oberon? 

 

This would be Joan.  Oh, Joan.

 

 

I don't think I liked this one.

 

Terrific!  It felt like Gregory Peck was returning to his Hitchcockian roots.  The film had a Spellbound feel to it.

 

True---especially the druggy scene on the highway and the surrealistic cinematography.  I just feel it tries a tad too hard.

 

Nicely said!  And you are right, I've been watching more and more Garfield.  That's a good catch by you.  I didn't go for the film, though.  The love story and characters are very good, but the overall feel of the film didn't reel me in.  I liked George Tobias the most.  But your comment about Walter Brennan is spot on.

 

It's a "soft movie" which is why I like it, i guess.  That and the assortment of characters with Geraldine Fitzgerald looking so out of place among them all, which is perfect.  It's the kind of set-up Gable or Cagney would have been cast in ten-fifteen years earlier.

 

I would have never expected you to say that!  I thought you'd discard it quickly because of Lazenby, who is a drastic change from Sean Connery.  I didn't like the story.  Your Telly as the villain?  Meh.  And then the skiing chase with Telly.  That was tough to watch.

 

Now I must admit that though it seem ideal casting, Telly is not the best Blofeld.  I guess he's stronger in either hero or anti-hero roles.  As for Lazenby, I was shocked myself that I didn't mind him much.  He's definitely low on the pole but boy, he sure was fit.  And I thought the ski-bunnies at Blofeld's ski aerie were hilarious. 

 

 

 

Look at you and the humor!  You're getting some laughs out of me.  I can just hear Sterling saying that, too.  Your saying the film is "off-beat" is perfect.  That's exactly it.  And, for me, that helped me like the film more.  Even though I was reminded of Shane of High Noon, the film is so off-center that it becomes unique.

 

I can only imagine all the crazy stuff Sterling was thinking about this one.  I wish I could recall if he wrote much about it in his memoirs, probably not.  He was so disdainful of his own movies with few exceptions.

 

It's one of ChiO's favorites, if I'm not mistaken.  Joseph Lewis, right?

 

 

I'm frightened!  You know darn well that I don't do costume dramas yet here I am liking this film a lot.  Errol is so darn magnetic in this film.  I really went for the love of Elizabeth and Essex.  They were both too proud to give in to the other, yet they were completely crazy for each other.  I loved that.

 

i agree with all that---Bette and Errol are outstanding, Errol particularly is blazingly charismatic.  You really can picture him being a part of a more daring, adventurous century.  He doesn't have to "act" that, he's totally comfortable there and I fully believe he'd have been exactly like that with the real Queen E.

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Howdy, Fordy Guns -- The love story is, of course, what made the film for me, too. Have you seen The Great Man's Lady? It's is another with an unusual love story, starring Barbara Stanwyck.  It's not the wild west but old California, I believe, and co-stars Joel McRea and Brian Donlevy in a real switch of casting. 

 

No, I haven't seen that one but I do have it on DVD.  I'll watch it in the next group.  Do you like it?

 

I think I remember what you mean about the ending.  I think what held it back was the surreally untalented Claire Kelly in the role of Ladd's love interest.  Alan didn't have too many hits at this stage of his career, but this was one of his better westerns of the period I agree.

 

"Surreally untalented"!  Such creative criticism!  I was okay with Claire, but I can't really defend her. :)  Katy was far more captivating, of course.

 

Yes, but he and the whole things came off too preachy for my taste and it's not a "message" I care for.  

 

Very true.  The film is very preachy.  Madeleine was disagreeable like someone I know. :P

 

I think it's in the last season---I'm almost certain.

 

Oh!  I haven't watched the last season of DVD, so I haven't seen the "Lilli Palmer" episode.  I like Lilli and her sweater in Cloak and Dagger. :)

 

I'd love to see this movie again, it's been quite a while.  It's just about perfect all around.  Terrific cast, photography, love story, drama and literate script.  I prefer it to Golden Boy.

