Sign in to follow this  
FilmSnob

Help! Can no longer include images in posts

8 posts in this topic

I've been inserting images into my posts for reviews and artwork, but the last time I did this I was told the file size had to be smaller than 400-something KB. I resized the images to get under the limit, but now I tried to post again and was told the limit was trivially small this time, leaving me unable to include images in my posts.

Help?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you uploading images to your posts directly from your computer? If so, there is a limit as to how much you can upload (I don't recall what it is). So you would need to use a photo-upload site, like imgur.com, for instance. There, you can upload images (for free) and paste them into your posts here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

any reason I can no longer view images posted w/links from Jakeem or Jake??

:blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, mr6666 said:

any reason I can no longer view images posted w/links from Jakeem or Jake??

:blink:

They usually post tweets so it might have something to do with that.

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, mr6666 said:

any reason I can no longer view images posted w/links from Jakeem or Jake??

:blink:

Yeah, I'm not sure. What browser are you using? Have there been any updates to either that or your security? Can you see the text in their posts, or is that invisible, too?

Most of what JakeHolman posts are embedded tweets from Twitter. They load differently, and take much longer to load on my system (Windows 10/Chrome browser). Jakeem on the other hand seems to be copy/pasting from tweets instead of directly posting as a tweet. They load like anyone else's posts and they don't take any time to do so (unlike Holman's). So I'm not sure why his pics should be blocked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tried 'refreshing' FF....& it seems OK now :)

 

though it was kinda nice w/o them,

but seems I can post images (for now)

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, mr6666 said:

tried 'refreshing' FF....& it seems OK now :)

 

though it was kinda nice w/o them,

but seems I can post images (for now)

 

 

& had to disable 'tracking protection' on this site

hope THAT's ok to do?

:unsure:

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/8/2018 at 8:31 PM, mr6666 said:

& had to disable 'tracking protection' on this site

hope THAT's ok to do?

:unsure:

It's "okay" if you do not mind a host of third-party vendor telemetry "spyware" cookies gaining access into your system, monitoring your every on-line move... 
Making you ever more vulnerable to a hack attack.

Most "free" sites fund themselves through revenue gained via access granted to 3rd-party vendors.
Some (the more "legitimate" ones) merely wish to market their wares to likely potential customers, via annoying pop-ups.
Sorta-like TV commercials and newspaper/magazine adds in the "old-days."

In the "old days" if you had a newspaper or magazine subscription, then the first party vendor had some (albeit rather limited) data about you.
At the very least you were a tangible asset item on their value sheet. And more so, if you volunteered additional subscription info often solicited about yourself on a little mail-in card... i.e. "Do you own your own home?, or rent an apartment? Age, Educational level and Income range? Marital status?, Number and age of children?, Dependents?," etc.
Similar seeming unnecessary extraneously "personal" stuff, like asked on many product registration cards.

When we received our commercial Television via a rooftop antenna, or set-top "rabbit ears," the broadcasters had no personal info from it's masses of viewers and so relied upon data solicitors such as Nielsen's.
If you were solicited to be a Nielsen viewer then (generally for a small token recompense, meant to "legalize" the information transaction) you "volunteered" to provide much more detailed information about yourself and your household, in addition to your TV viewing habits.
The collected input  of their "Nielsen families," data was broken down into various demographic categories formulated for their "ratings systems." In this way various Nielsen families were assumed to generally represent the larger segments of the TV viewing population. This data was then made available by broadcasters, so third-party "Sponsors" could better tailor their "commercials" to the more popular stations and shows, etc. based upon their individual Nielsen ratings.

But we've since quickly come a very long, long way, with today's ubiquitous and readily accessible electronic devices and internet access.
Our ever more personal information is a valuable commodity, and every on-line vendor (and most brick and mortar retailers) wants more and more of it.
Sign-up for a "store shopping card" that must be swiped at every transaction and you are granting the seller access to your most personal purchasing habits (albeit for that particular store or chain).
Same thing for your credit card vendor whenever you make a credit card transaction (on-line or not). 
Sign-up for "free" on-line "coupons" and you are paying for those discounts by granting vendor cookies into your device. 

