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MissGoddess

Ryan's Daughter

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BobinRyansDaughter2.jpg

 

Before I sit down and for third and perhaps last time make an attempt to watch this film in its entirely, I thought I would throw up a thread to discuss it in caser there are any admirers out there. I want to know what others who like it think are its strong points because I've just never been able to lose myself in it as I do several other David Lean stories. I suspect it's my disappointment in Mitchum's character. Which seems to be the whole point---that he is, in fact, a disappointment to himself. However, this time I will make myself watch it to the bitter end, hoping it won't be so bitter and I can enjoy it.

 

I am particularly curious, MoiraFinnie, what your opinion of the movie may be?

 

BobinRyansDaughter.jpg

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Ryan's Daughter (1970) is an interesting film. I liked Performances from Trevor Howard and John Mills. I thought the cinematography is brilliant. Its been a long since I saw this film. I think Rosy's problem is her inability to sense or take happiness.

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I guess the third time is the charm because I managed to watch the entire thing and I did like it. I thought Freddie Young's picture work was amazing---he managed not just to capture beauty but the emotional subtext of each visual. Extraordinary. If he didn't win an Oscar for that movie it would be a shame.

 

I pity Rosy's character and feel empathetic. What a ghastly life for a young girl, any young girl but one of her spirit and imagination---to live in that squot of a village? I'd have probably done the same things she did, or run away.

 

Mitchum was remarkably convincing. I think there is to a certain degree an underlying passivity in his own personality that served the character very well.

 

I wish there had been more heightened sense of drama and urgency in the movie, more emotional punch. It may be that it's simply too long and it drags scenes down which otherwise might have greater urgency to them, especially from Rosy's point of view. But then, the movie is not really told from her point of view---or anyone's.

 

John Mills was terrific.

 

David Lean's "eye" and quiet command of the language of cinema reminds me of John Ford's.

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Hello there MissG. I know I'm no MoiraFinnie, but IMHO, I enjoyed "RYAN'S DAUGHTER" when it came out back in 1970. Saw it at the Ziegfeld (a big-screen movie palace). I remember being blown away by the cinematography and the big-ness of the film. I thought Mitchum was kind of wimpy. But almost forty years later, knowing more of Mitchum's oeuvre of films than I did as an 18 year old, I see he did very well toning down his masculine image. (Have the movie soundtrack LP too).

 

Glad you enjoyed the film this third time around.

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Hi CM,

 

I watched the documentaries about the making of Ryan's Daughter which are included in the dvd. They truly added to my appreciation of the film and all the people who worked on it. I've always been an enormous admirer of Lean. The only bonus I didn't listen to was the audio commentary which included many people involved in the film and---Richard SchNickel. I just can't bring myself to listen to him in anything. And since he led the NYC brigade that bashed the film I think I can dispense with his comments, tempered though they may be at this late date.

 

I don't think Ryan's Daughter has the emotional power of some of his other films, but it's a remarkable looking movie with performances by Trevor Howard (one of my favorite of his---and his character is by far the most interesting to me in the entire film) and John Mills. Mitchum gave a fine performance but I still find his character too passive and weak---I wish just once he's gone into some kind of rage, but his character was not capable of that. I admire how he adores Rosy so much he forgives her anything. She's ruddy blessed to have him for a husband. He's a pure soul.

 

I never knew Flaubert's Madame Bovary was the inspiration for this movie. It makes sense.

 

I am not enraptured with Sarah Miles. She played the part well, I just would have preferred someone else---Julie Christie (of course!). :)

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Hi MissG.: "I am not enraptured with Sarah Miles. She played the part well, I just would have preferred someone else---Julie Christie (of course!)."

 

You should be a casting agent. Didn't the young man who played the soldier remind you of James Dean? I think he was married to Sybil Burton, Richard Burton's ex.

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You should be a casting agent. Didn't the young man who played the soldier remind you of James Dean? I think he was married to Sybil Burton, Richard Burton's ex.

 

Hi CM! Yes! The moment I first saw him on screen I immediately thought "James Dean". But his character was puzzling...I don't think he had more than five or ten lines of dialogue and though I appreciate Lean's economy with words I do wish I could have gotten into the character more. He just never seemed more than a shadow to me, or a symbol---the "tragic lover".

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Anyone else appreciate Leo McKern's performance in this film?. I enjoy him in just anything he does...but thought he did esp. good here.

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The film would have probably been more effective if Lean had shot it in a more intimate scale and not like an epic. He had a terrible time directing Christopher Jones- who refused to do the films big love scene and had to be drugged in order to get him to perform. Jones ended up as one of those paranoid Hollywood nut cases.

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Ms.G., I think you hit it on the head and I agree. Christopher Jones (from "Wild in the Streets") was just a representative of an idea: "The Tragic Lover."

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> {quote:title=DTsWereMe wrote:}{quote}

> Anyone else appreciate Leo McKern's performance in this film?. I enjoy him in just anything he does...but thought he did esp. good here.

 

I thought he was brilliant!

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> {quote:title=joefilmone wrote:}{quote}

> The film would have probably been more effective if Lean had shot it in a more intimate scale and not like an epic. He had a terrible time directing Christopher Jones- who refused to do the films big love scene and had to be drugged in order to get him to perform. Jones ended up as one of those paranoid Hollywood nut cases.

 

The movie does have an overwhelming sense, especially in the storm sequence, though it was spectacular.

 

I don't why I'm not surprised by what you say of Christopher Jones later years. He had an odd look about him, a troubled look.

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> Ms.G., I think you hit it on the head and I agree. Christopher Jones (from "Wild in the Streets") was just a representative of an idea: "The Tragic Lover."

 

Hi CM---I wish his character could have had more dimension, but perhaps that was never the intention of Lean (or Bolt, the screenwriter). They may have wanted to keep Mitchum's "Charles Shaunnessey" more in the foreground (and almost any guy would seem exciting next to him, lol. That's why Mitchum is such a good actor---he represses so much of his own exciting charisma and just reveals the passiveness).

 

You guys should see the brief clips of Mitchum being interviewed on the set---I should say, the journalist is attempting to interview him. It's hilarious. This is why I LOVE that man.

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Holy mackeral. I never heard that story. Was Sarah Miles THAT much of a turnoff? Maybe Julie Christie would have had to be drugged if she had to do a scene with Jones.

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There was an interview with the demented Mr Jones in either Premiere or some other movie magazine about in which he said he was kept prisoner by some gay agents in a Hollywood mansion. He did not make a major movie after " Ryan's Daughter" and even when Tarantino offered him a part in " Pulp Fiction" he turned it down.

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He was upset about Sharon Tate's death, according to this:

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/femail/article.html?in_article_id=478867&in_page_id=1879

 

I have no idea how much of this can be believed, but it's an interesting - if sad - little read. At least he had a sensible girlfriend to advise him on Tarantino's offer.

 

Message was edited by: LuckyDan

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