NickAndNora34

NickAndNora34's Disney Movie Journey

116 posts in this topic

5 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Wow.  I must have completely blocked out Dinosaur.  Even looking at the DVD cover, it still doesn't ring a bell.  I've heard of Treasure Planet but I haven't seen it.  I also haven't seen Lilo & Stitch.  

I recall Dinosaur as being the first Disney film that I saw on DVD, but I cannot remember a single detail about the movie itself.

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45 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I recall Dinosaur as being the first Disney film that I saw on DVD, but I cannot remember a single detail about the movie itself.

I cannot even remember this movie being in the theater, lining the shelves of the video store, nothing.  I had no idea this even existed until it was mentioned here on the board.  Now I'm sure I'll see copies of it everywhere next time I'm at one of my used DVD haunts.  I'm reading about Dinosaur on Wikipedia.  Apparently it came out in October of 2000.  I would have been a junior in high school at that time.  Maybe it wasn't on my radar then? But I feel like I should have seen a million copies of it at the video store when it came out on video.  I cannot remember it at all. 

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

I cannot even remember this movie being in the theater, lining the shelves of the video store, nothing.  I had no idea this even existed until it was mentioned here on the board.  Now I'm sure I'll see copies of it everywhere next time I'm at one of my used DVD haunts.  I'm reading about Dinosaur on Wikipedia.  Apparently it came out in October of 2000.  I would have been a junior in high school at that time.  Maybe it wasn't on my radar then? But I feel like I should have seen a million copies of it at the video store when it came out on video.  I cannot remember it at all. 

Yeah, I saw on Wikipedia that it said that Dinosaur was the most expensive movie released that year! I didn't recall that fact, but I do recall that the DVD was one of those double-thickness cases that were common for multi-disc releases in the early days of DVD. I can't find a picture of the case by itself, but here it is in a Disney box-set, and you can see that it's double-sized.

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Speaking about Dinosaur, it is the only one of the now -official 56 Disney (not including Pixar) animated films that I have not seen. I definitely remember all the trailers on the VHS tapes, but I never bothered with seeing the film.

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17 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Wow.  I must have completely blocked out Dinosaur.  Even looking at the DVD cover, it still doesn't ring a bell.  I've heard of Treasure Planet but I haven't seen it.  I also haven't seen Lilo & Stitch.  

With Dinosaur, you aren't missing much. Trust me. Treasure Planet was a good one; I remember watching it a while ago and enjoying it. Lilo and Stitch is also fantastic, in my opinion. 

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16 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Speaking about Dinosaur, it is the only one of the now -official 56 Disney (not including Pixar) animated films that I have not seen. I definitely remember all the trailers on the VHS tapes, but I never bothered with seeing the film.

Back before Michael Eisner started picking public feuds with Pixar, Dinosaur was Disney's first "Pixar-killer" attempt at an in-house CGI studio, formed out of the 90's SFX "Secret Lab" department that gave us all those wacky CGI-FX characters in "George of the Jungle" and "My Favorite Martian".

I remember Disney's first showing the dazzling CGI dialogue-free opening as a teaser trailer before "Toy Story 2", and most of us in the audience thought it was going to be some "art" piece like Pixar's dialogue-free shorts.  And then we saw the ads and learned that the characters....talked.  And not only talked, but that, in the suspiciously Lion King-like story of a hatched dino being raised by lemurs, the character's best lemur pal was his suspiciously Timon-like wisecracking sidekick, audience disillusionment rocketed off the charts.  😱  I'm not even going to say the line that became permanently associated with the movie, but Disney was so happy that we remembered it from the trailer, they stuck it into every single clip ever shown with this movie.  Go ahead, mock our pain.

The reason most of us don't remember it was that it was never "officially" considered one of the Disney Animated Classics, until the early days of Blu-ray thought it could only release CGI animation (why would we want to see high-definition paint brushstrokes?), and apart from Pixar, all Disney had for CGI was Dinosaur, Chicken Little and Meet the Robinsons. So somebody had their membership upgraded quickly.