 

I haven't seen Golden Boy.  Who I liked most in Body and Soul was future director Joseph Pevney, who played Garfield's buddy, "Shorty".  The combination of Robert Rossen and Abraham Polonsky is a really good one, as well.

 

She did annoy me at first but Van Heflin has a way of lifting most any film for me.  He and Edmund O'Brien, two homely mugs who constantly deliver.

 

I didn't know you liked Van that much.  He continues to impress me.  I like him quite a bit.  The reason I chose to watch Count Three and Pray was because of Van.

 

I totally agree that the "righteous" element is played ham-fisted, it's the weirdo part, the kidnapping, that makes the film becuase it veers on the graphic side.  I mean, it feels like a much, much later film in those scenes.  Though I am amazed you liked it THAT much.

 

I just loved seeing Raymond Burr playing such a damaged "boy".  There's a real sadness to his creepiness.  This is why I feel the performance is sensational.  I think anyone who likes Raymond should check out A Cry in the Night.

 

I understand; no guy is going to care much for this one unless it's purely for Thelma & Fred.  :D

 

I can believe that.  And I really did like Thelma and both Freds.  Thelma is such a peach.

 

Maybe because I'm so attached to the stories of the sisters, I have a picture in my mind of how they were and this movie which I had high hopes for, disappointed me a bit.  If I had no preconceptions, as you did coming into it, I might like it better.

 

What a fascinating point!  Now I can see how you would have a different feeling about the film.  It's probably why I don't like The Pride of the Yankees whereas those who are not into baseball as much as me seem to really like it.  And since I have no interest in the Bronte family, I can watch the film with zero expectations.

 

You didn't like it?  Too "dry"?  It's not edge-of-your-seat, I know.

 

I wasn't that crazy about Experiment Perilous.  I didn't like the vibe or the ending.  George Brent can be hit or miss with me.  I wasn't too keen on him in this one.


Really?  Too bad, I found it fascinating.  But then I have really liked every Arch Obler flick I've seen so far.  He has an off-beat, intelligent touch that, like Serling, appeals to me.  He was unique.

 

And I always feel I'm missing something with Arch because others also like him.  But I have not gone for his films.  I thought Five was a good film, but I wanted to like it more.  I really dislike Bewitched and The Arnelo Affair.  I should watch The Twonky.


I'm very surprised you liked it.  Maybe it took them too long to get to New Zealand and Van.  The story itself, as I said, is a classic one.  The book was a massive best seller a la Gone with the Wind and Forever Amber so they gave the production everything they had.

 

I did know it was a popular book but I didn't realize it was that popular.  Van Heflin and Donna Reed are just wonderful in the film.  I went for both of them.  The big reveal with the parents of Marianne (Lana Turner) and Marguerite (Donna) is excellent.  The history between Sophie (Gladys Cooper) and Edmond (Frank Morgan) is wonderful.  All of the love in the film is a mess.  It's all over the place and it really struck a chord with me.

 

Well it's true it's silly but I thought it too short to be draggy. :D

 

That tells you how much The Headless Horseman dragged with me!

 

I don't think I liked this one.

 

What don't you like about Ivy?

 

True---especially the druggy scene on the highway and the surrealistic cinematography.  I just feel it tries a tad too hard.

 

I feel your criticism of Mirage is a valid one.  It does try too hard.  The ending is a little on the "really?" side.  Gregory Peck is so good in these kind of roles that I tend to overlook story flaws because of him.

 

It's a "soft movie" which is why I like it, i guess.  That and the assortment of characters with Geraldine Fitzgerald looking so out of place among them all, which is perfect.  It's the kind of set-up Gable or Cagney would have been cast in ten-fifteen years earlier.