A "cookie" was a friendly little name given to a once familiar and tasty household "treat."
Like an "Easter Egg" in those old computer games with which (if you knew how to locate them, or happened to accidentally stumble upon them) you were granted access to something extra, like "special powers" or access to better tools, weapons, or treasure, etc.
But today's technology has turned that once friendly term into something ranging from simply annoying to severely and dangerously malicious.
But all "cookies" are invasive (to lesser and more frequently greater degrees).

Like a little fine-print blip, most websites will "warn you" that by simply accessing them you are granting "them" access to your device via installation of their (and 3rd party) "cookies."
They will most often offer a link to their "Privacy Policy" page, which will outline in legalese that you are voluntarily granting them (AND their 3rd Party Vendors) access to whatever information about you that their "cookies" can provide.
Some "cookies" merely monitor your on-line habits, but others delve much more deeply into the innermost parts of your device.
"Tracking" or Telemetry spyware "cookies" regularly "phone-home" with whatever data they have accumulated, much in real-time. Some just monitor your "on-line" activity, whereas others monitor everything you do with your device, from every mouse click, and keystroke, to every opened folder and document (on-line or not).
Some access everything stored in your device, from what hardware and software you have on-board, to the content of your emails, to whatever personal files and information you may have stored within.

Cookies from "Legitimate" vendors are supposed to be "self-limiting," meaning their access is supposed to automatically "expire" with a "self-destruct" date after a period of time. But many will automatically renew themselves, granting perpetual access once they are on-board, and practically all automatically renew themselves with a repeat visit to any site that "hosts" them.

Cookies range from (and allow potential access to) annoying adware, and Potentially Unwanted Programs (PUPs), to more deliberate Malware and viruses, to hostage and ransom ware, and even worse.

Firewalls, Anti-virus and anti-malware software, and some add-on programs, etc. are available to help the average on-line visitor combat against the worst of the above.
Browser settings can be adjusted to varying degrees of accessibility (and vulnerability) limiting unwanted Cookies and Tracking activity.

But these sites are like internet personal information "vampires," which are repelled by the scent of "garlic" and the sight of an on-line "cross."
They ask, or rather require (in many instances) that you dismantle or inactivate your defenses, so that "they" can gain access into your "home."
In return "they" promise you the of joy of everlasting "life" (of the damned) for the temporal pleasure of their "on-line" company.
Everlasting, because whatever information "they" have gained from you is theirs, in perpetuity, to be used or sold and reused by anyone, at anytime, for as long as you are alive, and perhaps even afterward.

We have few defenses against these voracious predators, as they are evolving more rapidly than our ability to combat them. Therefore we must be ever vigilant, least we fall victim to those of their more insidious breed.

It makes matters worse when we know not whom to trust or turn to, that truly has our best interest at heart, as they are as rare as hens-teeth. 
Many of those that say they are there defend and promote us, really desire to do so only for their own purpose and advantage.
Like a coyote who will defend your hen-house against foxes, so that they may prey first upon your chickens.
Microsoft and Google are among those which seek such exclusivity, assuming that among their 3rd Party vendors no foxes lie.

Whenever you access TCM, you are warned that this site uses third-party cookies.
Whenever you "sign-in" to TCM (assuming that you have not allowed them to "remember" you) your browser likely further warns you that this site is insecure.
On top of that, TCM now requires their users to set their browser "privacy settings" to both ALLOW ALL THIRD-PARTY COOKIES AND SITE DATA, and ALLOW SITE TRACKING....
That's like Dracula saying "I bid you welcome!" "Enter of your own free will, but leave all garlands of garlic, crosses, stakes, mirrors, and holy water at the door."

TCM may be seductively attractive in appearance and "inviting," but what lies beneath is a corporate vampire, desiring to "drink your milkshake dry." 

MooooHaaaHaaaHaaaa!!!! :ph34r::(:huh::unsure::o:blink: .....

To borrow a quote from our most illustrious "leader,"
"We are all much safer now."  "America and the world can "sleep well tonight!"  :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us