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POLL: your favs. VS. actual best? PART #1

36 posts in this topic

40 minutes ago, CaveGirl said:

Okay, so "greatest guitar player' might be Django Reinhardt or Jimi Hendrix? 

Remember, Django was operating under that disability of having fused fingers from the fire...

Wes Montgomery 'wins' the greatest guitar player poll every time there is an informal poll at the jazz-guitar forum.   He gets my vote as well. 

Love Django and yes,  amazing what he did with those fused fingers (which lead to him doing 'bends' and 'pull offs' and other techniques to overcome his disability). 

As for Hendrix;  not much of a fan.    Quincy Jones tried to get him to play on some jazz albums and he ended up not showing up because he couldn't handle play over the changes due to his limited abilities outside fairly simple blues based harmonies.     (yea, I'm a musical snob!).

 

 

 

  

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5 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Wes Montgomery 'wins' the greatest guitar player poll every time there is an informal poll at the jazz-guitar forum.   He gets my vote as well. 

Love Django and yes,  amazing what he did with those fused fingers (which lead to him doing 'bends' and 'pull offs' and other techniques to overcome his disability). 

As for Hendrix;  not much of a fan.    Quincy Jones tried to get him to play on some jazz albums and he ended up not showing up because he couldn't handle play over the changes due to his limited abilities outside fairly simple blues based harmonies.     (yea, I'm a musical snob!).

 

 

 

  

In the 90s, when I used to go to Paris a lot, they were always playing the records of jazz violinist Stéphane Grappelli.

He was elderly then, but it didn't slow down his playing. Once you got used to it, you couldn't get it out of your mind.

Hearing him on French radio interview shows, he had quite a youthful personality. He talked about his start and that he was with Django in the beginning many years ago.

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33 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

In the 90s, when I used to go to Paris a lot, they were always playing the records of jazz violinist Stéphane Grappelli.

He was elderly then, but it didn't slow down his playing. Once you got used to it, you couldn't get it out of your mind.

Hearing him on French radio interview shows, he had quite a youthful personality. He talked about his start and that he was with Django in the beginning many years ago.

I saw Grappelli twice here in So Cal.   He was in his mid 80s but he could still play.    He was so gracious to the much younger musicians in the band.   First class man from what I read from those that knew him and played music with him.  

Those Django \ Grappelli recordings were ahead of their time.  

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13 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Wes Montgomery 'wins' the greatest guitar player poll every time there is an informal poll at the jazz-guitar forum.   He gets my vote as well. 

Love Django and yes,  amazing what he did with those fused fingers (which lead to him doing 'bends' and 'pull offs' and other techniques to overcome his disability). 

As for Hendrix;  not much of a fan.    Quincy Jones tried to get him to play on some jazz albums and he ended up not showing up because he couldn't handle play over the changes due to his limited abilities outside fairly simple blues based harmonies.     (yea, I'm a musical snob!).

 

 

 

  

Ever check out *Woody's fun one with *Penn "Sweet & Lowdown?" ($6m.) (***)

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On 5/15/2018 at 2:58 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

Spence;  What are some of the specific criteria you use for 'greatest' as it relates to acting?     Now one's favorite is easy to define and 100% subjective,  but for greatest one needs some criteria.    E.g. ability to do comedy?   Play a historical character?  etc....

I never judge 'greatest' when it comes to acting since I'm NOT an actor,   I lack knowledge of related to the art of acting, and I feel that any criteria is too subjective. 

When the topic is Jazz Guitar,  I'll 'play ball' because I have played jazz guitar for decades and there is some objective skill criteria one can use, like use of complex chord voicing,  double-stops,  etc... to determine the cream of the crop. 

 

Yeah, I usually shy away from "greatest" and/or "best" lists and polls due to that "subjective" factor.  

Now, James, you mention jazz guitar.  And that too gets into the "subjective" thing,  ie:  I have a buddy who thinks GRANT GREEN was the "best" jazz guitarist ever, and yet another buddy who had NO use for Green. (And personally, I wasn't that impressed either).  So, it just endorses (and enforces) the idea that in these kind of forum threads, what(or whom) somebody claims as the "best" usually turns out to be the one(s) they LIKE the best.

And besides...

Most of MY favorite actors are CHARACTER actors, and THAT would comprise of a list too lengthy for me to take the time to post.  So we'd have to break this down into more specifics.  ;)

As for those who were(and/or still are) "stars", my list would be more or less along the lines of TOPBILLED'S except I'D probably swap out Sinatra for HUMPHREY BOGART.  ;)

BTW---been enjoying the HELL out of watching those old MAVERICK reruns on H&I and MeTV.  The show WAS where, as a young boy, I developed a "fan" vibe for JAMES GARNER that has lasted lo, these last 60+ years.  The show made it's debut on my wife's 16th birthday, and she said the TV was on just as she was blowing out her candles and looked up to see Garner's smiling face on their little MOTOROLA'S screen and too, "fell in love"!  :D

So, we both share in TB's opinion of Jim.  Hero, villain, comedy, drama, nothing seemed out of his range.

Sepiatone

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URGENT TO TOP, did I also already post AFI's100years...0 Stars" (l999 poll & CBS-tv special but  on the actors yet?

