Sign in to follow this  
LiamCasey

"Vengeance of the Zombies" (aka "La rebelión de las muertas") (1973)

3 posts in this topic

Vengeance of the Zombies (aka La rebelión de las muertas) (1973)

w/ Paul Naschy, Romy, Vic Winner, Mirta Miller and María Kosty. Directed by León Klimovsky. And written by Paul Naschy.

In contemporary 1970s England we get two converging plot lines; one involving a Hindu mystic named Krisna and one involving a voodoo master named Kantaka who knocks off women and then brings them back as zombies who are the tools of his vengeance. And both roles are portrayed by Paul Naschy. Who also portrays a very horned Satan. And with each plot line initially united by one whom appears to be the heroine of our tale (Romy) but who really doesn't do anything.

And, again, an ending where the villain gets his comeuppance a bit too easily. And then the comeuppance gets its own comeuppance just as easily. And then the obligatory police decide that their work here is done and depart leaving at least 9 corpses behind. It was like someone decided it was time to end the movie no matter what.

Basically a series of interesting set pieces poorly tied together. Still watchable but, needless to say, a couple of steps down from the previously watched Horror Rises from the Tomb (1973).

Random comments:

1) This is the second of five movies in The Paul Naschy Collection Blu-Ray set.

2) Being a zombie movie that was released in 1973 it would be easy to jump to the conclusion that this movie was inspired by the earlier Night of the Living Dead (1968). But Live and Let Die (1973) was released that same year. How much of the voodoo aspects of that James Bond movie were known ahead of time? And could any of those aspects have influenced the makers of Vengeance of the Zombies (including setting the movie in James Bond's home country)? It wouldn't be the first time that the makers of a low-budget movie attempted to ride the tenuous coattails of a much bigger-budgeted one.

3) And the zombies in this one were definitely not inspired by George A Romero. Instead we had sexy women lightly tinted blue and lightly dressed in diaphanous gowns. What else would one expect from a 1970s European horror movie?

4) Of course the use of an English setting could have been inspired by Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972).

5) Speaking of 1970s European horror movies, there is less nudity in this one than there was in Horror Rises from the Tomb. But it was still gratuitous. And it does make one wonder why, in the case of the first two movies in this set, Paul Naschy the writer needed to provide Paul Naschy the actor with opportunities to physically caress his totally or partially nude female costars. Was the nudity there simply to increase the paid attendance by the stereotypically male audience of horror movies? Or was there some self-image gratification going on here?

6) My wife is far from being a fan of horror movies so we're usually in separate areas of the house when I watch one. But out of sight is not necessarily out of hearing. And, at one point, she stuck her head in to see what the heck I was watching because it sounded to her like a stereotypical 1970s porn soundtrack. Which, sad to say, was an apt description. It was not a soundtrack for a horror movie.

7) Krisna, the Hindu guru, lived in Llangwell. That name has to have been inspired by Larry Talbot's Welsh home village of Llanwelly.

8) This movie including a scene where the head of a live chicken was cut off. Personally I found that absolutely disgraceful. Now, I am not a vegetarian. But killing for the sake of food is one thing. Killing for the sake of art (and I use the term very loosely here) is something else entirely.

9) In addition to Paul Naschy, actors common to both Horror Rises from the Dead and Vengeance of the Zombies were Luis Ciges, Montserrat Julió, Vic Winner and Elsa Zabala. Now two movies does not a pattern make, but I've watched and rewatched so many Universal and Hammer horror movies that it just makes sense to start paying attention to who keeps appearing and reappearing in these ones right off the bat. Is there a Spanish equivalent of Michael Ripper?

10) And then there is Mirta Miller. She appeared in two other horror movies with Paul Naschy. And, sadly, the three remaining movies on this collection do not include those. She is a doll.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, LiamCasey said:

Vengeance of the Zombies (aka La rebelión de las muertas) (1973)

w/ Paul Naschy, Romy, Vic Winner, Mirta Miller and María Kosty. Directed by León Klimovsky. And written by Paul Naschy.