3 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Lilo and Stitch is also fantastic, in my opinion. 

Lilo is a good character, and Stitch is a good character, but as for the original movie, the opinion of Disney's animators was reportedly that director Chris Sanders couldn't direct you-know-what into a corner without partner Dean DeBlois.  And frankly, it showed--The characters finally gelled in the direct-video "Glitch" sequel and the Disney Channel TV series, but the original movie is all over the map, goes out of its way to get us emotionally involved with the wrong character (if we're concerned about the "token Normie" big sister getting a job and keeping her family together, why do we even CARE about the little psycho and her slobbery hellbeast ruining it for her?), leaves us confused for 3/4 of the movie who the main antagonist even is, and was in desperate need of at least one more script draft.

They didn't get too many before going out, back in the days before Lasseter started cracking the whip in the story department.

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#5: The Reluctant Dragon (1941)

This movie is technically a hybrid, as the majority of it is live action, but towards the very end there is an animated portion. I liked the overall feel of this one. The film is in black and white, and centers around a man whose wife thinks it would be a good idea for him to introduce the children's book "The Reluctant Dragon" to Walt Disney for a movie adaptation.

All in all, I think you could probably refer to this as more of a documentary. The man serves as the audience's guide on the tour of the Walt Disney animation studios. It is a very ingenious idea to have the protagonist so involved in the education and tour of the studios; it keeps it interesting for the audience members. 

My favorite part was the Foley artists and musicians segment. I really enjoyed hearing/watching the orchestra and artists create the sounds for the Casey, Jr. segment. 

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Above: Walt Disney with actor Robert Benchley towards the end of the film. 

I would recommend this to anyone who considers themselves to be a fan of movies. Regardless if you like Disney or not, I think this would be thoroughly enjoyable for anyone to watch. 

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21 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I cannot even remember this movie being in the theater, lining the shelves of the video store, nothing.  I had no idea this even existed until it was mentioned here on the board.  Now I'm sure I'll see copies of it everywhere next time I'm at one of my used DVD haunts.  I'm reading about Dinosaur on Wikipedia.  Apparently it came out in October of 2000.  I would have been a junior in high school at that time.  Maybe it wasn't on my radar then? But I feel like I should have seen a million copies of it at the video store when it came out on video.  I cannot remember it at all. 

Re: Dinosaur. I just asked my brother and he said he definitely remembers watching it. Which must have been significantly later than its release date, considering he was born in 2002. Apparently, we owned this movie and would watch it occasionally. I don't remember anything about it except for the fact that the protagonist was raised by lemurs. 

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speedracer said: "Unless the cheapest one has someone else's personal handwriting all over the cover (for some reason, people feel inclined to write their name on the front of the movie case in Sharpie)

A quick wipe of nail polish remover (weak toluene solution) will remove Sharpie without harming the surface.

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#5: The Reluctant Dragon (Part 2)

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Above: Alan Ladd with Robert Benchley in the start of the "Baby Weems" animation portion. 
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Above: Walt Disney with Robert Benchley towards the end of the film. 

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Above: Robert Benchley with Frances Gifford (right) and unkown woman on the left (if anyone knows who she is, please let me know; I tried to find her, but didn't do a very in-depth search). 

 

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On 5/10/2018 at 8:26 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

#5: The Reluctant Dragon (1941)

All in all, I think you could probably refer to this as more of a documentary. The man serves as the audience's guide on the tour of the Walt Disney animation studios. It is a very ingenious idea to have the protagonist so involved in the education and tour of the studios; it keeps it interesting for the audience members. 

