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NickAndNora34

NickAndNora34's Disney Movie Journey

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I have decided to go back and watch/re-watch all of Disney's animated and live action movies in order by release year (except for Disney Channel Original Movies & straight-to-video sequels), so I thought I would go ahead and start a thread in case anyone is interested and wants to see my reviews and trivia as I progress. If anyone wants to contribute to this, feel free. I'm mainly just doing this, because I think it could be interesting to maybe 1 or 2 people on this site lol. 

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1. SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS (1937) 

Snow White is not my favorite Disney princess (or character, for that matter) by far, but I appreciate the history behind the production of this movie, and the fact that it was Walt Disney's first feature length film. It is interesting to see how the animation style depends on the type of movie that is being produced. This is a princess movie, so the animation is somewhat softer (except for the scary forest scenes), and uses lighter colors than "Dumbo" (1941). "Dumbo" is primarily set in a circus, so a lot of primary colors are used (red, blue, yellow, etc.) It's interesting to see how the type of movie matches the overall color scheme and/or animation style. 

Apparently, Walt Disney wrote up a strict contract for Adriana Caselotti (the voice of Snow White), in which it stated that she was not allowed to voice or sing for any other major characters due to the fact that she was recognizable (this mainly had to do with preserving the magic and keeping that character integrity intact). 

In order to do the "Old Hag" voice, actress Lucille La Verne (who also voiced the Evil Queen in her more tame state) simply took out her teeth! 😋

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Image result for snow white and the seven dwarfs 1937

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And if you need help finding some of the obscure 50's-60's live-actions, may I recommend Vudu VOD rental as probably one of the most comprehensive archive of "lost" Disney films available on the Net?  (Unless you know of another place to watch "The Sword & the Rose", "Emil & the Detectives", "Moon Pilot" and "Best of True-Life Adventures"?)

And if Snow's "Betty Boop voice" and tendency to giggle bothers you, keep in mind, the character in the original Grimm tale was a little 10-12 yo. girl.  The studio decided to make her 16 for more romantic interest (yes, she is technically the youngest Disney princess behind Ariel, Rapunzel and Jasmine), but that she still had a "child-like" way of looking at things, for the benefit of the original story.

Apparently, Walt Disney wrote up a strict contract for Adriana Caselotti (the voice of Snow White), in which it stated that she was not allowed to voice or sing for any other major characters due to the fact that she was recognizable (this mainly had to do with preserving the magic and keeping that character integrity intact). 

Although, of course, that contract didn't apply to MGM:

wizardofoz-movie-screencaps.com-5015.jpg.ba909a3a786a0882f507d6078b095856.jpg

"...Wherefore art thou, Romeo?"

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#2: FANTASIA (1940) 

I like to refer to this one as a "love letter to classical music." This is a nice animated tribute to classical composers/musicians. The film starts out with orchestra members tuning their instruments and getting ready for the "show," so to speak. The animation tells various stories: my favorites are the Sorcerer Mickey sequence and the Ostrich/Hippo ballet sequence to the tune of "Dance of the Hours" by Amilcare Ponchielli (aka "Hello Muddah, Hello Faddah by Allan Sherman). 

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A few highlights: 

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That Mickey photo is one of my favorite animated images. I love how the color blue and the stars go together. 

Overall, this probably isn't one of my favorite Disney movies, but I enjoyed re-watching it (in full) after so many years. I would recommend watching this for the animation, even if you aren't a fan of classical music. The animation is very cute with pegasus, mushrooms, fairies, and hippos, but also quite scary towards the end with the Chernabog, AKA the Demon Lord of Bald Mountain, and all his demon minions. 

 

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7 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

#2: FANTASIA (1940) 

(Not to be your nagging conscience, but...?)

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

(Not to be your nagging conscience, but...?)

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I know Pinocchio was released before Fantasia, but I'm watching them based on release year, not actual date (if this is what you're referring to). The 2 were released the same year, just in February and November, respectively. I found Pinocchio after I was about halfway through Fantasia. From now on, I may try to watch as close to true chronological order as possible. 