 

Hey, that's an interesting observation.  I believe you are right.  I could definitely see a young Gable and Cagney in such a role.  And I thought Garfield did just fine.  Maybe it was the "softness" that you speak of that kept me at a distance.  I consider Jean Negulesco to be a "soft" director, one that I'm not that crazy about.

 

Now I must admit that though it seem ideal casting, Telly is not the best Blofeld.  I guess he's stronger in either hero or anti-hero roles.  As for Lazenby, I was shocked myself that I didn't mind him much.  He's definitely low on the pole but boy, he sure was fit.  And I thought the ski-bunnies at Blofeld's ski aerie were hilarious. 

 

The ski bunnies were all the flavors of woman!  That's definitely Bond.  Seeing Telly in the skiing scenes was rather painful.  But it's such an upset to know you liked Lazenby!  I could have sworn you'd really dislike him because he seems rather boyish and you certainly go for the manly guys.


I can only imagine all the crazy stuff Sterling was thinking about this one.  I wish I could recall if he wrote much about it in his memoirs, probably not.  He was so disdainful of his own movies with few exceptions.

 

Self-hatred.

 

It's one of ChiO's favorites, if I'm not mistaken.  Joseph Lewis, right?

 

Yes, it's Lewis.  That was a big selling point for me.  I'm not sure if ChiO likes the film but I know he really likes Lewis, so I would guess he liked the film a lot.  And I actually watched Five because ChiO listed it as one of his favorites.


i agree with all that---Bette and Errol are outstanding, Errol particularly is blazingly charismatic.  You really can picture him being a part of a more daring, adventurous century.  He doesn't have to "act" that, he's totally comfortable there and I fully believe he'd have been exactly like that with the real Queen E.

 

Excellent!  I agree with everything you said.  I think Errol's devil-may-care persona probably made the very serious Bette believe he wasn't any good.  But you cannot teach what Errol possessed.  He was truly a natural.  He draws everyone's eyes.  Maybe that's why Bette hated him!

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Good evening Jack-in-the-box!

 

Tortuous is right! :P  I chose to watch the film because of Thelma Ritter.  :)  I do like Fred Astaire, but I can't say this was a film I liked that much.

 

I do LOVE Thelma Ritter in anything she does. She is just SO lovable and cute! She was rather funny in Daddy Long Legs. What did you think of her character?

 

Isn't that why anyone chooses to watch it?

 

You better take that back!!!

 

If you like Astaire, then why didn't you prefer this one? Is it because of the age difference thing? Because, although, yes it is slightly on the odd side, most of his later films were with a much younger co-star.

 

I didn't watch that one!  I watched Will Rogers' Down to Earth, silly.  But I'm sure I'll eventually get to Rita's because I am looking to watch her films.

 

OHHHH!! Well that makes more sense. Heehee! I guess I didn't pay much attention to the year you put with the title. Whoopsie! In case you're interested, I've actually seen this one too. Although I'm not a big Will rogers fan. Grandmama LOVES him and wishes TCM would play more of his unknown films. I actually don't mind this one too much from what I remember, but I watched it long ago.

 

It's my least favorite of the Bond films that I have watched, but it's pretty close to some others.  I just didn't like the story and the finale is too ludicrous for me.  As for Lazenby, I actually liked him.  I thought his sensitive version of Bond was pretty good.  I don't like him more than Sean Connery, of course.  And you should like this Bond!  He gets married, for goodness sake!

 

Ha! I agree with you about the story. It's just not anywhere near the other films and is kind of cheesy in some parts. And just so you know, That's the ONLY part of the movie I liked, was the marriage scene. The whole rest of the film is just too much for me to handle compared to the other Bond films. ***SPOILER*** I mean she dies for crying out loud! WHO DOES THAT?! You know exactly how I feel about that, silly. I told you I walked out of the movie theater when they killed off the love interest in The Dark Knight....and it was just way too freaky for me anyway. Heehee!

 

I mean honestly. Watching that Bond movie went from being cute and sweet, to ripping my heart out!

