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Barton_Keyes

Oscar-winning editor Anne V. Coates has died

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British-born Anne V. Coates, a prolific film editor who won an Oscar for cutting David Lean's 1962 epic Lawrence of Arabia, died on May 8, 2018 at the Motion Picture Country Home and Hospital in Woodland Hills, California. She was 92. 

Coates also received Oscar-nominations for editing Becket (1964), David Lynch's The Elephant Man (1980), Wolfgang Petersen's In the Line of Fire (1993) and Steven Soderbergh's Out of Sight (1998). She received an honorary Oscar at the Academy Governor's Awards in 2016. 

Coates' uncle was British film producer J. Arthur Rank and her husband was film director Douglas Hickox, who directed such films as Brannigan (1975) with John Wayne and Zulu Dawn (1979) with Burt Lancaster and Peter O'Toole.

Coates' other credits include John Ford's Young Cassidy (1965), Sidney Lumet's Murder on the Orient Express (1974), Richard Attenborough's Chaplin (1992), Soderbergh's Erin Brockovich (2000) and, most recently, Fifty Shades of Grey (2015).

Anne V. Coates is remembered by The Hollywood Reporter here: https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/anne-v-coates-dead-lawrence-of-arabia-film-editor-was-92-908441

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Her famous cut from British Army HQ in Cairo to the desert in "Lawrence of Arabia" is one of my favorite movie moments. And the film has many other memorable scenes!

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Oddly enough I was at the MPTF yesterday. I was standing outside when a priest passed me heading indoors. He seemed like he was deep in thought.  At that moment I suspected he might be getting ready to offer someone last rites!

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9 hours ago, jakeem said:

Her famous cut from British Army HQ in Cairo to the desert in "Lawrence of Arabia" is one of my favorite movie moments. And the film has many other memorable scenes!

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I would say the greatest edit in movie history and it came about because of old technology.  It was designed to be a dissolve which today would be achieved right in the cutting room with the use of digital editing technology.  As Lawrence was cut on celluloid film using a moviola only a straight cut was available during editing, the dissolve being drawn on the film print with a china marker to be performed by the laboratory at a later date.  They obviously grew to love the straight cut and ditched the idea of the dissolve.

This cut suggests so many of the film's themes.  Lawrence who up to this point had amused himself with parlour tricks such as putting out the match with his fingers now blows away these childish things and is propelled into the desert and larger stage to meet his destiny.  It is also another reference to Lawrence's predilection for testing himself with pain.  The scorching desert is his ultimate test.

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Barton, thank you for drawing this to our attention. Though I have not seen Out of Sight, Anne V. Coates considered it the best example in her work of the modern style of cutting.

Her Oscar for Lawrence of Arabia has to be one of the most deserving Oscar wins ever.

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Her work in Murder on the Orient Express (1974) was terrific. She and Geoffrey Unsworth worked together show the interrogation scenes with different lights and camera angles to produce a different point of view of the scene and give the suspect's words a new meaning.

Thank you, Ms. Coates.

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I actually saw this woman not too long ago in a documentary called Side by Side at my film class. She talked briefly  about the famous cut in Lawrence of Arabia. Very sad.

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