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papyrusbeetle

William Holden "goof" in "Doctor Blake Mysteries" episode!

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I love "Dr. Blake Mysteries" (an Australian series set in 1959).

In the first episode of the series ("Still Waters"), teenagers in Ballarat Australia are gathered in front of a movie theatre showing IMITATION OF LIFE, starring Lana Turner, released in 1959.

In a later episode (season 2, episode 5, "Crossing the Line"), a murder takes place in a movie theatre during the showing of VERTIGO, released in 1958, but probably not shown in Australia until 1959.

 

But in Season 1, episode 3 ("Death of a Travelling Salesman") of "Dr. Blake Mysteries", the Doctor points to a magazine article featuring William Holden, promoting his "new" film THE COUNTERFEIT TRAITOR, released in 1962.

A magazine from the near future? Or a goof in the props department.???

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Good catch. I've watched every episode myself and didn't notice it. Definitely a goof. Probably someone thought..William Holden...1950's... Close enough. Not realizing that they would have a classic movie fan watching. 

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I love "The Dr. Blake Mysteries" too.  I noticed the movie marquee for 'Vertigo', but didn't really pay too much attention to the time frame as it relates to the series.  They probably should have gone with the magazine cover story as "What's after Sabrina?" for William Holden? 

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29 minutes ago, midwestan said:

I love "The Dr. Blake Mysteries" too.  I noticed the movie marquee for 'Vertigo', but didn't really pay too much attention to the time frame as it relates to the series.  They probably should have gone with the magazine cover story as "What's after Sabrina?" for William Holden? 

It's interesting how often movie marquees are used to establish a time frame in period storytelling. It's an easy shorthand, but it's really only effective if the viewer has enough knowledge of movie history to make the correct assumption about the era. I guess that's why they went with a couple of biggies like Imitation of Life and Vertigo.

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