 

Mirage is one of my favorite pieces of wrok from Diane Baker! I really liked Peck's performance as well and it's just an all around exciting movie to watch. My eyes never wanted to leave the screen when watching it!

 

Now this kind of surprises me.  I don't see you liking these 60s thrillers.  I enjoyed the film.  I also liked Diane.

 

What?! Whatever gave you that idea?

 

Phffft was a good move for Judy Holliday and I always love her with Lemmon anyway.

 

Very good!  Not everyone is a fan of Jack, so I wasn't sure where you stood with him.

 

I like Jack with certain co-stars. His comic talent is pretty sharp. I have my favorites. I think he was a bit underrated on his serious acting skills too.

 

I was disappointed in this one.  I was hoping the combination of Conrad Veidt and Michael Powell would be fantastic.  But I thought the film was underwhelming.  As you say, the film is mostly propaganda.  I thought Veidt's character was drawn too sharply.

 

The film IS very simplistic and underwhelming, I will definitely say that I agree with you there. Did you like anything about it?

 

Did you like the ending?
 

The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex - Okay I procrastinated years to see this one, because I was afraid of what I would think of Bette with all that make-up and her portrayal of Elizabeth. I am very fascinated by the Royal Family history and usually revel in getting to see a film made about any of the members in English history, even if the film is slightly exaggerated or inebriated. Heehee! But I found this one to be interesting, especially compared to the 2005 mini-series "Elizabeth I" that was also based on their relationship. I found myself rather liking Bette and Errol together, very oddly enough. It's almost unbelievable, but that's probably one of the reasons I like it. But it has it's bitter moments for me.

 

What are the bitter moments?  I really liked the film.  I loved the mule-headed love.

 

Of course you liked the mule-headed love. You always do! I already knew you would like this one.

 

The bitterness I speak of is Erool Flynn making Essex out to be somewhat of a hero. The real Essex was an egotistical man who played both sides and took what he wanted with no consequence. And seeing Flynn struggle with that is kind of painful for me. Although, he looks the part. I believe he is Essex. He really captures the look, but other than that, he didn't have Essex's personality down at all for me. But that's just me, personally.

 

You know what? I also forgot about The Conspirators! That's also one of the ones I like from your list. Henreid and Lamarr together are awesome!

 

I got a kick out of seeing a scene that Top Secret! parodied from this film.

 

Ha! I KNEW you would bring up Top Secret!. I think we have discussed this before. I'm glad you are finally talking about it! That makes me so HAPPY!!!!! :P

 

When I first saw this one, I didn't notice that scene until you told me about it. then I watched it over again and had a mini-freak out moment. Heehee! I couldn't believe I had missed that. It was so funny!

 

Did you actually like the film as a whole?

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"This is a test. For the next few seconds, this member will conduct a test of the Emergency Where in the heck has everyone gone System.

This is only a test."

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"This is a test. For the next few seconds, this member will conduct a test of the Emergency Where in the heck has everyone gone System.

This is only a test."

If we don't hear anything soon we may have to launch an emergency.  I may have to go on a search and rescue mission.

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If we don't hear anything soon we may have to launch an emergency.  

 

Well a few of us have been having a pizza party and chatting up Stagecoach out on the Western side of town.. come on over. (I am still taking orders.. ha) 

 

As for the King of All Things GREY.. I can't be SURE.. but I THINK he's still around. He's out there lurking in the shadow's no doubt..  Although he MAY have just stepped outside for little summer night's air.. (stepped out.. was kicked out.. you know.. something like that) :D ha.

 

devil-daniel-webster-trial-183.jpg

 

I may have to go on a search and rescue mission

 

Search and rescue mission...  Necktie party.. You know.. something like that. :D HA! 

 

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I hate to bring up a potentially sore subject ;-) but are some of our faves doing a lot of time over at that other place, the Oasis. I don't fault them, I love them wherever they are, but how about a hello once in a while. :-) The new software might be a factor as well. I think we lost a few overall in TCM Land here due to that.

