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JakeHolman

SCIENCE, NATURE, HISTORY & CULTURE

966 posts in this topic

49 minutes ago, JakeHolman said:

 

 

What's nice, if it enters Earth's atmosphere, everyone will have a front row seat of the end. 

Dig out the popcorn.

asteroidEarth_CfA4X3.jpg

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On 6/17/2018 at 7:27 AM, Gershwin fan said:

 

 

That is a microburst or "rain bomb". The violent downward blast of air can bring down aircraft like Delta Flight 191 on  August 2, 1985.

Delta%20191(2)

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http://www.scmp.com/news/asia/australasia/article/2151405/puan-worlds-oldest-sumatran-orangutan-dies-aged-62

Puan, the world’s oldest Sumatran orangutan, dies aged 62

Puan lived well beyond her typical life expectancy and was recognised by the Guinness World Records as the oldest verified member of her species in 2016

The world’s oldest Sumatran orangutan, which had 11 children and 54 descendants spread across the globe, has died aged 62, Australian zoo officials said Tuesday.

 

Puan – Indonesian for “lady” – died on Monday at Perth Zoo, where she had lived since being gifted by Malaysia in 1968.

“She did so much for the colony at Perth Zoo and the survival of her species,” said primate supervisor Holly Thompson.

“Apart from being the oldest member of our colony, she was also the founding member of our world-renowned breeding programme and leaves an incredible legacy.

“Her genetics count for just under 10 per cent of the global zoological population.”

Puan had 11 children and a total of 54 descendants in the United States, Europe, Australasia and the jungles of Sumatra.

 
 
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https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-44388038

Gene-edited farm animals are on their way

Scientists have created pigs that are immune to one of the world's costliest livestock diseases.

The team edited the animals' DNA to make them resist the deadly respiratory disease known as PRRS - a move that could prevent billions of pounds in losses each year.

However, consumers have traditionally been reluctant to eat genetically altered animals and crops.

This poses a significant barrier to farmers owning gene-edited pigs.

And because genome, or gene, editing (GE) is relatively new, the absence of regulation currently prevents their sale anyway.

GE is different to the more widely used technology of genetic modification. The former involves the precise alteration of an organism's DNA, while the latter is characterised by the introduction of foreign genetic sequences into another living thing.

The pig research also raises animal welfare issues. Critics say that creating disease-resistant animals will discourage farmers from improving the welfare of their livestock. Some think that the way the animals are kept can make them less prone to contracting the virus that causes PRRS.

PRRS, which stands for Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome, can cause breathing problems and death in young pigs.

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https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jun/21/cocaine-in-rivers-harming-endangered-eels-study-finds

Tests show drug causes eels to become hyperactive and damages their muscles, possibly hindering their ability to migrate

Tiny amounts of cocaine flushed into rivers cause eels to become not only hyperactive but to suffer from muscle wastage, impaired gills and hormonal changes, a study has found.

The impact of traces of cocaine on the physiology of European eels could be hindering their epic migrations through the oceans to reproduce, according to researchers who examined the impact of the drug.

The tiny concentrations of cocaine in the laboratory tests are equivalent to the trace levels found in rivers and water systems from illegal drug use, particularly near major cities.

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