If you look carefully as Robert wanders through the Maquette room (and displays a little unhealthy interest in one of Bacchus's African zebra-taurs from Fantasia), you can see rare figures from a then-planned but abandoned 30's-40's Disney version of "Peter Pan" that ultimately didn't survive wartime production, and the aunt and Siamese cats from "Lady" (no Tramp yet, and only beginning to have that central plot):

reluctant-dragon-disneyscreencaps.com-3129.jpg.68b40eeb6138570aead4f56c699e35c9.jpg

...As you can see from the designs, they were better off waiting.  😓

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NickandNora34: 

Terrific idea. I love anything done chronologically. I'm currently watching movies released in 1957 (having gone through 37-56). I had trouble finding some Disney live-action movies from early 50s. Got fortunate that a local library still had a VHS copy of Song of the South.

Currently watching the 55-56 Disney serial The Adventures of Spin and Marty.

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#6: BAMBI (1942)

Cute tale about a young deer who has to learn about the dynamics of his forest home and the way the world works. Bambi is referred to by several of the other animals as the "Young Prince." I'm going to be honest: this is decidedly not one of my favorite Disney films. The beginning is cute and entertaining, but then after tragedy befalls Bambi's mother, the film proceeds to get a little "meh" (for lack of a better word). I do like the young versions of the animals; their voices are all adorable. 

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Bambi makes friends with a rabbit named Thumper, and a skunk whom he names "Flower." 

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"Little April Shower" is one of my favorite Disney songs of all time. I just love how the tranquil beginning leads to the chaos of the impending storm. 

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Above: Bambi and his mother are playing a game of hide and seek. 

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Donnie Dunagan, the voice of young Bambi.

TRIVIA:

*There are only about 1000 lines of dialogue throughout the film. 

*Thumper and Flower were not in the original work (Felix Salten's novel). Walt wanted to add them as comic relief. 

*Bambi's mother's death was supposed to be seen on screen, but was deemed "too dramatic" for audiences. 

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Well I love BAMBI for all the reasons you stated....his birth, meeting others in the forest and discovering the earth & weather-what a celebration of life! And the Disney artists created such a beautiful picture of the woods, as lyrical as FANTASIA.
Then the stark contrast of the cruelties of life; loneliness, confusion, fear. Horrible for this immature youth to witness & endure. But luckily, others help guide Bambi to adulthood- persevering and balancing the joys of life with the adversity.

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#7: SALUDOS AMIGOS (1942) 

This one is a hybrid; some animation, with the majority being live-action. This is not a traditional animated movie; it is more of an educational movie about Brazil/Argentina, etc. Disney narrators tour the countries and animate some short pieces based on their time there. The narrator discusses various traditions/cultural aspects of these countries, and is accompanied by real life Brazilian and Argentinian people, with the occasional appearances of Donald Duck & Goofy. If you're interested, or want a blast from the past, I would recommend watching this, as it is only 41 minutes long. 

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There was a cute little story about Pedro, a young airplane who goes out to deliver the mail for the first time and gets lost (but ultimately finds his way back home to his parents). 

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Here is Donald with a young boy. I liked the use of Donald throughout this. It was nice to see it through his eyes (so to speak). It made it a little more entertaining. 

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I thought this photo of Goofy was amusing. I dislike him the most out of all the "Fab 5" (as they're called). His voice, laugh, and overall demeanor get old really quickly (in my opinion). 

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Here is Donald with Jose Carioca (who also makes an appearance in The Three Caballeros (1944). I think that one was one of the most obscure films I saw as a young child. 

*TRIVIA*

  • This movie, along with The Three Caballeros (1944), were green lit by Walt in an attempt to restore the relationship between the U.S. and South America during World War II. 
  • This is the shortest Disney movie ever (at 41 minutes). 
  • One of five films to have Goofy as a major character. The others being "A Goofy Movie" and its sequel, "An Extremely Goofy Movie," "The Reluctant Dragon," and "Fun and Fancy Free." 
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2 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

This movie, along with The Three Caballeros (1944), were green lit by Walt in an attempt to restore the relationship between the U.S. and South America during World War II. 