 

PLEASE LOOK INTO IT

 

THE LADIES GOT O RESPONSES?

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On 5/14/2018 at 11:43 PM, spence said:

WELL, that's a drag on this oe, appears not 1 wanted to throw their views in for some reason???

 

WHAT DO YOU MEAN?

I have written something like this before to you directly Spence and it bears repeating once again.

I am probably going to be lambasted for what I am writing here but I really do think this needs to be written to you and others like you who needs some advice...

This post is not meant to be harsh, or unfriendly, but rather to offer some friendly advice when posting on the message boards.

As TopBilled has written in this thread, sometimes when one posts too many threads, it becomes tedious to read each and every thread. Thus, one may not get the response or responses one desires.

Recently you have posted quite a few different threads about a myriad of topics in General Discussions. As LawrenceA has commented, many of these types of threads asking about favorite actors, film composers, AFI lists, etc.,  would be better served if you used the Your Favorites Forum.

You would be surprised just how many members post on that forum.

Now I am no where near perfect when it comes to writing. In fact I am fairly terrible when trying to compose letters and or my thoughts and it takes several drafts before I think that what I have written makes sense not only to me, but to others who will be reading what I am writing.

In my opinion, you need to write several drafts of what you want to say before actually posting it. In many of your posts you write so disjointed that it is very hard to read what you are trying to say. Your use of multiple asterisks, the listing of of birth and death years after the actor's names and use of multiple punctuation type marks makes it hard to read as well. Plus you constantly misspell words and that is hard to follow at times.

When you create titles for your threads, they too often are either misspelled or disjointed and it is hard to understand what exactly you are asking for or are trying to convey to the members here.

I am sorry if I am posting this here, but you want more replies? Then I would use a text edit or word document first before you post and then spellcheck what you want to post before actually posting it. That would definitely help when reading your posts. I usually do this and it helps quite a bit. Sometimes I still miss spelling certain words and what I write is not always grammatically correct, but I try. You should as well.

It is not as if this is a race to see how fast you can post a thread, it is more important that you take your time when trying to write a post within a thread, or creating a thread in the first place.

Please don't despair. You are very talented and you offer many fine attributes to the message boards. You bring awareness to certain topics many here have never ever thought of.

Spence, this is friendly advice to you and I hope you consider my ideas here.

 

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I don't know how I would differentiate my favorites from "the actual best."  If a performer is my favorite, then in my eyes, they are "the best."  Many of the so-called greatest actors I find are really dull and don't do anything for me.

For example, Laurence Olivier is often regarded as one of the greatest actors, but I find him dull.  I did like him in Rebecca.  

I am also not a big fan of Richard Burton, though I have enjoyed watching films that he's in.  I didn't seek the film out because he was in it.  For example, in Night of the Iguana, I think Ava Gardner provided the best performance in the film.

I like Marlon Brando in his 1950s output, but beyond that, I am not a big fan. 

As I discover new actors and films, my list of favorites is ever-evolving.  I don't know if I can say I truly dislike any actor and their appearance in a film would dissuade me from seeing it, but if said actor was the sole draw to the film I may be less likely to want to watch it.  With that said, a film may come around one time and it doesn't interest me. However, by the time it comes around again, I may have discovered an actor or a new type of genre I love, or what not, and decide to watch the film the second go around.

My current list of favorites, those whom I actively seek out new films and constantly re-watch favorites:

ACTORS

1. Errol Flynn

2. Cary Grant

3. Humphrey Bogart

4. Fred Astaire

5. William Holden

6. Jack Lemmon

7. James Stewart

8. Burt Lancaster

9. William Powell

10. Robert Mitchum

 

ACTRESSES

1. Lucille Ball

2. Bette Davis

3. Audrey Hepburn

4. Katharine Hepburn

5. Ginger Rogers

6. Barbara Stanwyck

7. Jean Arthur

8. Sandra Dee

9. Eleanor Parker

10. Eve Arden

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I like Dick Powell and appreciate how his talent evolved from juvenile crooner to hard-boiled noir lead.  But I recall from a June Allyson bit on TCM that, paraphrasing, Dick called all the shots at home (Was he being a director in more ways than one?  Just speculating.).  Maybe it was bossy Dick that led to June's interest in Alan Ladd.  It's interesting that both these men hit their creative stride in noir.    

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16 minutes ago, ChristineHoard said:

I like Dick Powell and appreciate how his talent evolved from juvenile crooner to hard-boiled noir lead.  But I recall from a June Allyson bit on TCM that, paraphrasing, Dick called all the shots at home (Was he being a director in more ways than one?  Just speculating.).  Maybe it was bossy Dick that led to June's interest in Alan Ladd.  It's interesting that both these men hit their creative stride in noir.    

 The first time I ever heard about Dick Powell and June Allyson they were on television creating all kinds of TV series.

I remember being so impressed with Dick Powell and his versatility in classic TV. It never occurred to me  about what kind of career he had previously, although I knew he had been a Movie Star.

 The same was true of Loretta Young and Barbara Stanwyck--two great stars who came to classic TV.

Even though I knew nothing really about their past, I was aware that they must have been big stars because of the publicity buildup they got in the fan magazines, Life and TV Guide.

In middle age they were all still such attractive people!

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