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JakeHolman

SCIENCE, NATURE, HISTORY & CULTURE

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https://theconversation.com/orangutans-have-been-adapting-to-humans-for-70-000-years-99036

file-20180628-117430-x5z519.jpg?ixlib=rb

If you are very lucky you might have seen an orangutan in the wild. Most people have only seen them on television. In either case the animal was probably deep in some remote forest, as yet untainted by people. This is the image we associate with these critically endangered animals: vulnerable, dependent on pristine habitats, and incapable of coexisting with people. But that view may be wrong.

Until recently, our ideas about conservation were constrained by romantic notions of “wild” nature and our limited grasp of just how adaptable and robust nature can be. Yet understanding how prolonged exposure to humans has impacted even well-studied species can help overturn assumptions about them and make conservation more effective. The orangutan is a good example.

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But we may have misjudged the orangutan. That’s the conclusion of research we have just published, together with co-authors, in Science Advances. Rather than being an ecologically-fragile ape, there is evidence that orangutans have long been adapting to humans. The modern orangutan is the product of both environmental and human impacts, and where they live and how they act appear to reflect our shared history.

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47 minutes ago, JakeHolman said:

 

 

Excerpt...

The shield will prevent the core of the spacecraft from being exposed to temperatures reaching nearly 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit (or or roughly 1,370 degrees Celsius). Provided the shield does its job, NASA believes the instruments "will be kept at a relatively comfortable temperature of about 85 degrees Fahrenheit."

 

If it was a small planet, the dark side will be under -300.

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https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-44519189

What happens if someone catches the Loch Ness Monster?

A Scottish government-funded body has a plan in place if the Loch Ness Monster should ever be found.

Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) prepared the "partly serious, partly fun" code of practice in 2001 amid a period of intense interest in Nessie.

This year's interest has been piqued by scientists gathering DNA from the loch, and Scotland's first minister saying she believes there is a monster.

SNH said it would "dust off" the plan if Nessie was discovered.

The code of practice was drawn up to offer protection to new species found in the loch, including a monster.

It stipulates that a DNA sample should be taken from any new creature, and then it should be released back into the loch.

_102402244_mediaitem102401981.jpg

The story of the monster can be traced back 1,500 years when Irish missionary St Columba is said to have encountered a beast in the River Ness in 565AD.

Later, in the 1930s, The Inverness Courier reported the first modern sighting of Nessie.

The creature's appearance has been described as resembling a plesiosaur, a creature that died out with the dinosaurs.

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18 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-44519189

What happens if someone catches the Loch Ness Monster?

A Scottish government-funded body has a plan in place if the Loch Ness Monster should ever be found.

Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) prepared the "partly serious, partly fun" code of practice in 2001 amid a period of intense interest in Nessie.

This year's interest has been piqued by scientists gathering DNA from the loch, and Scotland's first minister saying she believes there is a monster.

SNH said it would "dust off" the plan if Nessie was discovered.

The code of practice was drawn up to offer protection to new species found in the loch, including a monster.

It stipulates that a DNA sample should be taken from any new creature, and then it should be released back into the loch.

_102402244_mediaitem102401981.jpg

The story of the monster can be traced back 1,500 years when Irish missionary St Columba is said to have encountered a beast in the River Ness in 565AD.

Later, in the 1930s, The Inverness Courier reported the first modern sighting of Nessie.

The creature's appearance has been described as resembling a plesiosaur, a creature that died out with the dinosaurs.

 

Problem...there is no Loch Ness MONSTER.  The entire body of water if dredged contains only about a ton of sea life.  What is it going to feed on.  Second, the key for any species...breeding population.

Like the so called Bigfoot / Yeti may turn out to be an animal we already know.  Sick of the hoaxes, people seeing floating debris, seals, birds, wakes and scream Oh look Nellie!

By the way, the photo...

Surgeon+Model.jpg

 

 

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42 minutes ago, hamradio said:

 

Problem...there is no Loch Ness MONSTER.  The entire body of water if dredged contains only about a ton of sea life.  What is it going to feed on.  Second, the key for any species...breeding population.

Like the so called Bigfoot / Yeti may turn out to be an animal we already know.  Sick of the hoaxes, people seeing floating debris, seals, birds, wakes and scream Oh look Nellie!

By the way, the photo...

Surgeon+Model.jpg

 

 

Yeah, I know the photo is a fake but I posted it because it is in the article. While I agree that the chances of there being no Loch Ness Monster are high, Scotland's Minister believes he's real. If it turns out a new species is real it could mean a lot in the scientific community.

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