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#3: PINOCCHIO (1940)

This movie follows a carpenter/clock-maker named Gepetto who wishes for a son after building a wooden puppet in the form of a small boy and naming it Pinocchio. His wish is then granted by the Blue Fairy while he is asleep, except for the fact that Pinocchio is still made of wood. The Blue Fairy gives Pinocchio a cricket named Jiminy to act as his conscience until she deems him good enough to be turned into a real boy. 

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Everything goes downhill when Pinocchio ventures out the following morning to go to school, and is tricked by a fox named Honest John, and his feline sidekick, Gideon.

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 Long story short, Pinocchio gets captured by a con-man named Stromboli (who might just be one of the scariest/most ruthless Disney villains ever) and eventually escapes with the help of the Blue Fairy, only to be tricked by Honest John and Gideon a SECOND time.

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He ends up at Pleasure Island with all of the other "bad" little boys and gets partially turned into a donkey before he escapes the island to find his father, Gepetto, who has been swallowed by a whale (Monstro).

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Above are Gepetto's pets, Figaro and Cleo ("She's my little water baby, isn't she cute?"). Both of them are adorable. 

One thing I never noticed was that there are a few scenes/music that are taken from the movie and used for the nightly show "Fantasmic" at both the Disneyland Resort and Walt Disney World park. 

Marge Champion served as the live-action role model for the Blue Fairy; an interesting tidbit of information:

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This one was definitely more scary than I remember... An enjoyable movie, if not headache-inducing from Pinocchio's constant idiocy and naivete (but then again, I guess he really doesn't have a brain or heart, and that's what Jiminy is for). I don't dislike Pinocchio, believe me; I mainly felt sad for him when he kept listening to everything strangers were telling him. 

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Love it, NickAndNora!

I agree when watching early Disney animated movies, they have pretty scary parts. I think what makes Stromboli so scary is his large & strong movement. The evil Queen from Snow White was a quiet controlled evil that scares your mind, but Stromboli is physically scary.

What I really love about these early animated films is the artistry (in spades in FANTASIA) that Disney (the man) had encouraged from his staff. There are many moments in BAMBI showing the seasons in the woods that make me cry they are so sweet and beautiful. The collaborative artistry is breathtaking.
I know some Disney animators and they don't get to express their immense talent through their work at all. Instead, they are technicians with knowledge of art, more than artists allowed to create.
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I have a fairly good collection of old Disney myself.  All on old VHS tapes.  Sounds like a good way to spend some rainy days, and I too, might take up that endeavor.  ;)  

But I'll not take any notes, nor bother anyone with my personal "reviews" since we all have our own feelings about many of these old movies and I don't wish to start any heated discussions or arguments.  I'll only now(so far) mention that I can't think of ANY segment of FANTASIA that I like more OR less than any other, and that it took me MANY years to find a "Nutcracker Suite" recording done by Stokowski that contained a similar rendition of "Dance of the sugar plum fairy" as did the film.  All my other recordings had it performed at a much faster pace.

And I'll also say, as it IS one of my favorite Beethoven symphonies, the film's 6th symphony segment is favored too.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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On 4/28/2018 at 3:08 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

#3: PINOCCHIO (1940)

An enjoyable movie, if not headache-inducing from Pinocchio's constant idiocy and naivete (but then again, I guess he really doesn't have a brain or heart, and that's what Jiminy is for). I don't dislike Pinocchio, believe me; I mainly felt sad for him when he kept listening to everything strangers were telling him. 

In the original Carlo Collodi book, Pinocchio is a mischievous Bart Simpson, who likes causing trouble because he can, and has to learn right from wrong--Walt didn't find the character appealing, and it took months of rewriting the story to make him more of a sympathetic naive character and give the episodic book some actual A->B plotline.

In fact, Italy nationalistically HATES us for liking the Disney movie over the book.  (Check out the weird '02 book-faithful Roberto Benigni version, if you want to get some idea how crazy and incoherent the original was.)  Seriously.  Anything from the war?...No.  But get them started on Pinocchio being nice and Jiminy Cricket as a central character in the story?

13 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I agree when watching early Disney animated movies, they have pretty scary parts. I think what makes Stromboli so scary is his large & strong movement. The evil Queen from Snow White was a quiet controlled evil that scares your mind, but Stromboli is physically scary.