In contemporary 1970s England we get two converging plot lines; one involving a Hindu mystic named Krisna and one involving a voodoo master named Kantaka who knocks off women and then brings them back as zombies who are the tools of his vengeance. And both roles are portrayed by Paul Naschy. Who also portrays a very horned Satan. And with each plot line initially united by one whom appears to be the heroine of our tale (Romy) but who really doesn't do anything.

And, again, an ending where the villain gets his comeuppance a bit too easily. And then the comeuppance gets its own comeuppance just as easily. And then the obligatory police decide that their work here is done and depart leaving at least 9 corpses behind. It was like someone decided it was time to end the movie no matter what.

Basically a series of interesting set pieces poorly tied together. Still watchable but, needless to say, a couple of steps down from the previously watched Horror Rises from the Tomb (1973).

Random comments:

1) This is the second of five movies in The Paul Naschy Collection Blu-Ray set.

2) Being a zombie movie that was released in 1973 it would be easy to jump to the conclusion that this movie was inspired by the earlier Night of the Living Dead (1968). But Live and Let Die (1973) was released that same year. How much of the voodoo aspects of that James Bond movie were known ahead of time? And could any of those aspects have influenced the makers of Vengeance of the Zombies (including setting the movie in James Bond's home country)? It wouldn't be the first time that the makers of a low-budget movie attempted to ride the tenuous coattails of a much bigger-budgeted one.

3) And the zombies in this one were definitely not inspired by George A Romero. Instead we had sexy women lightly tinted blue and lightly dressed in diaphanous gowns. What else would one expect from a 1970s European horror movie?

4) Of course the use of an English setting could have been inspired by Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972).

5) Speaking of 1970s European horror movies, there is less nudity in this one than there was in Horror Rises from the Tomb. But it was still gratuitous. And it does make one wonder why, in the case of the first two movies in this set, Paul Naschy the writer needed to provide Paul Naschy the actor with opportunities to physically caress his totally or partially nude female costars. Was the nudity there simply to increase the paid attendance by the stereotypically male audience of horror movies? Or was there some self-image gratification going on here?

6) My wife is far from being a fan of horror movies so we're usually in separate areas of the house when I watch one. But out of sight is not necessarily out of hearing. And, at one point, she stuck her head in to see what the heck I was watching because it sounded to her like a stereotypical 1970s porn soundtrack. Which, sad to say, was an apt description. It was not a soundtrack for a horror movie.

7) Krisna, the Hindu guru, lived in Llangwell. That name has to have been inspired by Larry Talbot's Welsh home village of Llanwelly.

😎 This movie including a scene where the head of a live chicken was cut off. Personally I found that absolutely disgraceful. Now, I am not a vegetarian. But killing for the sake of food is one thing. Killing for the sake of art (and I use the term very loosely here) is something else entirely.

9) In addition to Paul Naschy, actors common to both Horror Rises from the Dead and Vengeance of the Zombies were Luis Ciges, Montserrat Julió, Vic Winner and Elsa Zabala. Now two movies does not a pattern make, but I've watched and rewatched so many Universal and Hammer horror movies that it just makes sense to start paying attention to who keeps appearing and reappearing in these ones right off the bat. Is there a Spanish equivalent of Michael Ripper?

10) And then there is Mirta Miller. She appeared in two other horror movies with Paul Naschy. And, sadly, the three remaining movies on this collection do not include those. She is a doll.

You really make me want to watch these movies

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, LiamCasey said:

Was the nudity there simply to increase the paid attendance by the stereotypically male audience of horror movies?

Those low budget European horror movies from the 70s were always fun to watch, and if they showed nudity, they were a must!

My friends and I would spend an afternoon watching giallo (Barbara Bouchet!), and horror movies that nobody took seriously. Some of those movies had some good, suspenseful scenes, but the nudity was the big draw.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us