If you watch the "Walt & El Grupo" documentary, it was really more of the government's idea--FDR's "Good Neighbor policy"--as fascist-leaning countries like Uruguay and Argentina were starting to show sympathy toward Germany, and Walt had the cover alibi of a "Fantasia" promotional world-junket anyway.  (And since the artists would be doing government work, they could stall the draft.)  Disney continued producing hired shorts for the Bureau of Inter-American Affairs during the war, mostly public-service shorts for Mexico and Central/South America about sanitation, corn production, and even one malaria-prevention short with a familiar cameo.

Disney wasn't an independent studio yet, with RKO still distributing--RKO had hoped to get Orson Welles to make a similar South America-appeasing film, but "It's All True" was famously never finished.

2 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

I thought this photo of Goofy was amusing. I dislike him the most out of all the "Fab 5" (as they're called). His voice, laugh, and overall demeanor get old really quickly (in my opinion).  

IMO, Goofy was always a favorite, since he's the opposite to Donald's frustrated temper--No matter what messes Goofy ends up in, he's always optimistic and never fazed.  Notice how, in the Goofy How-To shorts, he always tips his friendly hat after demonstrating how not to do it, and the narrator (ahem) moves on.  :)

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#8: VICTORY THROUGH AIR POWER (1943) 

Another informational/educational film from the Walt Disney Company. This was based off of the book of the same name (1942) by Alexander P. de Seversky. Seversky also appeared in the film, which I thought was nice.  I was lucky to find this one on YouTube, so if anyone wants to watch it, it's free on there. History has always been one of my favorite school subjects, so this was quite fascinating to me, although it definitely wasn't my favorite thing to watch. Essentially, this is an incomplete history of aviation (naturally it's incomplete, because it was made in the early 40s, and we've made such strides in the world of aircraft). 

I appreciated the use of animation with this. I think Disney did a fantastic job with incorporating animation into their educational films. I think it helps keep the audience members' attention (regardless of their ages). This film heavily focuses on WW2 and the aviary soldiers. I don't have too much to say about this one. I think it basically speaks for itself. 

The version I watched was in black and white, although I realize the original format was in Technicolor. 

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Wanted to post this earlier but couldn't remember the title.  Mickey and Minnie Mouse dead ringers (lookalikes) that got Van Beuren in hot water with Disney.

 

 

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#9: THE THREE CABALLEROS (1944)

It has been approximately 15 years since I have actually seen this. I used to watch it at my grandma's house on VHS whenever I would visit her, so I have fond memories of this movie. It is another hybrid educational film from Disney, about South America. Jose Carioca from "Saludos Amigos" makes another appearance.

The film starts out with a short about a penguin who wants to move to a warmer climate. Disney favorite Sterling Holloway narrates this, and he has such a distinguishable voice I recognized him right off. 

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By far, my favorite segment was the flying donkey one. The animation was really cute. 

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"The Three Caballeros" in question: Donald Duck, Panchito, & Jose Carioca. 

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Nothing too spectacular. I enjoyed the music; it was very catchy and reminiscent of the time period/culture. I could do without all these semi-educational films, though. I've watched 4 at this point... 

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By the way, if I had a nickel every time Donald Duck flirted with a human female, I could retire at age 22 (I jest of course, and exaggerate, but it's simultaneously humorous and annoying). 

*TRIVIA* 

  • Last animated film that was released during WW2 (released in 1944). 
  • During one of the live action sequences ("Baia," to be exact) Donald Duck falls for a young woman who just so happens to be Aurora Miranda (Carmen Miranda's younger sister). 
  • This film's score was nominated for Best Musical Score, but ultimately lost to Anchors Aweigh (1945). 
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I love The Three Cabelleros! For the longest time, I kept hearing that Desi Arnaz was in this film but after multiple viewings, I still haven't found him.  

I hope when you get to the 1950s that you're going to watch Donald Duck in MathMagic Land.  I love this cartoon and I hate math with a passion. 