When Stromboli locks Pinocchio in a cage and storms out, "Shaddup, before I knocka you silly!", at that age, we're thinking, "Whoa...This is bad.  No one ever says they're going to hit a Disney character.  😮 "

As for the Fox, one story I'd read was that when Walt liked a character on storyboards, he would ham it up and start acting out the story in person as he got ideas--He started working out so much of the Fox's stylish cane-twirling, if you look at the character, he's got a distinctly Walt-like look to the eyebrows.

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Also, can't recall the designer's name, but Snow White and Pinocchio were the two films from one Disney artist who created the production design for stories where everything was creatively carved out of wood--Just look at the Dwarves' hand-carved furniture and Gepetto's clocks.

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With the death of director Michael Anderson at 98, I'm reminded that his son, Michael Anderson, Jr. (along with Hayley Mills) was in my favorite live-action Disney film: In Search of the Castaways. Great adventure film.

 

 

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#4: DUMBO  (1941) 

One of my favorite animated characters is Dumbo, himself. I enjoy this movie because the production team did a great job of keeping it clear and concise. The overall run time is only 1 hour and 4 minutes. Keep it short, and to the point. I appreciate the decision not to take a shorter story and stretch it into something longer and less meaningful. 

The film starts out with all the storks delivering babies to all the circus animals (except for Mrs. Jumbo, the elephant, as her stork is late). The stork eventually arrives and delivers Jumbo, Junior to Mrs. Jumbo and her catty "friends," but after seeing his enormous ears, these so-called "friends" start to poke fun at the baby elephant and decide to dub him "Dumbo."

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Dumbo gets ridiculed by children who visit the circus and Mrs. Jumbo defends him, which forces the circus staff to shut her up in a train car and call her "mad." Dumbo visits his mother on occasion, and on one of these occasions she sings the song "Baby Mine" to him (which never fails to make me somewhat emotional). 

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Dumbo meets a mouse named Timothy, who befriends him, and starts to act as a sort of manager for Dumbo.

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Timothy tries to come up with an act that will suit Dumbo, and in the meantime, the circus ringmaster has Dumbo perform as a clown (which only results in disaster). 

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The film starts to wrap up as Dumbo and Timothy consume alcohol and thus, the "Pink Elephants on Parade" sequence was born. I have no idea whose idea it was to have a baby elephant and a mouse get inebriated in a children's animated film, but there it is. 

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While in a drunken stupor, Dumbo uses his ears to fly up into a nearby tree (while carrying Timothy) and the two awake to the sounds of ravens singing "When I See an Elephant Fly." Timothy and the ravens encourage Dumbo to return to the circus and perform by using his ears to fly; their reasoning is that people will not laugh at him, but will, instead, be in awe of him. Dumbo returns to the circus and ultimately becomes an international sensation. 

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*TRIVIA* 

Singer Betty Noyes sang the lullaby, "Baby Mine" for this film. You might remember her from dubbing Debbie Reynolds (ironically) in Singin' in the Rain (1952)

Animator Bill Tytla worked not only on the character of Dumbo, but also Grumpy (the dwarf), Stromboli (Pinocchio), and the Chernabog (Fantasia). 

Dickie Jones (voice of Pinocchio) was briefly considered to play Dumbo, but Walt decided to go in a different direction and not give the character any dialogue. 

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I find that while I appreciate their artistry and history, the early Disney movies never make my shortlist of favorite Disney films.  I'm not particularly a big fan of Pinocchio, but I do like when they get eaten by Monstro.  I also like the scenes with Jiminy Cricket and the Blue Fairy.

I love Dumbo.  I haven't seen it in forever, but I especially remember the scene with Dumbo's mom singing the "Baby Mine."  I see that you didn't mention the black crows scene o.O Early Disney movies have quite a few moments in them that now seem racist.  The Native Americans in Peter Pan for example.  Woah.  Of course, these films are a product of their time, so these somewhat unsavory scenes don't bother me. 

Re: Fantasia.  I used to have this movie on VHS in the 80s.  Of course as a kindergartener/first grader, I thought this movie was horribly boring and I only watched it once.  I should re-watch it now as a 33-year old and see if I enjoy it more.  When I was little, my favorite part was the part with the dinosaurs.  I would occasionally put Fantasia into the VCR and fast forward to the dinosaur part and just watch that one scene. 