 

And as Ro says, there's pizza down in Western Rambles, Genre Thread way down there in the hinterlands, where a discussion of Stagecoach, a flick almost everyone loves, is in the nascent stages ... so there is time to view and mull over, then to come on down and start airing those views ...the more the merrier (to coin a phrase) ... meanwhile, there's a full campfire and great pizza, not exactly fare that one might see on the range, but heck we're not on the range (when it comes to food anyway)

 

:P

 

---

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but heck we're not on the range

 

HA! No.. but if the Grey Dude doesn't show up soon.. we may have to put HIM on the range.. by the seat of his pants, perhaps. :D:P

 

BE004114.jpg

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but heck we're not on the range

 

HA! No.. but if the Grey Dude doesn't show up soon.. we may have to put HIM on the range.. by the seat of his pants, perhaps. :D:P

 

BE004114.jpg

 

Ro, I don't know your avatar but that woman looks to really mean business. I don't think I would mess with her. That Scott (yes, Scott and Great Scott, one and the same) better make an appearance around her pronto pronto, or it might get ugly.

 

:D

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Ro, I don't know your avatar but that woman looks to really mean business. I don't think I would mess with her. 

 

That is my beloved little Janey Darwell, Mr. Pirate Guy.. she's a personal favorite of mine. I found that pic of her years ago when I googled something else about her (can't remember what) and I just sort of latched onto it.I have searched high and low to figure out what movie the picture is from.. but to no avail. (it might even be from a TV show, but I just am not sure)

 

Anyway.. I just think it's a fun picture. That look on her face suits the Peacemaker in me to a "T"  ha, so when I found out we could add an avatar, after the big upgrade.. ha, she was my very first choice :D

 

it might get ugly.

 

It NEEDS to get ugly, ha. It's been a good long while (too, too long)  since the Grey Dude and I went round and round. I haven't had a good ole' fashioned mud fight with him in ages. If he doesn't show up soon.. I am going to have to pull out all the items in my arsenal (my frozen rope, my hatpin.. even the giant OCTOPUS!)  and give him what for! :D

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Ro, I don't know your avatar but that woman looks to really mean business. I don't think I would mess with her. 

 

That is my beloved little Janey Darwell, Mr. Pirate Guy.. she's a personal favorite of mine. I found that pic of her years ago when I googled something else about her (can't remember what) and I just sort of latched onto it.I have searched high and low to figure out what movie the picture is from.. but to no avail. (it might even be from a TV show, but I just am not sure)

 

Anyway.. I just think it's a fun picture. That look on her face suits the Peacemaker in me to a "T"  ha, so when I found out we could add an avatar, after the big upgrade.. ha, she was my very first choice :D

 

it might get ugly.

 

It NEEDS to get ugly, ha. It's been a good long while (too, too long)  since the Grey Dude and I went round and round. I haven't had a good ole' fashioned mud fight with him in ages. If he doesn't show up soon.. I am going to have to pull out all the items in my arsenal (my frozen rope, my hatpin.. even the giant OCTOPUS!)  and give him what for! :D

 

On second thought, Janie might be a fairy princess next to you

;););)

 

So that was Janie in Ox-bow, tough as nails, that one. Gosh, Ro, it would be great to find out where this picture is from. Have you thought about posting this picture in INFORMATION and asking. There are folks around here who are really sharp about these things. This fellow METZ would probably know, or FREDCDOBBS. Anyway, please think about it, I'm curious too. We need to find this out ...

 

Meanwhile, I'll pray for this Grey Guy you keep referring to ...

;)

 

You know, Ro, now that I know you really like Janey, she doesn't look so mean. She looks like she knows her way around that kitchen too. If she's a master cuisiniere like you are, I might even put up with her. (as if she would even have a stupid ole pirate dude)

 

===

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