I am still on Fantasia.  I only watched half.  I am dreading finishing it.  I may have to throw in the towel and move on! 

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23 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I love The Three Cabelleros! For the longest time, I kept hearing that Desi Arnaz was in this film but after multiple viewings, I still haven't found him.  

I hope when you get to the 1950s that you're going to watch Donald Duck in MathMagic Land.  I love this cartoon and I hate math with a passion. 

I am still on Fantasia.  I only watched half.  I am dreading finishing it.  I may have to throw in the towel and move on! 

To be fair, Fantasia almost made me give up. 

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1 hour ago, NickAndNora34 said:

To be fair, Fantasia almost made me give up. 

If you can make it past those never-ending dinosaurs, it's all clear sailing...  :)

Me, I can take or leave Night on Bald Mountain, but will always rush to the defense of Ave Maria:

6159478004_33e81b4847.jpg

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#10: MAKE MINE MUSIC (1946)

This film consists of animated segments set to a more contemporary mode of music. 3 notable performers/groups that are featured in this are Nelson Eddy (where's Jeanette), Dinah Shore, and The Andrews Sisters. There are a wide range of segments in this from bobby-soxers to operatically inclined whales to a love story between hats (yes, you read that right) to ballet and big band.

Perhaps one of my favorite segments was the love story between the women's hat and the men's hat, entitled "Johnnie Fedora and Alice Bluebonnet."

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The Andrews Sisters accompanied this one through song, and it was all very well done. The hats are placed next to each other in a millinery shop, and are blissfully involved until a lady comes in to buy Alice Bluebonnet. The remainder of the piece deals with Johnnie Fedora trying to find and be reunited with his girlfriend. A weird concept, to be fair, but an endearing one nonetheless. 

Nelson Eddy's portion was very familiar to me, and I'm racking my brains trying to remember where and when I've seen it. Eddy voiced all the characters in his segment about a whale who was discovered to have a powerful opera voice. Willie the Whale was thus invited to sing at music halls all over the country, but ultimately met his demise.

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Overall, this was a whole lot more interesting than Fantasia (1940). Of course, there is a notable difference between the two: the former deals with contemporary music, while the latter deals with classical music. I would have to say (emphatically, I might add) that I am not typically a fan of the music of Mozart and his peers. The animation was very cute in this, and I enjoyed the music.

One thing I noticed and wondered: one of the segments is about a baseball player named Casey (in the 1910's) and I was curious as to whether or not this particular section was the inspiration for the quick-service restaurant "Casey's Corner" at Walt Disney World in FL (which is, coincidentally, also 1910's baseball themed). I must admit I picked up a shift there only because I wanted to wear the costume. 

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Yes, Peter and the Wolf is featured in this as well. I didn't have the energy to write anything about it. It's been done already. 

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Well I got a copy of THE RELUCTANT DRAGON from the li-berry just to see fave Bob Benchley. Wah! The copy I got was a compilation of cloying Disney shorts, including TRD, Ferdinand The Bull, Goliath 2 and Johnny Appleseed.
Beautiful animation. I can see that Hanna Barbara took the personality of Disney's dragon for the original Dino in the Flintstones, then dropped it for a non verbal Dino. I believe that "personality" was originally Phil Silvers' charactor creation.

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6 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Well I got a copy of THE RELUCTANT DRAGON from the li-berry just to see fave Bob Benchley. Wah! The copy I got was a compilation of cloying Disney shorts, including TRD, Ferdinand The Bull, Goliath 2 and Johnny Appleseed.

Pointed it out earlier in the thread, but if you're looking for Bob and the studio (and the live duet between Donald Duck and Clara Cluck), the entire feature is an extra on Disney's Adv. of Ichabod & Mr. Toad/Fun & Fancy Free 2-movie Blu-ray, or, if you're just renting, it's VOD streaming-DL on Vudu and Amazon:

https://www.vudu.com/content/movies/details/The-Reluctant-Dragon/92898

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