I'm guessing that you're watching Bambi next? I had that film on VHS too and I didn't watch it very often because it was so sad! I should re-watch that one too.  I haven't seen Bambi in probably 25 years!

Edit: Now I feel like I need to do this challenge with you lol.  There are so many Disney movies that I haven't seen in such a long time.  The most recent ones I watched were Cinderella and Beauty and the Beast.  I also just saw Coco, but I think that is Pixar?

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15 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

1.I find that while I appreciate their artistry and history, the early Disney movies never make my shortlist of favorite Disney films.  I'm not particularly a big fan of Pinocchio, but I do like when they get eaten by Monstro.  I also like the scenes with Jiminy Cricket and the Blue Fairy.

2. I love Dumbo.  I haven't seen it in forever, but I especially remember the scene with Dumbo's mom singing the "Baby Mine."  I see that you didn't mention the black crows scene o.O Early Disney movies have quite a few moments in them that now seem racist.  The Native Americans in Peter Pan for example.  Woah.  Of course, these films are a product of their time, so these somewhat unsavory scenes don't bother me. 

3. Re: Fantasia.  I used to have this movie on VHS in the 80s.  Of course as a kindergartener/first grader, I thought this movie was horribly boring and I only watched it once.  I should re-watch it now as a 33-year old and see if I enjoy it more.  When I was little, my favorite part was the part with the dinosaurs.  I would occasionally put Fantasia into the VCR and fast forward to the dinosaur part and just watch that one scene. 

4. I'm guessing that you're watching Bambi next? I had that film on VHS too and I didn't watch it very often because it was so sad! I should re-watch that one too.  I haven't seen Bambi in probably 25 years!

5. Edit: Now I feel like I need to do this challenge with you lol.  There are so many Disney movies that I haven't seen in such a long time.  The most recent ones I watched were Cinderella and Beauty and the Beast.  I also just saw Coco, but I think that is Pixar?

1. Exactly my sentiments. When thinking "Disney," I don't think of 1937-1949 at all. "Dumbo" would probably be the one I most like from that entire time period. As for "Pinocchio," I also would have to agree. Jiminy Cricket is one of my favorite characters of all time. 

2. I didn't have the energy to write about the crows lol (or the time, since I typed it up before church this morning). As you say, they are "products of their time." Do I wish they had gone in different directions? Yes. But I can recognize that these caricatures can be found to be offensive, but I am not personally offended by them, if that makes sense. 

3. I still find this a chore to get through. I would recommend re-watching it as an adult to see if your opinions have changed. 

4. Yes, "Bambi" is next. Although, it is my personal opinion that after Bambi's mother bites the bullet the final half of the movie is forgettable. Yes, I know the animals grow up, fall in love,* and there is a fire. 

5. I neglected to mention that I am also including Pixar movies in this challenge of mine. My younger brother told me he thought "Coco" was "horrible," so needless to say, I only have 1 brother now...

 

*twitterpated 

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On 4/26/2018 at 6:44 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

1. SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS (1937) 

Snow White is not my favorite Disney princess (or character, for that matter) by far, but I appreciate the history behind the production of this movie, and the fact that it was Walt Disney's first feature length film. It is interesting to see how the animation style depends on the type of movie that is being produced. This is a princess movie, so the animation is somewhat softer (except for the scary forest scenes), and uses lighter colors than "Dumbo" (1941). "Dumbo" is primarily set in a circus, so a lot of primary colors are used (red, blue, yellow, etc.) It's interesting to see how the type of movie matches the overall color scheme and/or animation style. 

Apparently, Walt Disney wrote up a strict contract for Adriana Caselotti (the voice of Snow White), in which it stated that she was not allowed to voice or sing for any other major characters due to the fact that she was recognizable (this mainly had to do with preserving the magic and keeping that character integrity intact). 

In order to do the "Old Hag" voice, actress Lucille La Verne (who also voiced the Evil Queen in her more tame state) simply took out her teeth! 😋

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Purchased the "Snow White" Platinum Edition DVD set in 2003,   The Disney vault showed the original soundtrack 78 (knew what to look for) and got interested in acquiring it which I did in short order. Learned by comparison why sound on film was so superior to anything people had at home. Talk about a difference, comparing a 1980's vinyl  vs CD  is not that dramatic!

Didn't know at the time it was the very first movie soundtrack ever released.

