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papyrusbeetle

Stanley Kubrick - are his films really "British"? And why all the DEATH?

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watching the "extras" for DR. STRANGELOVE, it seems that Kubrick is totally supported and styled by British crew and experts. Shouldn't we see his work as a 

"hybrid"?

And why the MASSIVE fascination and hilarious treatment of DEATH?

Artistry, or just weirdness?

 

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What else is there but sex and death in the human condition?

Anyway, 'Strangelove' was a reply from Terry Southern to Lumet's mega-disturbing "Fail-Safe" ...so, its easy to see why the same theme exists in both.

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On May 9, 2018 at 10:12 AM, papyrusbeetle said:

watching the "extras" for DR. STRANGELOVE, it seems that Kubrick is totally supported and styled by British crew and experts. Shouldn't we see his work as a 

"hybrid"?

And why the MASSIVE fascination and hilarious treatment of DEATH?

Artistry, or just weirdness?

 

I think more than most directors, you could see his movies as "Kubrick."

And for the hilarious fascination, it's called black comedy.  You could also call it bleak satire.  Don't worry too much about it, a lot of it was a product of the times it was made in.

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As far as I'm aware he lived in England so it would have made sense to just use an English crew.

Although, Kubrick isn't know for "just doing stuff", he famously thought things through to the extreme.

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Another angle is residuals. In America, unions negotiate residuals for cast and crew; which is yet another cut off the back end. For an example of how much this can figure in overall, look at George Lucas. Once he really got rolling with his franchise, he began filming overseas precisely to avoid paying any residuals out.

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Stanley Kubrick went to my high school (a few decades before). One of my teachers said he was a bad student, and so "there's hope for you all!"

 

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Aye. Apparently too, he was a young photographer at the 1939 World's Fair.

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On 3/10/2019 at 11:23 AM, powerofnow said:

As far as I'm aware he lived in England so it would have made sense to just use an English crew.

Although, Kubrick isn't know for "just doing stuff", he famously thought things through to the extreme.

No doubt you have read ET .

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Kubrick was a true New Yorker down to the accent; even after years of living in the UK Eyes Wide Shut being filmed in England looks and feels like NY City. He was interested in the human condition like Jung and Freud, Bergman and Bunuel; He also had a cynical and sometimes sick sense of humor - you either get it or you don't.

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