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Swithin

Werewolf of London (1935): A Clearly Gay Film

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As I've just posted in the Svengoolie thread in General Discussions, Werewolf of London (which is on Svengoolie tonight) is my favorite werewolf film. I've long seen it as a film with a pretty obvious gay subtext, though not until just now did I find the fascinating article which I've quoted then linked below.

"Looking at the film alongside its screenplay, by gay playwright and screenwriter John Colton, reveals how this nearly explicitly queer werewolf film also invites its viewers to ‘look below its surface’ to an extraordinary degree. To do so is to see a film that challenges narrow and restrictive definitions of what it means to be normal and human, and a film that, with deep ambivalence, makes a plea for locating gay men within both these categories by construing its main character’s condition as a natural variation along a continuum that includes us all."

https://case.edu/artsci/engl/spadoni/spadoni-strange-botany.pdf

So -- if you have a chance -- read the article and have a look at Werewolf of London with a queer eye and see what you think.

werewolf-of-london-1.jpg

1935_Warewolf_img6.jpg

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Thanks for being such a thorough documentarian. I have this on my DVR and can't wait to get to it.

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14 hours ago, Swithin said:

As I've just posted in the Svengoolie thread in General Discussions, Werewolf of London (which is on Svengoolie tonight) is my favorite werewolf film. I've long seen it as a film with a pretty obvious gay subtext, though not until just now did I find the fascinating article which I've quoted then linked below.

"Looking at the film alongside its screenplay, by gay playwright and screenwriter John Colton, reveals how this nearly explicitly queer werewolf film also invites its viewers to ‘look below its surface’ to an extraordinary degree. To do so is to see a film that challenges narrow and restrictive definitions of what it means to be normal and human, and a film that, with deep ambivalence, makes a plea for locating gay men within both these categories by construing its main character’s condition as a natural variation along a continuum that includes us all."

https://case.edu/artsci/engl/spadoni/spadoni-strange-botany.pdf

So -- if you have a chance -- read the article and have a look at Werewolf of London with a queer eye and see what you think.

werewolf-of-london-1.jpg

1935_Warewolf_img6.jpg

Yes indeed

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I just watched the film and yes there is not doubt that there is a strong homoerotic element at play from the opening scene with Henry Hull and his good looking friend doing "Brokeback Mountain" in Tibet to the other elements mentioned in the article.  The film seems to be inspired by "Dr Jeckyl and Mr Hyde" which it share similar plot points Hull's werewolf is more human like than Lon Chaney Jr's. They could have called " Dr Jeckyl and Mr Werewolf"

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