Found a NOS set that was protected over the decades by a protective  multipage storybook / jacket

19ebd74a-6b03-11e6-8ac1-3a3d67aaec71.jpg

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The 3 disc yellow label 78.

1938+03+British+OST+11+Disc+Someday+My+P

 

Singles were on the black label Victor 78.

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1 hour ago, NickAndNora34 said:

2. I didn't have the energy to write about the crows lol (or the time, since I typed it up before church this morning). As you say, they are "products of their time." Do I wish they had gone in different directions? Yes. But I can recognize that these caricatures can be found to be offensive, but I am not personally offended by them, if that makes sense. 

I've become a big fan of the radio Amos & Andy (it got better after it became a major CBS show in '42, and then it gets hilarious), and the crows bear an awful darn resemblance to the major A&A characters, with the lead crow a dead ringer for Andy...Although not the characters, of course, to avoid lawsuits.  And yes, they're not depicted offensively, and are even the few (only?) friends the two characters do have.

When I was an NYU student roaming around Washington Square in the early 80's, I remember a little streetcorner black doo-woop group doing their own tribute to the Dumbo crows with overhead puppets of the characters (this, back when almost no one watched the movie anymore, largely because of that)--I'd thought it was clever, and when I saw them later turn up on David Letterman's show, I'd guessed they'd managed to get a decent break at that time.  If anyone else remembers this, darn, I couldn't find a YouTube clip.

1 hour ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Fantasia

3. I still find this a chore to get through. I would recommend re-watching it as an adult to see if your opinions have changed. 

The restoration on disk with the "concert" staging and Deems Taylor has a little more highbrow appeal than the quick popular Disney version I grew up with as a kid--It's easier to understand the opening Toccata & Fugue segment with the explanation, but the "Rite of Spring" dinosaurs still nearly drag the movie to a halt.  

Just about every other segment still works on a visually syncopated level with the music, though, even if the lack of story takes getting used to.  I'd post the Nutcracker Suite again, if Sepiatone hadn't done it already.

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Don't forget The Reluctant Dragon starring Robert Benchley and with Alan Ladd posing as an animator story man.

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8 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I find that while I appreciate their artistry and history, the early Disney movies never make my shortlist of favorite Disney films.  I'm not particularly a big fan of Pinocchio, but I do like when they get eaten by Monstro.  I also like the scenes with Jiminy Cricket and the Blue Fairy.

I love Dumbo.  I haven't seen it in forever, but I especially remember the scene with Dumbo's mom singing the "Baby Mine."  I see that you didn't mention the black crows scene o.O Early Disney movies have quite a few moments in them that now seem racist.  The Native Americans in Peter Pan for example.  Woah.  Of course, these films are a product of their time, so these somewhat unsavory scenes don't bother me. 

Re: Fantasia.  I used to have this movie on VHS in the 80s.  Of course as a kindergartener/first grader, I thought this movie was horribly boring and I only watched it once.  I should re-watch it now as a 33-year old and see if I enjoy it more.  When I was little, my favorite part was the part with the dinosaurs.  I would occasionally put Fantasia into the VCR and fast forward to the dinosaur part and just watch that one scene. 

I'm guessing that you're watching Bambi next? I had that film on VHS too and I didn't watch it very often because it was so sad! I should re-watch that one too.  I haven't seen Bambi in probably 25 years!

Edit: Now I feel like I need to do this challenge with you lol.  There are so many Disney movies that I haven't seen in such a long time.  The most recent ones I watched were Cinderella and Beauty and the Beast.  I also just saw Coco, but I think that is Pixar?

re: your FANTASIA opine:

What would bother me when this movie would "make the rounds" occasionally is that newspapers would advertise it's showings by printing a picture of MICKEY MOUSE from the "Sorcerer's Apprentice" segment, and unknowing and unwitting parents would bring their rambunctious pre-schoolers to the theater thinking they were taking their kids to see a Mickey Mouse cartoon.  And of course, like you, the kids got bored and noisily whined in their discontent and the sound of the movie would be drowned out by the constant annoyed sounding "hushes" of the angered parents.   And BTW----

"Pink Elephants on Parade" and the scene in which Dumbo visits his imprisoned mom have long competed for the #1 spot of my favorite moments from that movie. 

As an old "stoner" I have to say "Pink Elephants On Parade" while in the throes of mescaline is an experience that words to describe are evasive.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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10 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

re: your FANTASIA opine:

What would bother me when this movie would "make the rounds" occasionally is that newspapers would advertise it's showings by printing a picture of MICKEY MOUSE from the "Sorcerer's Apprentice" segment, and unknowing and unwitting parents would bring their rambunctious pre-schoolers to the theater thinking they were taking their kids to see a Mickey Mouse cartoon.  And of course, like you, the kids got bored and noisily whined in their discontent and the sound of the movie would be drowned out by the constant annoyed sounding "hushes" of the angered parents. 

At least you got to see it with 80's Mickey-marketing--

In my day, growing up, the studio had pretty much written the movie off as a "flop" (still over Walt's complaints that the chopped-up RKO small-town release had bombed), and sent "Fantasia" into college-theater "exile" where you would always--always--see it in double-features with fellow Walt-era "flop" Alice in Wonderland.  Needless to say, mushrooms and caterpillar-hookahs were featured very prominently on the advertising poster.  😓

What brought it back into respectability again was the big 50th-anniversary marketing:  Michael Eisner, still new in the late-80's, wanted and needed New Disney to sequelize an Old-Disney title, and Fantasia was one of the only three they thought they could work with.  Eisner dug up Walt's old 40's memo of "We can drop old segments, put in new ones, change it around every year", and originally planned "Fantasia Revisited" as literally the replacement for the "unpopular" '40 film.  When the 50th-anniversary VHS release advertised "The original, on sale for the very last time!....they MEANT it.  

Film buffs went into full PANIC mode--I remember buying two copies, just in case one ever tangled.  Preservation-supporters who thought they were buying VHS tapes to "preserve in case of the Apocalypse" now had one big fat example right in their laps, and you bought the tape whether you'd ever seen it or not.  Fortunately, this was also around the same time as Disney had a creative accounting loophole that let them count same-year VHS sales in with the theatrical-revival grosses and when they released headlines that "Fantasia had outgrossed Terminator 2!", it improved the original's reputation with the company considerably.

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I love the crows in Dumbo. Many of us of Generation X didn't understand what was so bad about them in our youth. Likewise, I viewed the Golden Book story adaptations of Song Of The South as just another group of funny animals who only differed from the others by talking with a lot more mis-spelled words on the printed page. Kids learning to read got confused over what "ain' dat sumpthin" meant.  Saw that one in the theaters during two reissues in the seventies and early eighties before it got locked away in the vaults. Intriguingly, the '30s antebellum Shirley Temple movies aired the same decades on TV syndication were far worse than James Baskett singing with a frog and Brer Bear saying there ain't nothing in here except beeeez.

Perhaps the most offensive scene in an old Disney feature was the "dark" centaur-ette aiding the "white" one in Fantasia, but very few of us ever got to see HER. Instead, all VHS and DVD copies blew up the scenes in question so that you can only view half of the frame with her blocked off.

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On 4/26/2018 at 3:23 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

I have decided to go back and watch/re-watch all of Disney's animated and live action movies in order by release year (except for Disney Channel Original Movies & straight-to-video sequels), so I thought I would go ahead and start a thread in case anyone is interested and wants to see my reviews and trivia as I progress. If anyone wants to contribute to this, feel free. I'm mainly just doing this, because I think it could be interesting to maybe 1 or 2 people on this site lol. 

I have sorta (okay, not sorta, have) copied you and borrowed Snow White, Pinocchio and Fantasia from the library.  Lol! 

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12 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I have sorta (okay, not sorta, have) copied you and borrowed Snow White, Pinocchio and Fantasia from the library.  Lol! 

*GASP* The audacity! 

In all actuality though, it's always very fun to go back and re-watch films you haven't seen for several years. Especially childhood films :)

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Adding a little humor to this thread, about 10 years ago a member posted this and saved it.  (It's still on the internet. :huh:)

Disneyland Memorial **** from The Realist May 1967.

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(Word filter are you KIDDING me!?:wacko:)

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I'm watching 'Snow White' right now.  The animation is gorgeous.  I will say that the dwarves work in the most amazing gem mine! Talk about easy pickins'.

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